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Thread: Pantry Meals

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Thanks for that alternative whey powder, GrnEggsNHam. I checked out Mike's whey, and noticed it contains soy. For some that's not a problem, but it's something to note.

    Mike's is certainly streaks ahead of what's found on most store shelves, but I think not the high quality of Naked Whey.

    I guess it depends on why you're buying whey powder -- if it's a medical issue then the best quality would be crucial. If it's to feed a lot of people when protein sources might be scarce, then Mike's would be the better choice.

    If others have sources (shelf-stable whey or protein sources) to share, I'd love to hear about them.

    Thanks again for opening up other protein sources, GrnEggsNHam.
    Last edited by Marianne; 22nd August 2015 at 18:32.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    -As multiple people have expressed an interest in shelf stable Indian entrees I thought I’d include Tasty Bite for those who haven’t heard of them. This page shows all of their Indian meals but on the red banner across the top you can click to see just their gluten free dishes or only their vegan meals – http://tastybite.com/product_type/indian-entrees/#all

    They also offer retort packaging rice - http://tastybite.com/product_type/rices/#glutten-free and a nice selection of 60 second MSG free Asian noodles for those looking for variety however no gluten-free noodle options yet - http://tastybite.com/product_type/asian-noodles/

    -Though I don’t use protein powders I found a list of soy free powders two of which are whey concentrate based. For those who are gluten free they might be a good choice but for those who don’t need gluten free it might be worth a more exhaustive search because GF versions are always so much more expensive - http://oregaknow.com/fitness/best-gl...n-powder-list/

    Dr. Mercola’s is also soy free whey based http://proteinpowder.mercola.com/pure-protein.html

    -The other day while meal planning for a camping trip I came across a site I thought others here might enjoy. The creator shows how to make healthier versions of backpacking meals similar to Mountain House, Back Packer’s Pantry, Gourmet Reserves... Granted these won’t keep as long as because these recipes make use of dehydrated foods, whole grains and they are only packaged in Ziplock bags but most people purchasing freeze dried foods for backpacking, camping, day hiking whatever don’t need, aren’t looking for a 20+ year shelf life Just something lightweight, tasty and easy to prepare that needs no refrigeration - http://www.theyummylife.com/recipes/...26_Backpacking

    This same link takes you to her money saving copycat Kind Bar Recipes most of which would do well on the trail in cool weather and even in warm weather if the chocolate were left off. She also includes instructions for making a vegan version of them.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    GrnEggsNHam's post got me thinking of other sources of proteins. I remembered a website I'd visited awhile back when looking for maca powder. I never ordered anything from here, mainly because I wanted some of nearly all they had and didn't reduce it to a reasonable sized order. So, looking again today, with pantry foods in mind, there's so much there! I wanted to share it with others.

    Z Natural Foods located in Florida.
    http://www.znaturalfoods.com/

    They have unusual things like mushroom powder, vanilla bean powder, and vegetarian sources of protein (pea and brown rice), and goat milk whey. Their cow milk whey sounds like a very high quality; similar to Naked Whey. It's made from raw milk -- not sure if Naked Whey is... a quick search didn't turn up yes or no. (Paula? Feel like researching that?

    All sorts of vegetable, fruit, herb and root powders. And raw cacao nibs, cacao in several forms, and oh my, chocolate covered goji berries.

    Their prices seem reasonable, and shipping is free in the continental US for orders $75 and over. I'll be placing an order soon.

    On another subject, the garden is starting to yield sweet potatoes. One was a monster size that a burrowing critter had started to eat. I cut that part away and am baking it in the oven, going to make a pantry-worthy sweet potato pie using shelf-stable ingredients. If it's good, I'll post the recipe and a photo. If not, I'll try again ... lots of sweet potatoes coming my way. Going to can some in a non-sweet liquid.

    Jesse, it sounds like you know a lot about camping... thanks for sharing those resources. I'm especially interested in the copy cat Kind Bars.
    Last edited by Paul; 4th February 2016 at 02:11. Reason: reinstate znaturalfoods comment

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    For some reason, that reminds me that in Spain, eggs are treated as a shelf-stable item. They do not wash them, they still have the bloom on them when you buy them, and they don't refrigerate them in the stores. Plus, I had no refrigerator in my Spanish little half-ruin because I had no electricity, and yet the eggs never spoiled, even in the heat of the Spanish summer in a kitchen that faced South. I kept them on a low shelf, in the shade, near the floor, where it was cool.

    p.s. I never got sick from eating unrefrigerated eggs.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Very interesting, Selkie.

    What was the longest time you kept the eggs unrefrigerated?

    That means if someone had hens, they could keep the eggs for a reasonable amount of time before using them.
    Last edited by Marianne; 22nd August 2015 at 17:52.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Marianne (here)
    Very interesting, Selkie.
    What was the longest time you kept the eggs unrefrigerated?
    At least a couple of weeks, sometimes more. Seriously.

    addition I only went for groceries once every couple of weeks or so.
    Last edited by Selkie; 22nd August 2015 at 18:35.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Marianne (here)
    Their cow milk whey sounds like a very high quality; similar to Naked Whey. It's made from raw milk -- not sure if Naked Whey is... a quick search didn't turn up yes or no. (Paula? Feel like researching that?
    The short answer - Naked Whey is high quality. ♡

    Question: Is Naked Whey made from raw milk?
    Answer: Raw milk didn’t come up, but the descriptor “non-denatured whey” is used.

    “Using pasture-fed cows’ milk from small dairy farms, we use careful manufacturing processes to create a non-denatured whey loaded with … from Naked Whey site.

    Which is defined at evolutionhealth.com as: Non-denatured - The same structure and proportion as in the original substance with full biological activity. (Never damaged.)

    Nondenatured Whey Protein

    Definitions of terms used:

    Native Protein: The naturally occurring conformation of a protein. Unaltered by heat, chemicals, enzyme action or processing. (Native is the same structure and proportion as in the original substance.)

    Denatured: To cause the tertiary structure of (a protein) to unfold, as with heat, alkali, or acid, so that some of its original properties, especially its biological activity, are diminished or eliminated. (It means damaged.)

    Undenatured: To undamage. (A term that is used without discretion in the industry and is misleading. It is not possible for a protein to be undenatured.)

    Non-denatured: The same structure and proportion as in the original substance with full biological activity. (Never damaged.)

    Snippets from article and I color-coded for quick reference:

    “…Non-denatured whey protein has the highest biological value of any protein. It is a complete protein, unlike soy, and provides all the essential amino acids in the correct balance. The five major active proteins of whey are…”

    “…The public is now becoming more aware of the value of quality protein and is choosing whey protein for many good reasons. Not only does non-denatured whey have a wide range of immune-enhancing properties, it also has the ability to act as an antioxidant, antihypertensive, antitumor, antiviral and antibacterial. A number of clinical trials have successfully been performed using whey as an antimicrobial agent and in the treatment of cancer, HIV, hepatitis B & C, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. It has a major role in red blood cell production, support in chemotherapy treatment, safe binding and detoxification of heavy metals, wound healing, growth of new muscle, weight regulation and the support of numerous immune functions. It is used by populations that have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia, Hepatitis, Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Respiratory disease, cognitive disorder from nutritional compromise and for any sports performance improvement.  


    Here’s a second article on the three primary types of whey protein from medicalnewstoday.com

    - Naked Whey ingredients: Whey protein concentrate
    - Contains: Milk

    Whey Protein: Health Benefits and Side Effects

    [snippets]

    - Milk is made of two proteins, casein and whey. Whey protein can be separated from the casein in milk or formed as a by-product of cheese making.

    - Whey protein is considered a complete protein and contains all 9 essential amino acids and is low in lactose content.

    Composition and forms of whey protein

    There are three primary types of whey protein : whey protein concentrate (WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH):

    • Whey protein concentrate (Naked Whey) - WPC contains low levels of fat and low levels of carbohydrates (lactose). The percentage of protein in WPC depends on how concentrated it is. Lower end concentrates tend to have 30% protein and higher end up to 90%
    • Whey protein isolate - WPIs are further processed to remove all the fat and lactose. WPI is usually at least 90% protein
    • Whey protein hydrolysate - WPH is considered to be the "predigested" form of whey protein as it has already undergone partial hydrolysis - a process necessary for the body to absorb protein. WPH doesn't require as much digestion as the other two forms of whey protein. In addition, it is commonly used in medical protein supplements and infant formulas because of it's improved digestibility and reduced allergen potential.

    Possible health benefits of whey protein
    • Losing weight
    • Anti-cancer properties
    • Lower cholesterol
    • Asthma - (improve immune response in children)
    • Lowering blood pressure

    Possible side effects of whey protein (milk allergies)

    • Stomach pains
    • Cramps
    • Reduced appetite
    • Nausea
    • Headache
    • Fatigue
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 3rd September 2015 at 02:49.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration

    p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

    sort of off-topic, I know

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration

    p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

    sort of off-topic, I know
    Not off topic at all, Selkie!

    Things that contribute to a sense of comfort and better peace of mind, food-wise, are welcome here.

    For the past few weeks, I've been slowly building a small home bar. I've never had any interest in it before, but suddenly now I do. Perhaps the same idea as yours, of small celebrations along the way.

    And many cocktails call for bitters ... herbal blends preserved in alcohol, used in drop/dash amounts. Originally bitters were used as digestive aids, and so from that point of view, cocktails in moderation can be a healthy-ish thing. Especially when you consider they have relaxing qualities.

    Alcohol can be a depressive ... something to be aware of. And apologies to those who don't wish to/can't imbibe. I honor that and understand.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    A couple of orders arrive in the next day or two. I’ll post Ron’s question on the shelf life of the Pure Organic Synergy Vegetable Powders. The Thrive foods have a shelf life of 25 years and one year after opening. In the meantime, I’m reading up on freeze-dried vs. fresh fruits and vegetables because freeze-dried is new to me. I’m reminded that not all freeze-drying processes are alike. Some use chemicals.

    Some bullet points:

    “How Healthy Is Freeze-Dried Fruit?”

    Antioxidants - Freeze drying fruit concentrates the antioxidants it contains, which means a bigger impact on your health. Antioxidants are compounds found in most plant foods, and they work by fighting free radical damage in your body that comes from the environment and unhealthy foods. Eating foods high in antioxidants helps your body fight illnesses that include heart disease and cancer. Just 2 tbsp. of freeze-dried black raspberries offer as many antioxidants as an entire cup of fresh ones.

    Nutrients - Freeze-dried fruit contains similar amounts of nutrients when compared with fresh fruit. Some are lost during the freeze-drying process, but you still increase your intake for vitamins A and C, iron and potassium when you eat it. These vitamins and minerals protect your immunity, help your blood stay adequately oxygenated and regulate your blood pressure. Freeze-dried fruit is lighter in weight than fresh fruit, making it a good choice to carry along on a hike or marathon.

    Do freeze-dried fruits have the same nutritional value as fresh fruits?

    - The freeze-drying process simply removes water from the tissue, so it should have no direct impact on the either the inorganic or organic components at the moment of removal. The process sort of locks in what is there by removing the water, which may have otherwise fostered an environment in which degradation of the organic compounds would have been more favored. However, it is also important to note that many nutritionally-relevant compounds continue to be synthesized in fruit throughout the ripening process, and freeze-drying would also put a halt to that.

    - In freeze-drying, the water is removed in a low energy system through the process of sublimation. Because no additional energy is added, no additional reactions altering the nutritional contents of the fruit (or other food). Compare that to heated drying (or even cooking!), where energy is added and water leaves through boiling, a system favoring additional chemical reactions. These reactions may well destroy some of the desired nutritional components, though on the other hand they create other compounds with desired properties, such as flavor.

    How do freeze-dried vegetables and fruits compare with fresh ones in nutrition?

    - Just remember that if you’re eating a lot of freeze-dried foods, you want to stay extra hydrated to make up for their lack of water. Also keep in mind that the freeze-drying process involves chemical treatments. While most of the chemicals used in these processes are FDA approved and regulated, it is good to be aware that some chemicals may have adverse health effects, particularly for those who have a sulfite sensitivity.

    - Are freeze-dried fruits and veggies good for you? Research has shown that while freeze-dried fruits and vegetables contain slightly lower amounts of certain vitamins, they are rich in antioxidants and fiber. Most researchers agree that the amount of nutrients lost from freeze-drying is miniscule.

    - What about calories? Because freeze-dried fruits and vegetables lack water, they are highly concentrated, which means they contain more calories than their original form. Confused? Think about it like this — if one cup of a particular fresh fruit is 100 calories, when you freeze dry that same amount of fruit it will shrink in size. So, one cup of freeze-dried fruit will contain more pieces of fruit than one cup of fresh fruit. This translates to more calories.

    - In any form, fruits and vegetables provide you with vitamins and nutrients that are essential to your health. Whether you choose fresh or freeze-dried, it’s a good idea to include plenty of fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 25th August 2015 at 21:02.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


    I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
    And I wonder what the shelf life is.
    Hi Ron,

    The shelf life of the organic carrot and beet vegetable powders from TheSynergyCompany.com are 2-3 months once opened. The kale didn’t state it nor did I find it on the site. I’ll assume it’s the same.

    Note: there was no date stamped on the bottles as to when they were filled.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Marianne (here)
    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration

    p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

    sort of off-topic, I know
    Not off topic at all, Selkie!

    Things that contribute to a sense of comfort and better peace of mind, food-wise, are welcome here.

    For the past few weeks, I've been slowly building a small home bar. I've never had any interest in it before, but suddenly now I do. Perhaps the same idea as yours, of small celebrations along the way.

    And many cocktails call for bitters ... herbal blends preserved in alcohol, used in drop/dash amounts. Originally bitters were used as digestive aids, and so from that point of view, cocktails in moderation can be a healthy-ish thing. Especially when you consider they have relaxing qualities.

    Alcohol can be a depressive ... something to be aware of. And apologies to those who don't wish to/can't imbibe. I honor that and understand.
    Alcohol is also really important for making herbal tinctures for medicinal purposes. The feds don't allow us to legally make distilled spirits, but even mead or wine, which are allowed, are better at extracting the medicinal properties of plants than plain water is.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


    I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
    And I wonder what the shelf life is.
    Hi Ron,

    The shelf life of the organic carrot and beet vegetable powders from TheSynergyCompany.com are 2-3 months once opened. The kale didn’t state it nor did I find it on the site. I’ll assume it’s the same.

    Note: there was no date stamped on the bottles as to when they were filled.
    Shelf life, once opened, should be dramatically increased if the container can be vacuum sealed. Once a vacuum seal is established (oxygen and moisture removed) the remaining shelf life should not be reduced.

    If the original jar will fit inside a Mason jar, these methods can be applied.

    Vacuum packing using a Pump-N-Seal or a ZipLock bag vacuum pump (no electricity or batteries needed).

    These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

    Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check, or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods. Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

    Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular or wide mouth jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).

    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 26th August 2015 at 20:19.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

    Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check, or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods. Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

    Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular or wide mouth jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).
    Thanks, Ron. I've gone through three Foodsavers. Not because their poor quality. I've use them for a long time. The unit takes up prime real-estate space and I stopped using the plastic seal bags. I'm researching a model that vacuums mason jars only. I wasn't please with the public's feedback, so I'm still in research phase. Thanks for the links. I'll check them out.

    I found that the wide mouth jars seal better than the regular size. I read where people had trouble with the seal. People advised to double up and it sounded like they added the screw top as well. I found that sometimes you get a faulty one, so toss it.

    I added to my mason jar collection this season. I have as many liter size as the quart size. They've got a quart size, wide mouth that's slightly taller and much thinner. Which is perfect if you have limited space.
    Last edited by RunningDeer; 26th August 2015 at 21:07.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by RunningDeer (here)
    Quote Posted by Ron Mauer Sr (here)
    These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

    Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check, or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods. Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

    Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular or wide mouth jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).
    Thanks, Ron. I've gone through three Foodsavers. Not because their poor quality. I've use them for a long time. The unit takes up prime real-estate space and I stopped using the plastic seal bags. I'm researching a model that vacuums mason jars only. I wasn't please with the public's feedback, so I'm still in research phase. Thanks for the links. I'll check them out.

    I found that the wide mouth jars seal better than the regular size. I read where people had trouble with the seal. People advised to double up and it sounded like they added the screw top as well. I found that sometimes you get a faulty one, so toss it.

    I added to my mason jar collection this season. I have as many liter size as the quart size. They've got a quart size, wide mouth that's slightly taller and much thinner. Which is perfect if you have limited space.
    I live in a humid part of the country, and when I go to store dehydrated stuff, I turn my oven on low and heat the Mason jars for a couple of minutes, to drive off any damp. I fill them while they are still warm with cooled, dehydrated stuff, and I notice that they often seal. So I wonder if I heated them a little more, if they would all seal?

    Just an observation...for an experiment the next time I dehydrate something.

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    United States Avalon Member RunningDeer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    I live in a humid part of the country, and when I go to store dehydrated stuff, I turn my oven on low and heat the Mason jars for a couple of minutes, to drive off any damp. I fill them while they are still warm with cooled, dehydrated stuff, and I notice that they often seal. So I wonder if I heated them a little more, if they would all seal?

    Just an observation...for an experiment the next time I dehydrate something.
    That's the same principle I found when I'd fill the jars with the extra foods/soups. They'd created a bit of a vacuum because it was still warm. I'd still seal them with the Foodsaver because it vacuumed out 100% of the air.

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    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    I've used the Ziplock pump ($4.23) with both the Foodsaver Jar Sealers and the simple check valves sold by Pump-N-Seal.

    The Ziplock pump is so inexpensive it might not be as durable as others. But I love simplicity, and I have spares.

    I've not measured the actual vacuum created with each option (electric Foodsaver, Ziplock pump, Pump-N-Seal). That is on my to do list.

    My electric Foodsaver was put away to reclaim counter space but it can be retrieved if needed.

    The Foodsaver plastic bags are not 100% air tight as are Mylar bags, but vacuuming Mylar bags requires additional techniques.

    (update) All the electric Foodsavers that I've seen can vacuum pack Mason jars with the proper attachments (plastic hose and jar sealer lid).
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 27th August 2015 at 01:02.

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    United States Moderator Marianne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    In different scenarios, we could find ourselves with varying resources. For example, the food supply could be interrupted but the grid still be up and our ovens still working.

    In which case we'd have reason for happiness in the form of warm biscuits with peppered white gravy....

    In the southern US, biscuits are a sort of holy grail. The fluffy bread sort of biscuit, not the British cookie-type of biscuit. Southern biscuits are not too healthy, being made with white flour and butter/lard, but they are so delicious and a definite comfort food to enjoy occasionally. You can make biscuits from pantry staples if you use oil instead of butter, and buttermilk powder/water or canned evaporated milk instead of fresh milk/buttermilk. I don't have a biscuit recipe ... if you need one, best to google allrecipes.com or cooks.com. I 'measure' according to the size bowl, etc.

    One important note if you're making biscuits... use soft winter wheat flour, which has less protein and lower gluten. One brand that's widely sold in my area is White Lily. It rises appreciably higher, is light, makes a lovely crust and a soft tender inside. You can order it through Amazon if it's not sold in your area.

    Peppered White Gravy Recipe (bottom right image on purple check tablecloth)
    • 1/4 cup flour
    • 2 1/2 cups milk
    • 1/4 cup butter
    • Salt and pepper to taste
    Whisk flour and cold milk together in a pan. Slice butter into pats and add to pan. Heat until thickened, stirring constantly. Season to taste. Pour over hot biscuits.

    NOTE: Peppered white gravy mix is available in packets, for convenience and folks who don't care to cook. It has some additives, but is very easy and shelf stable.
    ------------------
    Biscuits with Other Sorts of Gravy

    I didn't make tomato gravy today, so am borrowing an image from Tara Cooks (taracooks.com) -- a lovely blog you may want to visit for good recipes.



    Tomato Gravy Recipe (bacon drippings optional)
    • 2 cups canned tomatoes, diced, not drained (1 16-oz can)
    • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
    • 2 tablespoons bacon drippings or butter or oil
    Melt butter or place drippings/oil into a skillet/pan. Mix flour into tomatoes with a wire whisk and add to fat. Stir frequently as it heats to just boiling and thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour over biscuits, meatloaf/bean loaf/lentil loaf, or noodles.
    -----------------
    Chocolate Gravy
    No chocolate gravy today either, so the image below is from roadfoods.com (left image below)

    Chocolate Gravy Recipe
    • 3 tablespoons cocoa powder
    • 2 tablespoons flour
    • 1 cup sugar
    • 1 1/2 cups milk
    • 2-3 tablespoons butter or oil
    Stir together dry ingredients in a skillet/pan and whisk in milk. Cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Add butter and stir to melt. Pour over hot biscuits, pancakes, waffles, or cake.
    -----------------
    Red-Eye Gravy Recipe (no photo)
    This is the easiest of gravies to make, with just two ingredients (three counting the biscuits you pour it on)
    • A skillet where you've cooked ham
    • Strong hot black coffee (1/4 cup to 1 cup)
    Pour the coffee into the ham-encrusted skillet and slowly simmer for a couple of minutes. Pour over hot biscuits.
    -----------------
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by Marianne; 29th August 2015 at 17:09.

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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Quote Posted by Selkie (here)
    Alcohol is also really important for making herbal tinctures for medicinal purposes. The feds don't allow us to legally make distilled spirits, but even mead or wine, which are allowed, are better at extracting the medicinal properties of plants than plain water is.
    Good point about herbal tinctures. Alcohol is also a great item for barter.

    I use the cheapest vodka to make tinctures, but to get the most medicinal extraction, Everclear is best, having the highest proof. Tinctures are taken in drop amounts (10 - 20 drops daily is typical) so a little goes a long way.

    Hot water does extract quite a bit of the medicine too, so a hot tea or broth is a great way too. Leaves/flowers should steep 3-10 minutes, and berries 20-30 minutes, and roots/bark should sit in hot water for at least a couple of hours.

    There's one exception -- chamomile tea. If you want the calming, sleep-inducing qualities, steep it under 3 minutes. After that, the bitter constituents come out and it becomes an excellent digestive tea. Let it steep up to 10 minutes or so. If you are drinking it for digestive qualities, don't add any sweetener. Part of the process involves bitterness on the tongue, to begin bile production.

    I started an herbal tea thread awhile back, with a few recipes.
    http://projectavalon.net/forum4/show...al-Tea-Recipes

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    Australia Avalon Retired Member
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    Default Re: Pantry Meals

    Hello everyone
    For Melbun Australian conditions let me see what I have in store here...
    Combustion heater with oven lid: for cooking on and baking in
    Sun oven: for baking and stewing in and boiling water (I haven't got a good recipe for rice cooking yet - anyone, anyone?)
    Water: water tank
    water purifier: a straw that you filter your water through and then you can drink the water from the water tank. It filters out all the nasty bugs and heavy metals. The tank is gravity fed. I still need to get a kit that will allow me to do a whole container load. Thanks for this thread because it is now going on my list.
    dehydrator: for drying and storing fruit and vegetable produce. I keep these stored in glass containers.
    Blender with mill attachment: For making vegetable powders from the dehydrated vegetables.
    Pressure cooker: for dried beans and pulses
    cast iron enamelled pots: for stews and rice and anything else you can think of
    cast iron enamelled panini maker: for roast vegetable toasties
    Permaculture garden and neighbours with all their permaculture produce: eating as much leafy greens and fruit for moisture content.
    Sprouts: I can grow nutrient dense food inside.
    Bottled spring water: If we get caught in a flood, no drinking water is available. Same with droughts and bushfire. There are only two ways out of our property and we may be trapped for any number of reasons...

    recipe for the sun oven - it can also go on the combustion heater
    My Ginger, pear and almond cake
    (If no pears available, canned or otherwise then just replace with whatever fruit you do have and omit the ginger)

    2 tspns ginger powder
    1 pear
    3 tspns baking powder
    2 tspns no egg replacer or similar product
    2 cups spelt flour
    2 cups coconut sugar
    1/2 cup coconut oil
    1 cup almond meal
    1 cup water
    1/2 cup chia seeds

    Method
    In a bowl, mix all the dry ingredients together until well mixed. Set aside.
    In the meantime, melt the coconut oil (if it needs it) in a bowl and place it in the sun oven until liquid.
    Mash the pear and then add this to the dry mix. Slowly add the water and then lastly add the oil. Mix until well combined.
    Place in the sun oven for as long as it takes!
    The sun oven holds all the moisture so you wil find that this cake is incredibly moist.
    Last edited by Constance; 30th August 2015 at 05:55.

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