+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 3
Results 41 to 51 of 51

Thread: Does the metal library really exist??

  1. Link to Post #41
    On Sabbatical
    Join Date
    10th July 2013
    Location
    Project Avalon
    Posts
    3,652
    Thanks
    19,216
    Thanked 16,127 times in 3,214 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    [...] it's claimed the library can be reached -- via an underwater entrance to the cave system.
    Reading the following claims, I'm not totally convinced that the entrance is underwater...

    Quote Posted by Stan Grist
    The secret entrance is only accessed from underwater!
    Quote Posted by Gaston Fernández Borrero
    According to the story, they had to dive down a few meters, swim a short distance under the water and come up into a small cave
    Quote Posted by Stanley Hall
    Jaramillo always said that the entrance was under the river [...] Entrance is gained through an underwater opening in a river [...] whenever diving equipment was discussed as a necessity Petronio would say that even though it [the entrance to the cave] was under the river, it did not mean we would get wet.
    Quote Posted by Petronio Jaramillo (according to Pino Turolla)
    Finally we climbed over the top of another small plateau and looked down and saw at our feet a good-sized stream. We jumped into it from a considerable height—something I had never done before in my life—and crossed it. Then we came to what looked like the entrance to a small cave. But as we entered it, leaving the water behind us, I realized I was treading on steps made in perfect symmetry.

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Atlas For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (23rd February 2015), Billy (1st September 2014), conk (20th April 2016), GoodETxSG (1st September 2014), Muzz (23rd February 2015), Nasu (1st September 2014), Spellbound (8th December 2018)

  3. Link to Post #42
    On Sabbatical
    Join Date
    10th July 2013
    Location
    Project Avalon
    Posts
    3,652
    Thanks
    19,216
    Thanked 16,127 times in 3,214 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Maybe not related to the metal library but I found it intriguing that Manuel Palacios Villavicencio matches the Ecuadorian coat of arms with a plate from the Crespi collection:



    His analysis in English: http://tayoscave.wordpress.com/2012/...ms-of-ecuador/

    and in Spanish: http://tayoscave.wordpress.com/2012/...o-ecuatoriano/

  4. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Atlas For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (23rd February 2015), Hervé (1st September 2014), Muzz (23rd February 2015), nomadguy (24th May 2016), seko (20th April 2016), Spellbound (8th December 2018), sunflower (1st September 2014)

  5. Link to Post #43
    On Sabbatical
    Join Date
    10th July 2013
    Location
    Project Avalon
    Posts
    3,652
    Thanks
    19,216
    Thanked 16,127 times in 3,214 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)

    Klaus showed Kerry and myself a couple of the metal tablets which had been extracted from the library. He had only been able to take them back to Austria because they had been branded as fakes. He was totally happy about that, as this enabled him to keep them.





    Relief of winged genie, Palace of Ashurnasirpal ll
    Nimrud
    Neo-Assyrian Period
    883-859 B.C.


    (click image to enlarge)

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Atlas For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (23rd February 2015), Muzz (23rd February 2015), Spellbound (8th December 2018)

  7. Link to Post #44
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,036 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Father Crespi Mystery Deepens: Ancient Origins Blocked from Further Investigations

    By John Black 11 April, 2016 - 14:50



    Earlier this month we reported on an investigation into the story of Father Crespi and his missing artifacts. The story of Father Crespi is a mysterious and controversial account of a priest in Ecuador involving claims of unknown civilizations, strange golden artifacts, a subterranean cave system containing a metallic library, depictions of figures connecting America to Sumeria, symbols depicting an unknown language, and a Vatican conspiracy involving thousands of missing artifacts. Ancient Origins undertook an investigation to find out how much of the story is true. While our initial enquiries produced valuable information, our latest explorations resulted in threats and a warning to stop pursuing further investigations into the missing artifacts.

    If you have not yet read the first article, please read it here before proceeding with this update.

    To summarize the results of our findings, our investigations determined that:
    • Father Crespi’s collection is not missing but was purchased by the Central Bank of Ecuador and is currently stored in their museum vaults.
    • The majority of Crespi’s collection consists of authentic and valuable artifacts gathered from around Ecuador.
    • The so-called Metallic Library mentioned by Eric von Däniken in his controversial book ‘The Gold of the Gods’ is nothing more than modern-day carvings on cheap metal.
    • A small subset of artifacts, which were photographed and filmed in the 1970s, consisting of gold carvings, hieroglyphs and Sumerian figures is genuinely missing and no one seems to have the answers as to where they are located and what their significance is.
    Digging Deeper
    On Wednesday the 30 th March, Dr Ioannis Syrigos, Co-Founder of Ancient Origins, arranged an appointment with Dr Luis Alvarez, expert on Father Crespi and Editor General of the Universidad Politécnica Salesiana (a University founded by Father Crespi), to clarify a few missing pieces to the Crespi puzzle for a video Ancient Origin’s is preparing about Father Crespi’s life. This is an important video that will present the great personality of Father Crespi and his immense help to the people of Cuenca, Ecuador.

    The missing pieces of the puzzle are of course the golden artifacts depicting hieroglpyhs and Sumerian figures, the ones that Crespi presents and supports in his videos with Stanley Hall and the ones that Professor Barry Fell of Harvard University identified as original. Some of these artifacts can be seen in the video below.

    The missing artifacts consist not only of metallic (golden) tablets, but also clay and stone artifacts with unusual carvings, none of which were among the thousands of artifacts that we viewed in his collection held by the Central Bank of Ecuador. Some of the artifacts were accepted by Father Crespi as original and authentic, while others were fake, which he also knew and acknowledged. As a highly educated man – a scientist, educator, anthropologist, botanist, artist, explorer, cinematographer, humanitarian and musician – Father Crespi was in a good position to assess the authenticity of the artifacts.

    The University Withholds Information on Crespi’s Artifacts
    After our arrival at the University, we met with Dr Luis Alvarez, who as always was friendly and welcoming, eager to help us complete our research and the video about Father Crespi.

    In our discussion, we explained the importance of having all the facts around Crespi clear in the video, otherwise the video would be incomplete. However, any reference to the missing artifacts made Dr Alvarez uncomfortable. Initially it seemed that this was because he preferred that we focus on the other aspects of Father Crespi’s life that he deemed more important than the artifacts – i.e. his charitable endeavours. However, later it appeared that there were other reasons he was uncomfortable discussing the artifacts.


    The official response of Dr Alvarez was that these artifacts simply went missing, never to be found again. His assistant kindly clarified that 2 years before the death of Father Crespi, all items in his collection were recorded apart from the missing artifacts, which according to her, were already gone by then.

    While initially Dr Alvarez said he knew nothing about the location of the missing artifacts, later on he contradicted this statement by saying that he was not authorized to talk about them, suggesting that it was not that he did not know, but that he was not permitted to reveal anything about them and was withholding information.

    Involvement of the Vatican?
    At some point during our discussion, we asked Dr Alvarez about reports that the missing artifacts had been shipped to the Vatican in Italy. His response was not to deny that this took place, but to say that he was aware that pieces of art had been sent to the Vatican because Father Crespi was a collector of Art and he had many items in his possession.

    Ancient Origins Threatened to Leave the Investigation Alone
    In the end, our persistence to clarify the situation led to an indirect threat that we should not question the Salesianos community because they are a very powerful religious community in Ecuador and therefore it is best that we do not look more into the missing artifacts, which are not important to their cause – making Father Crespi a Saint.


    It was quite clear that during our conversation many contradictory statements were made, revealing that there is very obviously something that someone does not want the public to know about. Is there a cover up to hide the fact that the precious artifacts were stolen or sold for profit by someone? Or where they hidden away because they revealed something controversial about the history of the country?

    Military Involvement?
    In addition to our enquiries at the University, we also managed to get in touch with an investigator who came to Ecuador around a decade ago to carry out his own search into the Father Crespi mystery. While he asked to remain anonymous, he did allow us to relay some information he obtained during his enquiries. Upon visiting the Central Bank Museum of Ecuador, where Crespi’s artifacts are currently stored, he was told that the missing artifacts had been sold by the Chuch of Maria Auxiliadora, where Crespi carried out his charitable endeavours, to the Ecuadorian Military. He was also told that this information was confidential and not to be made public. We have been unable to verify the accuracy of this information, but it does add a new avenue to explore.

    Despite the insistence by the University that we drop the investigations into the artifacts, we are now proceeding with further explorations through other channels and we will update on the results in due course. We will soon prepare a video showing the incredible life of Father Crespi, a multi-talented man whose main concern was to help the people of Ecuador.


    Featured image: A collection of artifacts given to Father Crespi


    Related:
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  8. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    Atlas (18th May 2016), Bill Ryan (20th April 2016), conk (20th April 2016), Ewan (20th April 2016), nomadguy (24th May 2016), onawah (20th April 2016), Sir Eltor (24th May 2016), Sophocles (20th April 2016), Spellbound (8th December 2018), StandingWave (20th April 2016)

  9. Link to Post #45
    On Sabbatical
    Join Date
    10th July 2013
    Location
    Project Avalon
    Posts
    3,652
    Thanks
    19,216
    Thanked 16,127 times in 3,214 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??




    The symbols "XO" are also found on this artifact from the Burrows cave:


    http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/so...erground12.htm
    Last edited by Atlas; 23rd May 2016 at 20:28.

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Atlas For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (23rd May 2016), Hervé (23rd May 2016), Nasu (8th December 2018), Spellbound (8th December 2018)

  11. Link to Post #46
    Canada Avalon Member Spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    21st December 2010
    Location
    Toronto
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,017
    Thanks
    5,912
    Thanked 5,988 times in 940 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Not sure if these are the Ecuadorian caves that Bill was referring to a few months ago in the Cory Goode thread, but it is rather intriguing. Apologies if this has been posted previously (I just came across it last night).



    Dave - Toronto

  12. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Spellbound For This Post:

    avid (8th December 2018), Bill Ryan (8th December 2018), Ken (16th December 2018), mountain_jim (9th December 2018), Nasu (8th December 2018)

  13. Link to Post #47
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    21,432
    Thanks
    74,570
    Thanked 269,820 times in 19,916 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Yes, this is the same place: the Tayos Cave.

    See this thread:
    (merging the threads... that also bumps the original VERY interesting thread on this. So Thx!)
    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 8th December 2018 at 00:24.

  14. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    avid (8th December 2018), Ken (16th December 2018), mountain_jim (9th December 2018), Nasu (8th December 2018), Spellbound (8th December 2018), Yoda (8th December 2018)

  15. Link to Post #48
    Canada Avalon Member Spellbound's Avatar
    Join Date
    21st December 2010
    Location
    Toronto
    Age
    51
    Posts
    1,017
    Thanks
    5,912
    Thanked 5,988 times in 940 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Woops, sorry Bill. Please feel free to merge and bump. My bad. Have you ever been there? Is it even possible to enter these caves or are they sectioned off now??

    This is like stumbling upon a new TV series and finding out there are a couple of seasons to binge watch. Those artifacts of Klaus Dona is fascinating stuff!!

    Dave - Toronto

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Spellbound For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (8th December 2018), Ken (16th December 2018), Nasu (8th December 2018)

  17. Link to Post #49
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    21,432
    Thanks
    74,570
    Thanked 269,820 times in 19,916 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Quote Posted by Spellbound (here)
    Woops, sorry Bill. Please feel free to merge and bump. My bad. Have you ever been there? Is it even possible to enter these caves or are they sectioned off now??

    This is like stumbling upon a new TV series and finding out there are a couple of seasons to binge watch. Those artifacts of Klaus Dona is fascinating stuff!!

    Dave - Toronto
    Yes, one can go there, and there's a group that organizes trips. I've been very tempted to dig into that, I have to say.

    But it's very arduous getting there, in the past involving jeep trips through the jungle and then quite a long jungle hike.

    This website is one I've only just seen, and some of the photos show what it's like.
    Two are below... visit the site to see them all. It appears they approached the cave by river, which might be a lot easier.






    Here's an account of an expedition there:
    ... the expedition organizer being Arutam Ecotours. Their page is [supposed to be] here:
    ... but it's offline and can't be found. However, Archive.org allows us to see it, as of earlier this year:
    I just sent them a message (via the archived contact page), so we'll see if they respond.

    The address given for their office is actually fairly near where I live, so I'll most definitely drop by in a few days' time to see if they're still there.

  18. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    avid (8th December 2018), Ken (16th December 2018), mountain_jim (9th December 2018), Nasu (8th December 2018), Spellbound (8th December 2018), Valerie Villars (8th December 2018), Yoda (8th December 2018)

  19. Link to Post #50
    United States Avalon Member onawah's Avatar
    Join Date
    28th March 2010
    Posts
    11,120
    Thanks
    27,046
    Thanked 47,578 times in 9,689 posts

    Default

    Not sure if this has been posted before, but there is a 2008 free article called Quest for the Metal Library from Nexus Magazine you can download here:
    https://nexusmagazine.com/free-downl...ient-mysteries

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)

    Yes, one can go there, and there's a group that organizes trips. I've been very tempted to dig into that, I have to say.
    Oops, sorry. That is the same article as in the OP, just a different source. (sigh)
    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 21st April 2019 at 16:04.
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

  20. Link to Post #51
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    21,432
    Thanks
    74,570
    Thanked 269,820 times in 19,916 posts

    Default Re: Does the metal library really exist??

    Here's a pretty mainstream article from https://atlasobscura.com/places/cueva-de-los-tayos.

    It's rather scathing about Erich von Däniken, and doesn't mention a thing about Father Crespi and his extraordinary collection — which definitely came from somewhere! But there's some general information there that may be of interest.

    ~~~

    Cueva de los Tayos

    This cave system allegedly holds the "metallic library" of a lost ancient civilization.

    In 1976, a major expedition entered the Cueva de los Tayos in search of artificial tunnels, lost gold, strange sculptures, and a “metallic library,” supposedly left by a lost civilization aided by extraterrestrials. Among the group was the astronaut Neil Armstrong.

    For as long as anyone can remember, the indigenous Shuar people of Ecuador have been entering a vast cave system on the jungle-covered eastern foothills of the Andes. They descend, using ladders made of vines, through one of three vertiginous entrances, the largest of which is a 213-foot-deep (65-meter) shaft that leads into a network of tunnels and chambers stretching, as far as we know, for at least 2.85 miles. The largest chamber measures 295 feet by 787 feet.


    Inside the cave

    For the Shuar, these caves have long been a center for spiritual and ceremonial practices, home to powerful spirits as well as tarantulas, scorpions, spiders, and rainbow boas. They are also home to nocturnal oilbirds, known locally as tayos, hence the name of the cave. The tayos are a favored food of the Shuar, another reason why they brave the depths of the cave system.


    An oilbird roosts on a cave ledge

    In their role as guardians of the cave system, the Shuar had been left in relative peace over the last century or two, apart from an occasional gold prospector snooping around in the 1950s and ‘60s. Until, that was, a certain Erich von Däniken decided to get involved.

    The Swiss author captured the global imagination in 1968 with the publication of his book Chariots of the Gods?, which was in large part responsible for the current plague of ancient astronaut theories and all that malarkey. Then, three years later, he published The Gold of the Gods, unleashing a little-known theory about the Cueva de los Tayos upon his eager readership.

    In The Gold of the Gods, von Däniken recounted the claims of János Juan Móricz, an explorer who claimed to have entered the caves in 1969. Inside the cave, he asserted, he had discovered a treasure trove of gold, strange artifacts and sculptures, and a “metallic library” containing lost information preserved on metal tablets. And the caves themselves were surely artificial, he claimed, created by some advanced intelligence now lost to history.

    This was red meat for von Däniken, of course, and tied in very nicely with his spate of lucrative books promoting his theories of lost civilizations, ancient astronauts, and the like (or, as Carl Sagan put it, von Däniken’s theory that “our ancestors were dummies”).

    It also inspired the first major scientific expedition to Cueva de los Tayos. The 1976 expedition was led by Stan Hall, a Scottish civil engineer who had read von Däniken’s work. It quickly grew to become one of the largest cave expeditions of its time, with more than 100 people involved. These included British and Ecuadorian government officials, leading scientists and speleologists, British special forces, professional cavers, and none other than astronaut Neil Armstrong, who served as the expedition’s Honorary President.

    The expedition was a success, at least in its less fanciful ambitions. The extensive network of caves was mapped far more thoroughly than ever before. Zoological and botanical findings were recorded. And archaeological discoveries were made. But no gold was found, no otherworldly artifacts discovered, and there was no sign of a metallic library. The cave system, too, appeared to be the result of natural forces rather than any kind of advanced engineering.

    Interest in the Cueva de los Tayos never again reached the heights of the 1976 expedition, but numerous research expeditions have since taken place. One of the more recent expeditions was that of Josh Gates and his team for the fourth season of the television series Expedition Unknown. Gates entered the cave system with Shuar guides and Eileen Hall, the daughter of the late Stan Hall from the 1976 expedition. And while expeditions such as these have resulted in fascinating zoological and geological discoveries, there’s still no sign of gold, aliens, or a library.

    Know Before You Go

    The Cueva de los Tayos is located in the rainforest about 23 miles southeast of the town of Santiago de Mendez in southeastern Ecuador, not far from the border with Peru. It is within the Sindical Center Coangos, and is therefore on Shuar territory. Access to the cave must be arranged with local Shuar authorities. Expeditions to the cave can be carried out on foot, by boat, or a combination of the two. It is sometimes also possible to go via helicopter from the town of Macas, some 50 miles north of the caves.

  21. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    Hervé (21st April 2019), Inversion (26th April 2019), Kryztian (21st April 2019), muxfolder (23rd April 2019), Satori (23rd April 2019), Yoda (23rd April 2019)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 3

Similar Threads

  1. Does the soul exist?
    By The One in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 10th November 2010, 12:04
  2. Amazing Library of Documentaries
    By ascendingstarseed in forum Movies, TV, Books, and Popular Culture
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 16th October 2010, 01:48
  3. Why do you believe ETs do exist and what are they up to?
    By cloud9 in forum Ufology, Extraterrestrial Contact
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: 20th September 2010, 16:49
  4. World Videos Library
    By Scott in forum Movies, TV, Books, and Popular Culture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 21st March 2010, 21:08
  5. Do Solar Tsunami's Exist?
    By NASA in forum Solar Activity, Reports and Discussions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26th February 2010, 19:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts