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Thread: The Problems with Facebook

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Quote Posted by latte (here)
    That reminds me of an old, now defunct website called f***microsoft.com from 2003 or 04 perhaps. It was a very disgruntled ex-employee that said he knew for certain that when updating windows that MS would scan your Documents folder. He also mentioned some files that could be removed from windows libraries that would prove and stop this. He advised to place all documents in your own created folder rather than the MS provided official "Documents" folder, and many others tidbits of info long forgotten.

    He also mentioned that Windows had a 'backdoor' for govt agencies from Win95 on, and other systems quickly added them. It's everywhere as we know by now.

    BTW, I tried the cat food test only I mentioned dog food several times. I stated seeing dog food ads after 2 days.

    Quote Posted by LadyM (here)

    Although not related to Facebook but definitely connected to your post, Microsoft must be spying on our written words too. Why do I think this? A couple of years ago, I had an OBE in which I came out of some underground passage way (or portal), along with a small group of others in Dubai City. Mind you, at that time, I knew almost zero about this city. At one point in my experience, I am trying to find Burj Khalifa, the city's tallest building, which, like the city, I knew almost nothing about -- not even its name -- up until this experience. But I am having trouble seeing it. It was very foggy, making it hard for me to see anything.

    After the experience, I recorded what I remembered in my journal, which is a MS Word document. One day maybe a year later, after getting the Windows 10 update for the first time, the background image on the password/sign-in screen showed a photo of a modern city with tall skyscrapers shrouded in fog. It was an aerial photo, probably taken from a helicopter. It looked familiar, and, after digging, I discovered it was Dubai City. Only within the last few months have I questioned how and why I was delivered that photo. Something reading my journal?
    Thank you, Latte. Good to know info.

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  3. Link to Post #142
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    A fascinating interview with former Facebook Vice President Chamath Palihapitiya. Highly recommended, the whole thing.

    I can't endorse all his views, but he's a very honest man. He talks about his Facebook guilt starting at about 21:30.


    Adan Salazar, from Infowars, wrote this summary:

    ~~~

    A former Facebook executive believes social media networks are employing tools that are destroying society’s “social fabric,” the rules of conduct by which people interact in real life.

    In a November discussion at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Former Facebook Vice President Chamath Palihapitiya revealed he feels “tremendous guilt” over his role in heading a company which is aiding the destruction of society.

    “The short-term, dopamine-driven feedback loops we’ve created are destroying how society works,” Palihapitiya said, pointing to the insatiable need for “hearts, likes, thumbs-up.”

    “No civil discourse, no cooperation; misinformation, mistruth. And it’s not an American problem — this is not about Russian ads. This is a global problem,” the venture capitalist stated. “So we are in a really bad state of affairs right now, in my opinion. It is eroding the core foundations of how people behave by and between each other.”

    Palihapitiya also highlighted the way social media is able to manipulate mob mentality by referring to an incident in which seven Indian people were lynched due to a WhatsApp hoax.

    “That’s what we’re dealing with,” he said. “And imagine taking that to the extreme, where bad actors can now manipulate large swathes of people to do anything you want. It’s just a really, really bad state of affairs.”
    “And we compound the problem, right? We curate our lives around this perceived sense of perfection, because we get rewarded in these short-term signals – hearts, likes, thumbs up – and we conflate that with value and we conflate it with truth. And instead what it really is is fake brittle popularity that’s short-term and that leaves you even more – and admit it – vacant and empty before you did it, because then it forces you into this vicious cycle where you’re like, ‘What’s the next thing I need to do now? Because I need it back.’ Think about that compounded by two billion people, and then think about how people react then to the perceptions of others.”
    “Your behaviors, you don’t realize it, but you are being programmed,” Palihapitiya said. “It was unintentional, but now you got to decide how much you are willing to give up, how much of your intellectual independence.

    Similar to how Apple’s Steve Jobs didn’t allow his children to use Ipads, Palihapitiya referring to Facebook said his children “aren’t allowed to use that sh*t.”

    The former Facebook executive’s thoughts follow comments from the network’s first president Sean Parker, who in November revealed he believed the constant need for validation via social media was possibly re-wiring human brains.

    “The thought process that went into building these applications, Facebook being the first of them, … was all about: ‘How do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible?’” Parker said at an Axios event.

    “I don’t know if I really understood the consequences of what I was saying, because [of] the unintended consequences of a network when it grows to a billion or 2 billion people and … it literally changes your relationship with society, with each other … It probably interferes with productivity in weird ways. God only knows what it’s doing to our children’s brains.”

    Amid slamming Facebook’s psychological model, Palihapitiya underscored the company “overwhelmingly does good in the world,” while at the same time highlighting the need for users to take “hard breaks” from the app.
    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 12th December 2017 at 11:07.

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    United States Avalon Member Valerie Villars's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    The easiest way to revolutionize society and get rid of Facebook would be to pull the plug. Literally. If there is no electricity, there is no Facebook. That's why books are so valuable.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    No need to break up faecesbook or get rid of it , just get someone with sufficient political clout to get them to use a standard with an open API. Much like browsers, email and everything else internet related before these people got involved who see it as their life's mission to make their company the de-facto web starting silo services.

    So, a person who chooses to use Diaspora could add in a contact that they know is a Faecesbook user, and vice versa and continue to see their updates.

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  9. Link to Post #145
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    The BBC just broadcast a program that takes a look at Facebook and talks about the algorythm it uses to provide the news feed users get.

    I recorded it and here it is as an mp3 file:

    MP3
    https://app.box.com/s/g4fnq2zpzb25hoqzpk0m5zv9huntx2ss
    .................................................. my first language is TYPO..............................................

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    I get icky feelings from any being who uses algorithms to create "a life or lives" so to speak. Totally left brained and demonic. They leave no room for humanity, which of course, they want to destroy. I mean the real humanity of creativity, independence, love, etc.

    Father forgive them.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Ex-CIA Officer: Facebook 'Routinely' Blocking Accounts at US, Israel's Requests

    Sputnik Opinion
    16:24 02.01.2018
    (updated 16:44 02.01.2018)


    © REUTERS/ Mariana Bazo

    Facebook and other Silicon Valley firms choose to comply with the requests of Washington and Tel Aviv to delete undesired accounts because they fear US and Israeli influential political elites, Philip Giraldi, a former CIA officer, has told Sputnik, adding that the practice, which he described as "illegal," has become routine.

    Glenn Greenwald's article is completely accurate, Philip Giraldi, a former counter-terrorism specialist and military intelligence officer at the CIA, told Sputnik, commenting on the Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist's recent op-ed which shed light on Facebook's controversial practice of blocking accounts of individuals at the request of the US and Israeli governments.
    "The blocking of accounts of people who are on lists maintained by the US government has become routine," Giraldi said. "It is also illegal as the account holders have broken no laws and are in compliance with the rules set up by the sites themselves."
    Greenwald raised the alarm over the supposed state censorship exercised by the social networking service against Palestinian activists and Russian officials.

    Citing Al Jazeera and The New York Times, the investigative journalist emphasized the alleged mutual consent reached by the Israeli government and Facebook which resulted in the closure of numerous accounts and pages of Palestinian individuals and media outlets deemed as "inciting violence."
    "That means that Israeli officials have virtually unfettered control over a key communications forum of Palestinians," Greenwald concluded, suggesting that at the same time "calls by Israelis for the killing of Palestinians are commonplace on Facebook, and largely remain undisturbed."
    According to the journalist, Facebook's decision to close the account of Ramzan Kadyrov, the leader of the Chechen Republic, Russia, is similarly "disturbing and dangerous." Greenwald highlighted that while the social media service claims that "Mr. Kadyrov's [Facebook and Instagram] accounts were deactivated because he had just been added to a United States sanctions list and that the company was legally obligated to act," Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro remains active on both platforms despite the fact he is on the same sanctions list.
    "Does anyone trust the Trump administration — or any other government — to compel social media platforms to delete and block anyone it wants to be silenced?" Greenwald asked rhetorically.
    The CIA veteran says that there is nothing new in what the investigative journalist is describing:
    "Those of us in the activist community have long been observing how some articles have been blocked or made to disappear."
    "Israel and Jewish groups in the United States have led discussions with Facebook, Google and other sites to restrict what they choose to describe as hate speech. They have been successful, obtaining the agreement of those companies to set up standards that will in effect limit any criticisms of Israel and permit criticism of the Palestinians and other Arabs," Giraldi explained.
    He noted that
    "the companies can, in fact, do what they want as they are private entities. However, "if the public begins to understand that they are cooperating with governments to censor their product it will hurt their bottom lines as advertisers will go elsewhere," he pointed out.
    Commenting on what is behind the Silicon Valley giant's apparent pliability to Washington and Tel Aviv, the ex-CIA officer opined that
    "the companies for the most part go along with Israel and the US government because they are fearful that the US government will intervene to regulate the system."
    "In the case of Israel, they fear lawsuits from Israel's many and powerful friends in the United States," Giraldi suggested.
    Regardless of Donald Trump's assuming office, the United States government has been doing much of the same since the time of the Obama administration, the former intelligence official underscored.


    Related:
    Pulitzer Winner Exposes Facebook's 'Disturbing, Dangerous Censorship Rampage' at US & Israel's Behest

    Ex-CIA Officer Explains Why US Media Inflates Impact of Facebook 'Russian Ads'

    State Censorship? Silicon Valley Giants Playing Own Game With Trump Administration, Israel
    Last edited by Hervé; 2nd January 2018 at 14:30.
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    From The New York Post, yesterday:

    Too much time on Facebook is ruining your mental health

    Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg wants to prioritize family and friends over brands. But, he says, that could result in lower user engagement. That’s potentially bad news for investors, but could be good news for excessive Facebook users.

    “We’re making a major change to how we build Facebook,” Zuckerberg announced in a blog post on Thursday. “I’m changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions.”

    He added, “By making these changes, I expect the time people spend on Facebook and some measures of engagement will go down. But I also expect the time you do spend on Facebook will be more valuable.”

    Facebook’s 2 billion users can’t seem to get enough of themselves — or each other. People stay connected with friends and family near and far, share intimate photos, reconnect with friends from college and high school and even rekindle relationships. Last year, the most popular social network on the planet even rolled out an artificial intelligence suicide prevention program. It aims to detect posts or live videos in which someone might be expressing thoughts of suicide.

    But a slew of other studies have said too much Facebook is bad for you. Here are some of the effects of excessive engagement on the site:

    So how much time do people spend on Facebook?

    American users spend an average of 50 minutes a day browsing Facebook, Instagram and Messenger, the company has said. And all that time adds up. Marketing site Mediakix calculated all the time spent online for an average user with Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram and YouTube. Over the course of a person’s life, they would spend 5 years and 4 months on social media instead of interacting with the real world. That only comes second to the 7 years and 8 months people spend watching television in their lifetime.

    How does all of that endless scrolling make you feel?

    “The use of Facebook was negatively associated with overall well-being,” a 2017 study by researchers at Global Public Health at UC San Diego and Human Nature Lab at Yale University found. “These results were particularly strong for mental health; most measures of Facebook use in one year predicted a decrease in mental health in a later year. We found consistently that both liking others’ content and clicking links significantly predicted a subsequent reduction in self-reported physical health, mental health and life satisfaction.”

    The researchers looked at data from more than 5,200 adults and examined how their well-being changed depending on their Facebook usage. They looked at life satisfaction, self-reported mental health, self-reported physical health and body-mass index. They measured Facebook use in terms of liking other people’s posts, creating one’s own posts and clicking on links. The researchers then compared this to “real-world social networks” or four friends with whom they spent their free time. Each person could pick up to eight people.

    What does excessive Facebook use do to your personality?

    This 2017 study published in “Behavioral Brain Research” looked at 62 participants over a five-week period and found that a higher daily frequency of checking Facebook was “robustly linked” with smaller gray matter in the nucleus accumbens, which is located in the area of the hypothalamus. This is one area of the brain associated with rewards and, research shows, “has been implicated in aspects of human drug addiction, including the ability of drug-paired cues to control behavior.” In other words, there’s a theory as to why some people say checking Facebook is addictive.

    That’s the question this 2014 study asked. These findings are supported by yet another study published the previous year in “Social Networking,” a quarterly academic journal. Posting, tagging and commenting on photos on Facebook were associated with respondents’ self-reported narcissism for both men and women. And posting frequent status updates and sharing links with a greater frequency were specifically linked with more narcissistic tendencies in women. The participants were rated on the Narcissistic Personality Index, a standard psychological test.

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    As someone who has been genuinely involved with IT, and the WWW since 1996 I have made a comprehensive study of the internet as a whole. I have made my living from my understanding and abilities with IT- I can provide my full credentials for anyone who is interested.

    For me the internet has the potential to completely remove the old power elite, I think we simply don't understand the internet as a society, to me it seems people take it very much for granted already, and they barely know anything about it, and its full potential.

    We have a global network. Tim Berners-Lee enabled us to access the power of this network through his invention of linked pages, literally the world-wide-web. He gained no monetary return on his invention, he donated it to humanity. We are ingrates, and dopes if we do not understand the great gift that the internet is.

    Communications, this is the principal currency of the internet. We can reach highly specific groups of people on a global scale. This used to be forbidden. Only the favored, mass-media barons had the power to do this, and it used to cost millions!

    The mistake we have made, and this is significant, is that we have allowed the same dominance to arise, the same monopolies which gained their power in the 'Broadcast era' to gain communications power through our own stupidity, and sheep-like tendencies.

    So, the private ownership of large internet concerns have both shielded it from official control, but also provided the means for us to be once again dominated by wealthy groups & investor power blocs.

    The situation is, we can still claw this power back, the wheels are still very much in motion, but we must understand the true nature of the internet, that it allows us to build, and promote our own projects.

    The market works to determine if you are successful, but unless you try, and execute on ideas, nothing happens.

    Social media, and Facebook is now the largest company/platform is enormously powerful. We have shifted something which was considered 'unshiftable' with it.

    The geo/political events since 2016 have finally alerted the power/elite to the real power of alternative/internet based communications. It is up to us to recognize this potential, this latent power and build our own media, promote our own ideas.

    Facebook might be all that people are saying, but it is powerful, and it represents a model which we could leverage, we are not powerless, we are not helpless. We can access and use the internet.

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Well FB finally pulled me in. I joined fb last week just to find and check up on old friends and family but i already want to leave. So much drama and i only have 16 friends so far.I also dont know FB edicate. Like if someone likes my posts or pics, am I required to like thiers? Plus i find some of the language they use abysmal & raunchy. Not all my friends just some & their friends.plus all the lying, boasting and neediness that takes place.

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    United States Avalon Member Valerie Villars's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Quote Posted by jagman (here)
    Well FB finally pulled me in. I joined fb last week just to find and check up on old friends and family but i already want to leave. So much drama and i only have 16 friends so far.I also dont know FB edicate. Like if someone likes my posts or pics, am I required to like thiers? Plus i find some of the language they use abysmal & raunchy. Not all my friends just some & their friends.plus all the lying, boasting and neediness that takes place.
    The biggest lie in your facebook face is that almost everyone is 25 in their photos, with stellar bodies, even when they're 55. It's ridiculous.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Quote Posted by Valerie Villars (here)
    The easiest way to revolutionize society and get rid of Facebook would be to pull the plug. Literally. If there is no electricity, there is no Facebook. That's why books are so valuable.
    I'm in book heaven.

    If the plug got pulled, I'd just read more than I already do. I was collecting and reading books for 3.5 years with no internet except for coffee shop visits.

    My time on FB would not change...ZERO time now; ZERO time then.

    I just like PA and email.

    Other than that, reading, writing, walking, bike riding, visiting with friends, prayer and meditation time.

    It's peaceful. I feel good.

    I've been told by a few how valuable FB is like for marketing and stuff, but I just don't feel like going there.

    The info on this thread is confirmation for that choice.

    Yay! Books!
    MM
    ~*~ "The best way to predict the future is to create it." - Peter Drucker ~*~ “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children...to leave the world a better place...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson ~*~ "Creative minds always have been known to survive any kind of bad training." - Anna Freud ~*~

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Quote Posted by LadyM (here)
    Quote Posted by latte (here)
    That reminds me of an old, now defunct website called f***microsoft.com from 2003 or 04 perhaps. It was a very disgruntled ex-employee that said he knew for certain that when updating windows that MS would scan your Documents folder. He also mentioned some files that could be removed from windows libraries that would prove and stop this. He advised to place all documents in your own created folder rather than the MS provided official "Documents" folder, and many others tidbits of info long forgotten.

    He also mentioned that Windows had a 'backdoor' for govt agencies from Win95 on, and other systems quickly added them. It's everywhere as we know by now.

    BTW, I tried the cat food test only I mentioned dog food several times. I stated seeing dog food ads after 2 days.

    Quote Posted by LadyM (here)

    Although not related to Facebook but definitely connected to your post, Microsoft must be spying on our written words too. Why do I think this? A couple of years ago, I had an OBE in which I came out of some underground passage way (or portal), along with a small group of others in Dubai City. Mind you, at that time, I knew almost zero about this city. At one point in my experience, I am trying to find Burj Khalifa, the city's tallest building, which, like the city, I knew almost nothing about -- not even its name -- up until this experience. But I am having trouble seeing it. It was very foggy, making it hard for me to see anything.

    After the experience, I recorded what I remembered in my journal, which is a MS Word document. One day maybe a year later, after getting the Windows 10 update for the first time, the background image on the password/sign-in screen showed a photo of a modern city with tall skyscrapers shrouded in fog. It was an aerial photo, probably taken from a helicopter. It looked familiar, and, after digging, I discovered it was Dubai City. Only within the last few months have I questioned how and why I was delivered that photo. Something reading my journal?
    Thank you, Latte. Good to know info.
    Wow, I never heard that before, but I've never used their documents folder. I set up my own file management system. I don't use their "libraries" either.

    More confirmation.

    Weird about your journal entry and that picture, LadyM.

    I never had the false notion of any sort of privacy, and I don't allow automatic updates. Supposedly updates are good, but I've always had mixed feelings about them.

    Thanks for this info.
    MM
    ~*~ "The best way to predict the future is to create it." - Peter Drucker ~*~ “To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children...to leave the world a better place...to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. This is to have succeeded.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson ~*~ "Creative minds always have been known to survive any kind of bad training." - Anna Freud ~*~

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    I deleted my facebook acc but they said that it would take 14 days. They also said my account would be deactivated immediately but i could log in during the 14 days if i decided tochange my mind. Man those ppl just wont let you go!

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  29. Link to Post #155
    United States Avalon Member Valerie Villars's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Quote Posted by Michelle Marie (here)
    Quote Posted by Valerie Villars (here)
    The easiest way to revolutionize society and get rid of Facebook would be to pull the plug. Literally. If there is no electricity, there is no Facebook. That's why books are so valuable.
    I'm in book heaven.

    If the plug got pulled, I'd just read more than I already do. I was collecting and reading books for 3.5 years with no internet except for coffee shop visits.

    My time on FB would not change...ZERO time now; ZERO time then.

    I just like PA and email.

    Other than that, reading, writing, walking, bike riding, visiting with friends, prayer and meditation time.

    It's peaceful. I feel good.

    I've been told by a few how valuable FB is like for marketing and stuff, but I just don't feel like going there.

    The info on this thread is confirmation for that choice.

    Yay! Books!
    MM
    Me too MM. I had to move my VERY extensive library of books and albums, which I started collecting in the 70's, recently. Those items are the biggest pain and the hardest things to move, but I REFUSE to let my books and albums go. My books have always been my best friends. I have a penchant for older, (like 100 years old books) and I have found some astonishing information in some of them. Talk about lost knowledge.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    United States Avalon Member Foxie Loxie's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Let's hear it for Libraries & books!! Why do you think libraries have been burned or buried down through the centuries?!!

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    United States Avalon Member Valerie Villars's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    There is something else books have they don't want you to know. Books, ink on paper, often have a spiritual light which infuses the reader. The computer doesn't have it. It goes way back to the original God. Not all the b.s. gods they keep trying to shove down our throats. If trees hold energy, then so do pages of paper and ink. And the words can't be changed in the older books, after the fact. Sort of a reverse mandela effect.
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone when we are uncool." From the movie "Almost Famous""l "Let yourself stand cool and composed before a million universes." Walt Whitman

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    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    Download your Facebook user data - you will be surprised by how much informaton they have about you.

    RT
    Sun, 25 Mar 2018 10:19 UTC


    © Regis Duvignau / Reuters

    People are being encouraged to download their Facebook data following concerns about the information the social media giant collects on its users. It seems to include phone calls, text messages and other non-Facebook activity.

    New Zealand software developer Dylan McKay highlighted the issue after he downloaded his data from Facebook and found that the company had recorded his text and call data. McKay posted the information to his Twitter feed.

    Quote
    Dylan McKay‏ @dylanmckaynz

    Downloaded my facebook data as a ZIP file Somehow it has my entire call history with my partner's mum


    1:04 AM - 21 Mar 2018
    1,596 replies 38,146 retweets 49,137 likes
    The New Zealander said he became curious about how much of his private information the platform had stored following allegations that Cambridge Analytica used the personal data of 50 million Facebook users to target voters during the US presidential election in 2016. Trawling through his files, McKay learned that Facebook had about two years' worth of phone call metadata from his Android phone.

    Quote
    Dylan McKay‏ @dylanmckaynz Mar 21

    Downloaded my facebook data as a ZIP file Somehow it has my entire call history with my partner's mum


    1,596 replies 38,147 retweets 49,140 likes


    Dylan McKay‏ @dylanmckaynz Mar 21

    a historical record of every single contact on my phone, including ones I no longer have


    40 replies 2,422 retweets 4,303 likes


    Dylan McKay‏ @dylanmckaynz

    metadata about every text message I've ever received or sent spoiler: I don't use messenger for SMS






    1:07 AM - 21 Mar 2018
    58 replies 2,657 retweets 4,701 likes
    The furor led Julian Assange to post instructions Saturday about how to access the data online. In a follow-up post, the WikiLeaks founder called the company's CEO Mark Zuckerberg a "megalomaniac" and told his followers he had deleted his Facebook account, and then said he never had one to begin with.

    Quote
    Julian Assange‏ @JulianAssange

    What to see what Facebook has on you (at a minimum)?
    1. Goto https://facebook.com/settings
    2. Click "Download a copy of your Facebook data"
    3. Wait for automatic email from Facebook
    4. Download the ZIP file link in the email
    5. Extract it and open 'html/index.htm'
    12:30 AM - 24 Mar 2018
    362 replies 7,980 retweets 8,786 likes
    Many people are now taking to Twitter to express their shock after downloading their own data. Some said they were dismayed at the level of detail Facebook had collected about their lives, including logged calls with people who don't have Facebook profiles. However, others were less sympathetic.

    Quote Emma Kennedy‏Verified account @EmmaKennedy

    I’ve just looked at the data files I requested from Facebook and they had every single phone number in my contacts. They had every single social event I went to, a list of all my friends (and their birthdays) and a list of every text I’ve sent.
    12:37 AM - 25 Mar 2018
    119 replies 806 retweets 669 likes
    Speaking to Ars Technica, Facebook said that phone contacts are uploaded to the messaging or social app after it is downloaded. The app also explicitly requests permission for access. "It's a widely used practice to begin by uploading your phone contacts," a spokesperson for the firm told the website..

    Some on social media have pointed out that Facebook asks for permission to upload your contacts to the app and this could explain the level of data contained in the downloads. However that in turn raises a separate question, if one user gives permission for their contacts to be uploaded, what does that mean for those people whose details are filed as a result? RT.com has contacted Facebook for comment.

    In the wake of this latest revelation the finger's also being pointed at Google, accusing the company of deliberately not fixing a number of known security issues with Android phones. In November, a Quartz report claimed that Google still collects the location data of Android phone users even if they turn off their location services settings, take out their SIM card or restore their device to factory settings.

    Quote
    Matthew Green‏ @matthew_d_green 20h20 hours ago
    An underreported detail from these “I got my Facebook data” stories: combining Facebook with the (non)-privacy-protections of Android is like setting wild dogs loose on a buffet.
    14 replies 295 retweets 489 likes

    Matthew Green‏ @matthew_d_green 20h20 hours ago
    There’s a difference between intentional data harvesting and just severe negligence in protecting your customers, but Google still bears a little responsibility for allowing Android to become such a privacy nightmare.

    9 replies 118 retweets 238 likes

    Matthew Green‏ @matthew_d_green 20h20 hours ago
    I’m also a little bit unclear about *why* Google allowed this. They can’t have been unaware that one of their most popular apps was harvesting and uploading call and SMS history to Facebook’s servers. I refuse to believe that.

    15 replies 121 retweets 216 likes

    Matthew Green‏ @matthew_d_green
    Which means this wasn’t just a question of Google accidentally leaving (every) barn door open. It was a willful decision to leave this door open while the horses streamed out two by two.

    2:19 PM - 24 Mar 2018
    10 replies 64 retweets 136 likes
    Facebook is also not the only app accused of surreptitiously collecting its users' data. Last year, a joint study from Yale Privacy Lab and French non-profit research group Exodus Privacy, found that there were 25 trackers hidden in popular Google Play apps such as Uber, Tinder, Skype, Twitter, Spotify and Snapchat.
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    A couple of days ago they passed the Cloud Act :
    This week, Senators Hatch, Graham, Coons, and Whitehouse introduced a bill that diminishes the data privacy of people around the world.

    The Clarifying Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act expands American and foreign law enforcement’s ability to target and access people’s data across international borders in two ways. First, the bill creates an explicit provision for U.S. law enforcement (from a local police department to federal agents in Immigration and Customs Enforcement) to access “the contents of a wire or electronic communication and any record or other information” about a person regardless of where they live or where that information is located on the globe. In other words, U.S. police could compel a service provider—like Google, Facebook, or Snapchat—to hand over a user’s content and metadata, even if it is stored in a foreign country, without following that foreign country’s privacy laws.[1]

    Second, the bill would allow the President to enter into “executive agreements” with foreign governments that would allow each government to acquire users’ data stored in the other country, without following each other’s privacy laws.

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/0...ss-border-data
    Last edited by ramus; 25th March 2018 at 21:59.

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    United States Avalon Member onawah's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Problems with Facebook

    I tried this:
    What to see what Facebook has on you (at a minimum)?
    1. Goto https://facebook.com/settings
    2. Click "Download a copy of your Facebook data"
    3. Wait for automatic email from Facebook
    4. Download the ZIP file link in the email
    5. Extract it and open 'html/index.htm'
    and so far, it hasn't worked. I also tried doing it from my Facebook page, clicking Settings, then "Download a copy of your Facebook data', but it just went around in circles, with no data shown. ???
    Each breath a gift...
    _____________

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