+ Reply to Thread
Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst 1 7 17
Results 321 to 325 of 325

Thread: Ça Chauffe!

  1. Link to Post #321
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,032 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Ça Chauffe!

    National Secretary of Firefighter Union: Many firefighters are ready to join Yellow Vests

    Sputnik
    Tue, 19 Nov 2019 07:51 UTC

    French professional firefighters are seeking to expand their protest movement with a new series of actions starting in the first week of December, says Remy Chabbouh, national secretary of the Firefighter Union of the South. He has explained why many of his colleagues want to join the yellow vests.


    Yellow Vests' Protest © Sputnik

    On 16 November, the yellow vests took to the streets marking the first anniversary of the movement that was triggered by the proposed hike in fuel prices and swiftly morphed into a nation-wide action against Paris' economic policies, tax reforms, and social inequalities.

    The protesters were confronted by riot police using tear gas and water cannons. Over 100 people were arrested in Paris, where violent rioters smashed windows and ransacked historical monuments.

    The year-long protests forced the government into taking conciliatory measures, announced by French President Emmanuel Macron in April 2019. The proposed measures included the elimination of the fuel tax that became the trigger for the protests, middle-class tax cuts, increasing scrutiny of tax evasion schemes and reinvestment the country's in local administrations. However, the concessions failed to upend the protest movement.

    Meanwhile, on 14 November, thousands of healthcare workers took to the streets in France's capital and other cities with the slogan "Save public hospitals" being joined by French professional firefighters who have been protesting for several months. In June 2019 seven unions, representing 85 percent of the professional firefighters informed France's Interior Minister Christophe Castaner about the forthcoming action citing problems with the emergency services.

    Remy Chabbouh, national secretary of the firefighter union of the South, says that many of his colleagues want to join the yellow vests, since the freedom of action of traditional unions is now limited by French laws.

    Sputnik France: You are protesting with healthcare workers today. Are we witnessing the convergence of struggles?

    Remy Chabbouh: Yes, we hope so. Both healthcare workers and firefighters belong to a specific category, we operate in parallel. We face the same personnel and financial constraints. When firefighters attend to an emergency it is directed by the Emergency Medical Services, subordinated to the Regional Health Agency (ARS). Firefighters and healthcare personnel have common colleagues including nurses, medical assistants, doctors or emergency doctors.

    Sputnik France: You say that the government did not take into consideration your demands voiced at the national demonstration of 15 October. You believe that the time has come to utilise the other modes of action. Which ones in particular?

    Remy Chabbouh: For our part, today's demonstration was the last one in its traditional sense when an application is submitted to the prefecture with regard to the demonstrators' movement from point A to point B. We are going to resort to other modes of action starting in early December. Being an organiser, I can tell you about them. We intend to hold a protracted demonstration (for several days or even weeks) in one of the Parisian squares. We will embark on it from 2 December to 6 December and intend to settle there for a long time with tents and folding beds. This is a new form of struggle aimed at bringing together representatives of the professions that face the same problems as we do, as well as the general population. Having a sort of a static tent city will allow us to increase the amount of protesters starting with about 70 firefighters. And then we hope that 200, 300, or even a thousand people and maybe even more will take part in our action.

    Sputnik France: On November 16, the yellow vests marked the first anniversary of the movement. They call upon representatives of all the social strata to join them. Will firefighters respond to this call?

    Remy Chabbouh: Indeed, a certain part of firefighters believe that the demands of trade unions are no longer taken into account. When one snubs trade unions and does not listen to them, some of our colleagues take the path of radicalisation and chose to proceed with other forms of action. Today, many firefighters want to join the yellow vests which enjoy a freedom of action that the unions do not have anymore. It is necessary to inform the authorities about the demonstration and its actual route several days before the event takes place. Today, unpredictability is the key to effective action. Yellow vests proved it. So yes, many firefighters are ready to join the yellow vests. The authorities would have shown common sense by raising the prestige of trade unions and federations. This would have facilitated dialogue at a higher level, because right now, it's a real mess.
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  2. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    avid (19th November 2019), Bill Ryan (19th November 2019), BMJ (21st November 2019), Cara (19th November 2019), Dennis Leahy (21st November 2019), Franny (28th November 2019), Gracy May (19th November 2019), kfm27917 (19th November 2019), mountain_jim (19th November 2019)

  3. Link to Post #322
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,032 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Ça Chauffe!

    Yellow Vests reach 1 year: The redemption of France’s revolutionary spirit

    by Ramin Mazaheri for The Saker Blog (cross-posted with PressTV)
    November 20, 2019
    (Ramin Mazaheri is the chief correspondent in Paris for Press TV and has lived in France since 2009. He has been a daily newspaper reporter in the US, and has reported from Iran, Cuba, Egypt, Tunisia, South Korea and elsewhere. He is the author of the books ‘I’ll Ruin Everything You Are: Ending Western Propaganda on Red China’ and the upcoming ‘Socialism’s Ignored Success: Iranian Islamic Socialism’.)

    For many years to come France will be divided into two periods – before the Yellow Vests, and after the Yellow Vests. It’s widely believed in France that things can never go back to the way they were.

    I’m not sure there can be a better yardstick of domestic success – a better gauge of sociocultural impact – than that?

    Outside of France the Yellow Vests have given the world a precious gift, and at a huge sacrifice: nobody will ever view “French-style democracy” with the respect their government arrogantly demands as the alleged “birthplace of human rights”. For a generation or longer, “What about the Yellow Vests?”, will be a conversation-ending question to anyone who claims the moral superiority of the “Western-style” political system.

    Systematic repression of the poorest classes are indeed “universal values”, but only within neoliberal and neo-imperial systems. Make no mistake: It has been one year of open Yellow Vest revolt against the economic dictates of that “neoliberal empire”, the European Union, and it’s neo-colonial puppet temporarily occupying Élysée Palace in Paris.

    What the last year has testified to is the redemption of France’s revolutionary spirit. Not every country has that, after all.

    England, for example, will foolishly “keep calm and carry on” – a perfect summation of change-hating conservatism – until the bitter end, always. This is why reading English-language media coverage of the Yellow Vests was so very similar – “English conservative opposes egalitarian movement in France”. They have been running the same story for 200+ years, going back to Edmund Burke, who founded modern Western conservatism with his (reactionary) Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790.

    France is not England, but 53 weeks ago I don’t think anyone imagined that the French could possibly muster the stamina, dedication and self-sacrifice to protest amid massive state-sponsored repression every weekend for one year.

    It’s an amazing achievement, and only those full of spite and hate could deny them a modest present of honest recognition on their birthday.

    But Western mainstream media coverage in English and French was just that – they claimed the Yellow Vests achieved nothing.

    One thing the French don’t like to be reminded of is: the French Revolution failed, and quickly. It’s as if they forget Emperor Napoleon?

    The French Revolution is not like the Iranian, Chinese or Cuban Revolutions, all of which have endured. The American Revolution has also endured – too bad that it was even more aristocratic (bourgeois) and sectarian than the French Revolution.

    But the French Revolution occurred in an era of constant regional imperialism, war, slavery, repression of women, religious and ethnic sectarianism, etc. – we would be wrong to say it did not still have positive worldwide ramifications in the most important realms of politics, economics, culture, etc. The USSR – the only empire based on affirmative action – also failed, but we would be wrong to say it didn’t also produce positive changes for their people and also worldwide.

    Quickly, here are a few tangible victories of the Yellow Vests: they prevented Emmanuel Macron from presenting a 10th consecutive annual austerity budget, they prevented Macron from de-nationalising the three airports of Paris, and the 10 billion euros in so-called “concessions” was credited with keeping French economic growth in the positive in the last quarter.

    However, even if the Yellow Vests have obviously not yet toppled the 5th Republic and set up a new order, their cultural is inestimable. Just as the Occupy Movement of the US in 2011 gave us the slogan and mentality of “We are the 99%”, so will the Yellow Vests stand for something equally conscience-raising.

    The Yellow Vests want a French Cultural Revolution, and should lead it
    However, a big difference between the two movements is that Occupy was led by many college-educated “do-gooders” – and God bless them – whereas the Yellow Vests are undoubtedly a movement of the most marginalised classes.

    Seemingly the most comprehensive survey thus far showed that few Vesters are unemployed, two-thirds of Vesters make less than the average national wage, and an even greater percentage regret a lack of cultural resources and social links. In other words: hard-working, (yet still) poor, isolated citizens who yearn for more cultural enrichment.

    This is why I have repeatedly drawn a different parallel: the Yellow Vests are essentially demanding a Cultural Revolution. Only China and Iran have ever had one, and both were state-sponsored.

    Cultural Revolutions put the values of the formerly-oppressed classes into power – everything is brought to a halt for perhaps years in order to engage in mass discussions, with the aim of drastically updating a nation’s democratic institutions and general culture in order to accord with modern political ideals. This is precisely what the Yellow Vests want: a long, comprehensive, democratic rethink and public debate over France’s inclusion in the European Union, the eurozone, NATO, and the Americanisation/neoliberalisation of their domestic policies.

    Chinese peasants, Iran’s “revolution of the barefooted” and the rural-based Yellow Vests – it’s impossible not to admit the parallels. The West, of course, only insists that both Cultural Revolutions were huge mistakes.

    Not true: China’s Cultural Revolution created the rural economic and human capital which laid the groundwork for their 1980s-onwards boom, although the West would have you believe its rebirth sprung only from Deng’s reforms; Iran’s Cultural Revolution swept away the elite’s oppressive aping of the West and created the first modern Muslim democracy.

    The Yellow Vests insist that they are the “real” France, and after a year of talking with them I agree – they know as much or more about politics than I do. Politics is not rocket science, after all, but mainly applying common morality to public policy and daily events.
    Iran and China already had a government inspired by socialist democracy (and not by aristocratic liberal democracy) when they embarked on their Cultural Revolutions, whereas France does not – thus the repression.

    What did the Occupy Movement “achieve”, after all? They prevented no bailouts, they folded after infinitely less state repression and there is no direct movement linked with them today. However, only a Burkean conservative would insist that the Occupy Movement didn’t wake many people up to the struggles of class warfare, and of egalitarian right and greedy wrong. It’s never mentioned in the Western media – which only adores far-right, nativist, anti-socialist movements like in Hong Kong – but Algerians have protested for 39 consecutive weekends as well.

    The Yellow Vests have not failed – they have much to celebrate on their birthday, and this article serves as a rare reminder of that reality.

    Iranian and Russian media – doing France’s job for them
    What’s important to note is that since late June – when France started going on summer vacation – Russian and Iranian media in Paris (including my Farsi- and Spanish-language colleagues) have been the only television journalists openly covering the Yellow Vest demonstrations.

    My French colleagues have done the most cowardly thing possible – they quit the field. For many months people in Paris couldn’t believe I had to work covering the Yellow Vests on Saturday: I repeatedly heard, “I thought they were finished?”

    With exceptions I can count on one hand, for many months French media has been either totally absent or hidden. There are certainly no reporters doing live interviews (even without a logo displaying whom they work for), even though the presence of live reporters inherently reduces the willingness of police to be violent. Considering the toll of violence – 11,000 arrested, 2,000 convicted, 1,000 imprisoned, 5,000 hurt,1,000 critically injured and the innumerable tear-gassings – it’s no wonder French people hate the media.

    In France the vast majority of media are private, with editorial lines decided by a handful of billionaires – that’s just how Western journalism works, sadly. “Free speech”, they call it. However, where are the public media – they are paid by taxpayer dollars to objectively cover their own nation?! Quite pathetic….

    This is probably why the Macron administration openly disparages Russia’s RT and Sputnik (we won’t get into their problems with PressTV here): we have spent the past year properly doing our jobs, unlike France’s media.

    That’s too bad for France, but the unexpected and undeniable accomplishments of the Yellow Vests speak for themselves. Who knows what they might achieve in year 2?
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  4. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (21st November 2019), BMJ (21st November 2019), Cara (21st November 2019), conk (22nd November 2019), Dennis Leahy (21st November 2019), Franny (28th November 2019), JRS (21st November 2019), mountain_jim (21st November 2019)

  5. Link to Post #323
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,032 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Ça Chauffe!

    Thousands of tractors plow through Berlin streets again in protest at new green regulations

    RT
    Tue, 26 Nov 2019 11:33 UTC


    © Ruptly

    Up to 5,000 tractors descended upon the German capital on Tuesday to protest the government's latest agricultural policies and environmental protection regulations which farmers claim are too restrictive.

    German authorities estimate somewhere in the region of 5,000 tractors and 10,000 farmers entered Berlin in a slow-moving convoy, bringing the capital to a relative standstill at certain points. The protesters eventually gathered at Berlin's iconic landmark Brandenburg Gate.

    Chancellor Angela Merkel's government made the proposals back in September to curb the use of pesticides and herbicides to better protect the country's insect populations, while also placing limits on the use of fertilizers to protect Germany's groundwater.

    Quote
    Natalia Smolentceva @ananats

    Morning at the Brandenburg Gate. Around a hundred of farmers is here already to demonstrate against government's agricultural policies. Organisers expect 5000 tractors from all over Germany in the afternoon

    10:47 AM - Nov 26, 2019
    Disgruntled farmers feel there should be consultation and cooperation between conservationists, environmentalists, farmers and the government to create policies that are effective at protecting the environment while maintaining German agricultural competitiveness.

    While Merkel agreed in principle and talks are scheduled to begin at the start of December, these are not the first such protests by farmers in recent weeks.

    Hamburg witnessed a similar demonstration of slow-moving outrage earlier this month.


    © REUTERS/Annegret Hilse
    Ruptly
    890K subscribers

    Ruptly is live from Berlin on Tuesday, November 26 as farmers drive through the streets of the German capital to rally against the country’s environmental, agricultural, and trade policy.

    The protest comes after the government of German Chancellor Angela Merkel introduced a new package of regulations phasing out the weedkiller glyphosate in the next four years.

    Farmers from other European countries such as France and the Netherlands have been taking part in similar protests in recent weeks.
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  6. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (27th November 2019), BMJ (29th November 2019), Cara (27th November 2019), Franny (28th November 2019), mountain_jim (30th November 2019), Valerie Villars (28th November 2019)

  7. Link to Post #324
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,032 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Ça Chauffe!

    Irate French farmers descend on Paris in 1,000-strong tractor convoy to protest EU regulations (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

    RT
    27 Nov, 2019 10:47
    Updated 3 hours ago
    Get short URL


    © REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

    Roughly one thousand tractors have descended on Paris as French farmers protest against government policies and international trade agreements which they say are impacting their bottom line and thus their quality of life.

    The frustrated farmers are assembling at Avenue Foch, near the Champs Elysees and the Arc de Triomphe.

    LIVE: Farmers’ unions protest government and media in Paris
    The protest was organized by the two main farmers’ unions who have called for a joint meeting with President Emmanuel Macron to discuss his policies, which they claim are hurting the agricultural sector.


    © REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

    The farmers are also complaining of widespread “agri-bashing” in the media and political spheres, in which the agricultural industry has become the sacrificial lamb for environmental issues.

    Vegan activists have reportedly attacked farms and butcher’s shops amid animal welfare concerns, and environmental groups have criticized the use of the weedkiller glyphosate, calling for it to be banned.


    © REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

    Macron has expressed interest in banning the weedkiller by 2021, which would go beyond current EU regulation.

    France is the largest agricultural producer in the EU, and its farmers are irate over the bloc’s trade deals with the likes of Canada and the Mercosur bloc in South America, which they say will flood the European market with cheaper goods at lower standards.

    Similar protests have been held across Europe in recent days.
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  8. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (27th November 2019), BMJ (29th November 2019), Cara (27th November 2019), Franny (28th November 2019), mountain_jim (30th November 2019), Valerie Villars (28th November 2019)

  9. Link to Post #325
    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th March 2011
    Location
    Brittany
    Posts
    16,766
    Thanks
    60,316
    Thanked 95,032 times in 15,475 posts

    Default Re: Ça Chauffe!

    France's nationwide strike starts December 5th, set to be the biggest in decades

    Alex Ledsom Forbes
    Mon, 02 Dec 2019 15:32 UTC


    A hospital employee wears a blouse reading "on strike" on November 14, 2019 in Quimper, western France. © AFP via Getty Images

    Even for a country with a reputation for strikes, France's planned walkouts on Thursday, December 5, could be the biggest the country has seen in years; many are predicting the country could come to an actual standstill. What's more, the strikes may last weeks.

    Who exactly is going on strike?

    According to The Connection, the strike is expected to start at 10pm on Wednesday, December 4, when workers at SNCF (France's national rail company) and RATP (Paris' regional transport authority) officially walk out. Air France air and ground crews will be on strike, making flights in and out of French airports difficult, notably because air traffic controllers will also walk out. Public travel generally will be made even more difficult by today's announcement by lorry drivers that they intend to blockade major French roads from December 7 onwards. French people, reliant on cars to get to work have started stocking up on cans of petrol to have as a fall back in case garages run dry due to issues with delivery.

    Postal workers and other public service staff are expected to protest-three teaching unions have given the Ministry of Education formal notice of their intention to strike. The police intend to hold action in support of the strikes from 10am to 3pm across all police services and won't take part in additional airport or motorway checks throughout the day.

    Ambulance drivers and hospital workers - who were on strike last week -will likely join the fray and recent striking firefighters might be added to the mix. The strike also has the support of the Gilets Jaunes movement, which has taken to the streets every weekend for the past year. One barristers union is also in favour, calling December 5, "a day for dead justice".


    Firefighters demonstrate on November 14, 2019 outside the prefecture building in Lille, northern France © AFP via Getty Images

    Why are they on strike?
    The strike is against the French government's proposed pension reforms. President Macron wishes to streamline the current pension system comprising 42 separate regimes into a single operating system. The new system would introduce a "points system" of retirement, which threatens the current early retirement age of many public service workers.

    More importantly for the protesters, the reforms would impact how much money they receive. Currently, public sector workers' pensions are calculated on the salary they earned for the last six months of working life - which is usually the highest for most people - and they are also assessed on the 25 best years of their working life. The new system will take every year into account, meaning that people who worked on lower salaries for years or had periods of unemployment, will see that translate into a lower pension.


    SNCF Railway workers protest in front of the headquarters of SNCF in Saint-Denis, near Paris, on October 29, 2019. © AFP via Getty Images

    How is this strike different from others?
    The first smaller strike on September 13 was dubbed "Black Friday" and brought Parisian streets to a standstill, with some tailbacks trailing as far as 200km (125 miles). However, people generally seem to believe this will be much, much bigger. Firstly, in size, as it includes all union members across the major sectors comprising public life. Secondly, the five large trade unions in the RATP (Paris transport network) have called for "unlimited strikes" and want this to be only the first, so it's likely to continue. Many unions have warned that strikes might run until Christmas. Thirdly, because of the stakes. French workers have been fighting the government against pension reforms since 1995 when Jacques Chirac tried to change the system; the proposed reform at that time, according to The Local, brought people to the streets in a way that hadn't been seen since the spring of discontent in May 1968. After weeks of protest at the government threatening to increase the age of retirement, the plan was dropped. The new plans are much more severe.


    Farmers stand next to tractors, in Laon, northern France, on October 8, 2019, during a demonstration © AFP via Getty Images

    A recent poll in La Tribune suggested that 60% of the general public is in favour and believe that the government avance en terrain miné-that is to say, faces a mine field fighting the weight of public opinion. Detractors believe the public might shift its opinion when airports and train tracks lay empty and daily lives become affected. It's really a case of who blinks first; people feel strongly but President Macron has staked his political reputation on the outcome. And the French are used to fighting for a cause. A European Trade Union Institute study found that between 2010 and 2017, French strike days were 125 per 1,000 employees, compared to 20 in the U.K., 17 in Germany and 3 in Sweden.
    SOTT Comment:
    Discontent with government cut backs is not limited to France, many countries within the EU, and elsewhere, are seeing a similar collapse in the overall quality of life; the difference in France seems to be that its citizens are taking the risk to push back.

    It would appear that while Macron's government did manage to smear and suppress the Gilet Jaunes movement to some extent, that hasn't quelled the overall feeling that the lives of citizens are being sacrificed for government ideology.
    Related:
    "La réalité est un rêve que l'on fait atterrir" San Antonio AKA F. Dard

    Troll-hood motto: Never, ever, however, whatsoever, to anyone, a point concede.

  10. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Hervé For This Post:

    avid (3rd December 2019), Bill Ryan (3rd December 2019), BMJ (3rd December 2019), Cara (4th December 2019), Franny (3rd December 2019), Philippe (3rd December 2019)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 17 of 17 FirstFirst 1 7 17

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts