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    Default Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Though a solo fortress of solitude has its appeal as the time of Chaos approacheth, my druthers lead me to find convivial and compatible compatriots to form a cooperative community, and build a fortified village.

    One such possible design is the ring village - a dual ring village.

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/ring_life/info

    Imagine a line of mixed use buildings - something like the 1890s in New York City. Stores on the street level, with apartments above. Take that line and wrap into a circle. Take another line of buildings, and wrap that into a circle, placed within the first circle. The result : two circular buildings, a ring street between them, and a round park. . . a dual ring village. One more embellishment - construct continuous balconies at each upper level - not unlike the French Quarter in New Orleans.

    Obvious benefits : consolidated population, proximity to vocations, retail, services, social access, a large central park, access to a roof deck garden, and inherent security controlled by the gateway. Easy access around, up and down the ring, via the balconies, etc., and reduced overcrowding on the ground level.

    Engineering benefits : curved walls are stronger, use less materials, shared walls reduce exposure to the elements, curved walls deflect winds, and resist side forces (earthquakes). If the exterior ring wall is constructed as a substantial barrier, it would also offer protection from storm surge, flash floods, and mudslides. Security from flooding is dependent on wall height.

    Alternative View benefits : The roof deck garden and balcony planters, as well as the central park, conserve more green space than most other high density population designs. Depending on the size and resources of the DRV, may reduce or eliminate the necessity for owning an automobile.

    The drawbacks : A DRV has to be designed and built as a monolithic unit, not incrementally. This design also flies in the face of convention, thus is unattractive to the "powers that be." Worse, it fosters a rebellious independence of the Ringers. (Chinese Hakka Tulous are a good example). It is also not designed to expand, other than adding layers, which may not be feasible (shading factor, etc). Generally, population growth will need to be dealt with by building additional DRVs

    Of course, a small group might just build one ring (the inner), and as need arises, build the second (outer) ring. Then add a ring to the inner, facing the ring road.

    I am not a civil engineer, but rough guesstimates run about $5000 to $7000 initial cost per charter member, assuming about 150 - 250 Ringers... about a million or so green bux.

    Based on Dunbar's number, 150 - 250 population is about optimal for a close knit community.
    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...s/messages/216

    Options and variations :
    Fortress, Castle, Clan home, Autonomous agricultural station, artist colony, university, country club, building society, assisted living home, scholar's pub, historical re-enactment, theme park, polyclinic, hospice, commercial headquarters, shopping center, food court, religious retreat, manufacturing, arts & crafts, retail, customization and embellishment, and / or Hobbiton.


    DISASTER RESISTANCE

    Can you think of any other particular village / house design that can endure :
    __ Hurricanes, with storm surge, flying debris;
    __ Tornadoes, high wind and flying debris;
    __ Flooding, ice dams, rainfall, tsunamis;
    __ Mudslides;
    __ Blizzards, snowstorms, with high drifts;
    __ Ash fall (from volcanic eruptions);
    __ Forest fires, grass fires;
    __ Earthquake, meteor shockwave;
    __ Vermin, insects, mold, mildew, pests, pestilence;
    __ Weather extremes (extreme heat; bitter cold).

    The highest documented storm surge in the U.S. occurred in 2005 during Hurricane Katrina, when Pass Christian, MS, recorded a 27.8 foot (8.47 m) storm surge above mean sea level. The highest High Water Mark on record for a U.S. hurricane occurred in Biloxi, MS during Katrina, where a High Water Mark of 34.1 feet (10.39 m) above mean sea level was recorded on the outside of the Beau Rivage Lighthouse. The surge was 22 feet high in Biloxi, so the combination of the tide (about 1 foot) and 11-foot waves on top of the storm surge created the 34.1-foot high water mark. A four to five story DRV would appear to be capable of offering refuge from such surges. In retrospect, if the Gulf area had been built of DRVs with their own intrinsic levee, there would have been little flood damage to speak of, and no loss of life.

    If the ring village was constructed of 2m (6.56 ft) thick rammed earth walls (not unlike the Chinese Hakka Tulou) with ferrocement skins (modern touch), they would be fairly immune from water, blizzards, vermin, pests, wind, flying debris, small arms fire, earthquakes, shock waves from exploding meteors, and sky shine (gamma radiation from nuke). There is historical evidence that tulous endured earthquakes - some cracking - but the cracks self healed. (Hakka people also withstood sieges and raids from Japanese pirates, but that's before cannon). I can't find corroboration, but I read somewhere that the unbreechable walls of Troy were only 40 feet tall... which post-SHTF, may be more than enough to stop mutant zombie biker gangs on rampage.


    Chinese Hakka Tulou:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulou
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujian_Tulou
    The secret of life is that there is no secret of life.

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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    The Necessity for DRVs
    =\=\=\=
    As population keeps increasing, the only option we have is to increase population density. Unfortunately, the “old school” urban designs are ridiculously wasteful as well as miserable for most occupants who do not enjoy the “luxury” accommodations.
    : : : :
    Population density references - - -
    New York City = 42.6 / acre.
    Hong Kong = 25.7 / acre.
    Mexico City = 23.2 / acre.
    : : : :
    Thought Experiment

    Using the 10 acre square equivalent for a “city block,” we can inscribe a dual ring village within.
    Square Block 10 Acres 4.05 Hectares
    Side Length 660 Feet 201.17 Meters
    Road Width 18 Feet 5.49 Meters
    Ring2 Width 40 Feet 12.19 Meters
    Balcony2 Width 6 Feet 1.83 Meters
    Circle St. Width 18 Feet 5.49 Meters
    Balcony1 Width 6 Feet 1.83 Meters
    Ring1 Width 40 Feet 12.19 Meters
    Balcony0 Width 6 Feet 1.83 Meters

    Dependent Variables
    Road Radius 312 Feet 95.10 Meters
    Ring2 Radius 272 Feet 82.91 Meters
    Balcony2 Radius 266 Feet 81.08 Meters
    Circle St. Radius 248 Feet 75.59 Meters
    Balcony1 Radius 242 Feet 73.76 Meters
    Ring1 Radius 202 Feet 61.57 Meters
    Balcony0 Radius 196 Feet 59.74 Meters
    Park Area 2.77 Acres 1.12 Hectares

    For this simulation, the model dual ring village is home to 462 inhabitants,
    spread over 3 apartment levels, at a density of roughly 40 per acre.
    (For each added story, we add 154. I prefer that rings shouldn’t be higher than five stories, in the event that there are no powered elevators - for whatever reason.)

    The inherent advantage of a dual ring over a high rise is the intrinsic efficiency. Every high rise apartment building wastes volume. Hence the population density is not as favorable, per unit area. A dual ring village provides a higher population density, greater greenspace, and more pleasant environment than the typical megacity, with its sky piercing needles and expensive support infrastructure.

    Parkland density of Ring Village

    Unlike the typical highrise development, where one’s view is marred by neighboring spires, the dual ring is a visual relief.
    The almost 400 ft wide central park provides a sharp contrast with the
    standard urban landscape.

    Central Park area = 2.77 ACRES for 462 people,
    166.78 people / park acreage
    (the approx size of 2 football fields)

    In contrast:
    New York City = 38,147 acres parkland for 8,274,527 people,
    216.9 people / park acreage

    (The dual ring central circle park acreage does not include areas such as the
    rooftop garden, balcony greenery, and surfaces exterior to the ring
    village. Nor does it include any greenery planted in the Circle street.)

    It’s safe to say that no contemporary megacity can compete with a ring based megalopolis for greenspace nor volume utilization.
    The secret of life is that there is no secret of life.

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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Look at what's survived this type of catastrophic events like the pyramids which have thick walls of tonnage of stone that withstands the flooding, winds, sandstorms and I guess it this is actually cyclical, (extreme heat) As for Earthquakes in "divers" places. I wouldn't seek the core areas below sea as they will boil, and volcanic activity by eht core's heating could prove to be deadly/cook you. There is only one way, it was given to us, and whether or not we believe it, might consider trying it. Faith of all the ancestrial tales of this time in the galactic time/space continium, may be their way of showing us how to survive. IF the ancestors survived during the Sphinx's flood time, could give clues. It appears though, that everyone were either high along the river cliffs and utilizing wooden boats from gathered broken trees that made canoes, and other craft that floated at the time. Vikings on high cliff and winter rock and short springs, used water craft to survive the floods where only a b0at could gain you access. Where would they store the planes and aircraft in most airports in such an even?

    Just saying if we read how others survived, perhaps there will be enough of us. Some survived on a smaller scale with little else but bow, arrow, knife and good enclosed shelter with fire to prevent the wild animals from trying to snatch a little one or pet, or attack you in your sleep.
    Only Yah knows who will be eternal or immortal or infinite.

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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Triangular shape such as pyramid, or curved triangular like a beehive.

    Also, I'm a fan of Garbage Warrior's design. It's half-subterranean, relies on water circulation to regulate temperature, and is its own ecosystem. Processes it's own waste water through algae and bottom feeders, sends it back up to an arboretum which shades the front part of the house. Violates all zoning regulations so I don't think the full design is posted anywhere, although he explains it in a full-length documentary.

    Increasing population density seems counter-intuitive to a systemic collapse. The options would seem to be Mongolian style portable yurt villages or some type of fortification. Ring village isn't necessarily a bad concept. But it's going to depend a lot on how many people and what resources are available, and of course location. Water source must be the primary concern. Maybe we should all learn how to dowse.

    I wouldn't want to be within 300 miles of BosWash, and how to deal with millions of people suddenly turned out from an unsustainable co-dependent system, well, they're just not going to make it. Again, depends on nature of the collapse, whether death of the petrodollar, drought, flood, volcanic, warfare, or some combination. If it takes long enough, we can just make indestructible stuff by 3d printing with nano-fibers or something like that, but to start soon, I'd look at a charitable trust for the purpose of self-sustaining villagery. You could even buy weapons with it. It's how TPTB operate, so I figure borrowing their tactic for personal use might be effective.

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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Quote Posted by shaberon (here)
    [1] Triangular shape such as pyramid, or curved triangular like a beehive.

    [2] Also, I'm a fan of Garbage Warrior's design. It's half-subterranean, relies on water circulation to regulate temperature, and is its own ecosystem. Processes it's own waste water through algae and bottom feeders, sends it back up to an arboretum which shades the front part of the house. Violates all zoning regulations so I don't think the full design is posted anywhere, although he explains it in a full-length documentary.

    [3] Increasing population density seems counter-intuitive to a systemic collapse.

    [4] The options would seem to be Mongolian style portable yurt villages or some type of fortification. Ring village isn't necessarily a bad concept. But it's going to depend a lot on how many people and what resources are available, and of course location. Water source must be the primary concern. Maybe we should all learn how to dowse.

    [5] I wouldn't want to be within 300 miles of BosWash, and how to deal with millions of people suddenly turned out from an unsustainable co-dependent system, well, they're just not going to make it. Again, depends on nature of the collapse, whether death of the petrodollar, drought, flood, volcanic, warfare, or some combination.

    [6] If it takes long enough, we can just make indestructible stuff by 3d printing with nano-fibers or something like that, but to start soon, I'd look at a charitable trust for the purpose of self-sustaining villagery. You could even buy weapons with it. It's how TPTB operate, so I figure borrowing their tactic for personal use might be effective.
    [1] Interior space within a pyramid or a beehive is compromised. Also, not conducive to large, hollow structures.

    [2] A ring building, once subdivided, in intrinsically efficient. To illustrate, most sections (segments) have only 2 exposed surfaces out of six. Worst case is the top (3) or bottom (3) section. Thus heat loss / gain is reduced by 66% even before you design for the insulation. (Chinese Hakka people noted that their tulous were cool in summer and warm in winter)

    [3] The DRV is an attempt to prosper even if SHTF does not occur, hence the emphasis on population density. Though not popular in America, most of the world utilizes farming villages, where people congregate, for the benefits of mutual defense and cooperation. Having a community close by is vital when one suffers an accident or calamity. It would be tragic to slowly die, alone, in one's pristine rural getaway, because no one else is around.

    [4] Water is a vital resource. Efficiently utilizing it is key. But that is an issue in every locale. Reliance on dry composting humanure should reduce consumption.

    [5] I concur that any megalopolis is at-risk. However, most, if not all megalopoli are located at transportation hubs and ports, and may not totally collapse.
    A DRV may be obsolete as a fixed fortification in a protracted war with modern weapons, but as a means to enhance security from roving mobs and marauders, it would do quite well. A cursory examination of history shows that wealthier folks generally built walled homesteads, to reduce the risk from opportunistic predators.
    As a refuge from disaster, it has its merits. And if designed to be autonomous, a collapse of the petrodollar, breakdown in electricity, interruption in fuel delivery, or other event won't matter much. Flood? Depends on wall height. I like a minimum of four stories (40 ft) to a maximum of five stories (50 ft). If the exterior barrier wall is 2 m thick rammed earth, with a ferrocement skin, it should easily endure hydraulic pressures. Think of it as an intrinsic levee. Ditto, for mudslide. Volcanic ashfall can be a problem if the roof deck cannot handle the load. However, if the roof decks are designed for elevated farming, and a substantial soil load, ashfall would not crush the building. However, if not removed before it rains, it may clump up into a kind of cement. . . that would be a major nuisance.

    [6] I do not know of any indestructible stuff made by 3D printing, so I can't comment. As to the purchase of weaponry, that's moot. As to defensive capability, a cluster of DRVs would provide a deterrence to any predatory attack. Unlike most walled cities, where one breach spells doom, a cluster of dual ring villages would not be so vulnerable to any single breach. (Coincidentally, the proliferation of "garden walls" around Paris was a deterrent to military incursion in that area.)

    In reading about pre-industrial agriculture in Europe and Asia, there are some techniques that would be applicable to the compact DR village. In addition, there are some modern technologies like aquaponics and aeroponics that would boost food production.

    Ideally, an autonomous structure should remain comfortable and livable even if the supporting infrastructure is cut off, temporarily or worse. In temperate climates, that's a bit easier than in hot / humid climates (like S.E. America - Dixie). There are a multitude of techniques for getting warm and keeping warm (superinsulation, sunspaces, Trombe walls, solar collectors, reflectors, furnaces, etc), but there are few options to get cool and dehumidified, without mechanical means.

    One extraordinary means in a hot / dry climate was demonstrated by Forestiere and his underground gardens.
    http://www.undergroundgardens.com/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest...ground_Gardens
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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Exotic / Alternative / Experimental high yield gardening suitable for Dual Ring Villagers

    [] TERRA PRETA:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terra_preta
    Terra preta, literally "black earth" or "black land" in Portuguese, is a type of very dark, fertile anthropogenic soil found in the Amazon Basin. Terra preta owes its name to its very high charcoal content, and was made by adding a mixture of charcoal, bone, and manure to the otherwise relatively infertile Amazonian soil.
    {The key ingredient appears to be low temperature charcoal from “slash and burn” agriculture. The charcoal locks up nutrients and preserves biological fertility that normally washed away.}

    [] CHINAMPAS:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinampas
    Chinampa is a method of Mesoamerican agriculture which used small, rectangular areas of fertile arable land to grow crops on the shallow lake beds in the Valley of Mexico.
    Sometimes referred to as "floating gardens," chinampas were artificial islands that usually measured roughly 98 ft × 8.2 ft (29.9 m × 2.5 m). Chinampas were separated by channels wide enough for a canoe to pass. These "islands" had very high crop yields with up to 7 crops a year.
    {This allowed for farmers to work their fields while sitting down in their canoes. And it was easy to transport crops, with minimal effort. And the fields did not need watering, due to continuous replenishment from the canals. Added bonus was the ease at catching fish, by sealing off the canal ends with nets.}

    [] French version of chinampas.
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hortillonnages_d'Amiens
    (There is a translate page function in Google)


    A DRV located in wetlands or lowlands near a river might benefit from excavating a network of channels or canals to make chinampas.
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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Happiness in the Dual Ring Village

    Whether we know it or not, we like to make a mark and get external validation for our being here. It shows up in some as a seeker of fame and notoriety. Others seek to demonstrate how correct, right, lucky or wise they are. Most seek to acquire the symbols of status, as defined by our culture... fine house, new car, latest appliances, stylish furnishings, etc.

    In the past, during the pioneering period, people often banded together and built large projects like colleges, churches, institutions, and cities. And later, those institutions were often transformed by later visionaries.

    Tell-a-vision (nod to Swami Beyondananda)

    In harmony with the goal of prosperity - doing more with less so more can enjoy - a dual ring village is an instrument to reach that goal. Pursuing happiness is harder to do when one is miserable, at risk, suffering, and or insecure.

    Why would one be happier in a dual ring village?

    By contrasting DRVs with other forms, one can determine happiness potential.
    For example:
    • In a raging flood, would you be happier in a watertight DRV or inundated in a wood frame house?
    • In a forest fire, would you be happier in a fire resistant DRV or in a flammable log cabin?
    • In a cold spell, would you be happier in a snug DRV or in a code compliant underinsulated residence?
    • In a civil upheaval, would you be happier in a fortified, gated DRV or in a defenseless tract house?
    • In a hurricane, would you be happier in a wind resistant DRV or in an apartment that can’t withstand high winds nor flying debris?
    • In an earthquake, would you be happier in a massive curved wall DRV or in a building that can’t withstand seismic forces?
    • In a breakdown of civilization, would you be happier in an autonomous DRV or in a city, without power, water, fuel, food, and other necessities?
    Unfortunately, we're often reluctant to consider ideas that we didn't think of (not invented here syndrome) or foreign to the "common wisdom" (and subject to ridicule).

    I stipulate that a DRV is not the only solution, nor the best for all situations. But as a general solution for a community seeking to prosper over the long term, the DRV offers the most for the least cost.

    It goes without saying, that any designer of a fortified village ought to tally up all the known negative features of current urban design, and engineer solutions BEFORE creating new problems.
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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    SUBTERRANEAN LIFE

    The popular saying "out of sight, out of mind," is appropriate to modern urban design.
    You can do a search on the underground skeleton of Disneyworld, and find many references, such as :
    http://www.themeparktourist.com/feat...-magic-kingdom

    In short, Disneyworld has a public face (the park) and a private face (below).
    (Technically speaking, the utility level is at grade, because they couldn't excavate below grade in Florida. So the public access area is raised above ground level.)

    If one wishes to incorporate a subterranean environment inside a DRV, there are many benefits and options.
    Designing an underground cistern is simplified, as is waste water collection.
    Placing the logistical access "alleys" underneath, frees up more of the surface area.
    Locating industrial or manufacturing enterprises below grade minimize their impact, too.
    And placing heavy rail underground is ideal, eliminating any conflict with surface transportation. If a group of DRVs are planned, interconnecting tunnels would be an excellent feature to incorporate.

    An untested aspect is the installation of subterranean gardens and grottoes.
    Forestiere's Underground Garden exhibits up to a 20 degree reduction in ambient temperature, in hot / dry Fresno, California.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forestiere_Gardens

    In a hot / humid climate, subterranean areas will be cooler and that means condensation, leading to other problems. However, it is well known that lime wash is a remedy to prevent mold and fungus (popular around the Mediterranean coast). The soil and air in a shaded grotto will be cooler, and may allow for fruits that normally prefer a cooler climate. A central park pierced by openings to underground grottoes, where tree canopies peek through, may be quite a novelty. And when the temperature and humidity are stifling, one may find relief in the shade below the grade.
    {The ring road may also have grotto openings to the subgrade corridor, providing another option for mixed levels and 'thickened' 3-D greenspace.}

    Overall, such a DRV would have a bountiful green landscape, from the flat roof deck gardens, the balcony planters and trellises, the central park, and the subterranean gardens and grottoes.
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    Default Re: Ye Olde Fortified Village

    Whether or not this summer's "heat" erupts into a civil war, I think it would be wise for people to find like minded folks to POOL resources, cooperate, and construct FORTIFIED villages.

    The current paradigm for suburban and urban design is woefully inadequate to deal with civil disorder, let alone minor disasters.

    My preference is for a dual ring village . . .

    DUAL RING VILLAGE
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ring_life/

    A dual ring village is, in essence two circular fortresses, one within the other. These circular buildings offer many engineering benefits - increased strength, economy, reduced material, and resistance to side forces. They are inherently disaster resistant to earthquakes, fire, flood, mudslide, wind, flying debris, vermin, predators, and small arms fire. If sufficiently thick, the exterior walls may even block gamma radiation from nuclear fall out (3 ft is the safe minimum). Ditto, for the roof deck.

    The dual ring creates a circular main street, between the two rings, and the central area can be whatever the Ringers want - a park, a pasture, a nature preserve, country club, a saucer landing zone and so on. This juxtaposition of an urban environment of mixed use enterprise and dwellings, next to a substantial park is ideal. No matter where one lives, one is but a short distance from one’s vocation, shopping, entertainment, recreation and nature. In addition, the DRV can utilize its rooftop as a garden, safe from pesky intruders at ground level.

    The spacing between rings can be narrow - only one lane wide or expansive enough for a parade to march through or a procession to pass. The choice is up to the Ringers, themselves, to determine what kind of main street environment that they want. Ditto, for the overall size.

    As to livability, it compares well with the many suggestions stated in "A Pattern Language".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Pattern_Language

    A hexagonal array of DRVs could make up a futuristic mega city which despite high density population, would be eminently livable, with more parkland per occupant, and phenomenal greenspace than any other city on earth. The network of curved roads impose a natural speed limit that eliminates the need for speed bumps and twisty roadways. Roundabout intersections eliminate stoplights and stop-and-go traffic. No need for superhighways, as the whole road system is a fault tolerant mesh with a high average velocity.

    http://www.state.nj.us/transportatio...EqualTo50.shtm
    Examples:
    • For an outer ring road of 150 ft radius, the safe speed is 19 mph.
    • For an outer ring road of 300 ft radius, the safe speed is 27 mph.
    • For an outer ring road of 600 ft radius, the safe speed is 37 mph.
    • For an outer ring road of 900 ft radius, the safe speed is 44 mph.
    • For an outer ring road of 1200 ft radius, the safe speed is 50 mph.

    By design, a city of dual ring villages and unidirectional ring roads would have inherent speed limitations - especially if roundabouts / traffic circles form the intersections between rings. The urban road system would be a mesh, with no need for stoplights, a moderate average velocity, and fault tolerant in the event of a blockage

    What characteristics would attract someone to live in a high density population environment, like a dual ring village, surrounded by countryside?
    [] Family oriented, child safe, pleasant neighborhood
    [] Luxury hotel - room service - excellent accommodations - luxuries
    [] Country club - sports - relaxation - socializing - swimming pool - bar - restaurant
    [] Retirement - quiet - restful - low stress - proximity to health care
    [] Shopping Mall - varied retail outlets - cooperatives - distribution centers
    [] Amusement or Theme Park - games, rides, zoo, play, costumes, role playing,
    [] Entertainment - music, theater, movies, dance, production sets
    [] Educational - museums, libraries, observatory, laboratories, lecture halls
    [] Esthetics - art, sculpture, illumination, fashion, behavior, gracious customs
    [] Personal grooming - hair care - nails - skin care - tailor shop - laundry -
    [] Health care - dental - clinic - hospice
    [] Professional / skilled labor - engineering, construction, repair
    [] SCA - fairgrounds - pavilions - gazebo - Shakespearean Globe theater
    [] Underground / out of sight infrastructure (freight, utilities, waste, engineering) ex: back alley, etc.
    [] Your ideas here _______

    What characteristics would you wish to avoid or prevent?
    [] Typical complaints: __ noise __ smell __ visual __ ??
    [] Vandalism (destruction)
    [] Predation (crime, etc)
    [] Waste (inefficiency, refuse, garbage)
    [] Misery (suffering, loneliness, helplessness, hopelessness)
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