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Thread: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

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    Avalon Member Satori's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    I'm an "Isist." Universe is. Infinite intelligence is. Your G-d is.

    A thing (all things: corporeal or incorporeal) we perceive "is" as it is because if it weren't as it "is", then it could either not be perceived (because perhaps it does not exist) or be something other than what we perceive. (This is an example of the "anthropic principle.")

    I am being human. You are being human (I assume). Non-human life forms are "being" something else.

    Being human, we have control over only one thing. (Though few of us, including me, exercise plenary control of this one thing.) That one thing "is" our own thoughts (and thus our own actions or inactions). In my view, having control over only one thing must mean that we have control over the most important thing--our thoughts. Thoughts are ("is") truly things. How we beings use or misuse thought is up to each individual--which translates to the collective. The outcomes are good, bad, or indifferent. It is what it is and what it has been and will be.

    We who are being human do not have any control of what other beings think and, thus, we have no control over what other beings do or do not do.

    Get used to it. Let it be. "Is" is where it is.

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    UK Avalon Member Nick Matkin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    But what were the maps of earth showing towards the end of the video in #40?

    And the precipitous graph - what was the vertical scale showing the decline of since 1850? Presumably the earth's magnetic field, but in what units? And was it a linear or logarithmic sale? (Those with some technical background will appreciate why that is relevant.) How accurate were the first measurements over 200 years ago?

    An interesting collection of ideas, but too little relevant technical content - and none of it was placed in any kind of context.

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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    Quote Posted by Nick Matkin (here)
    But what were the maps of earth showing towards the end of the video in #40?

    And the precipitous graph - what was the vertical scale showing the decline of since 1850? Presumably the earth's magnetic field, but in what units? And was it a linear or logarithmic sale? (Those with some technical background will appreciate why that is relevant.) How accurate were the first measurements over 200 years ago?

    An interesting collection of ideas, but too little relevant technical content - and none of it was placed in any kind of context.
    http://www.suspicious0bservers.org/w...NewPaper-4.pdf

    Here is the first (I think) publication. Perhaps will help you. They have Been accurate in many predictions of quake activity. I was impressed enough to hop on a plane and attend their lectures in Jan. in Phoenix if that tells you something.

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    Avalon Member MorningSong's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    Here's something I just happen to run up on today regarding the Earth's magnetic field, supposedly from May 4, 2016:

    Quote Earth’s Magnetic Shield is weakening – Spokane Tech Time

    New study shows that Earth’s magnetic field won’t flip anytime soon. On the contrary, it seems that the weakening intensity that has been observed by scientists in the last few centuries is its way to recover after an unusual high.

    The study published in the National Academy of Science’s Proceedings claims that the current intensity of our magnetic field has been 40 percent higher in the last few hundred years than it was in the past five million years

    The reason: Earth’s magnetic field is becoming gradually weaker, and this affects how the solar wind — charged particles from the sun — bounces off it.

    In time, the aurora could reach as far as the southern United States.

    “The Earth’s magnetic field more or less keeps the solar wind at bay, and it’s the solar wind interacting with the field that contributes to the auroras,” said Dennis Kent, an expert in paleomagnetism at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

    “With a strong field, that interaction is pushed to high latitudes. With a weaker field more of the Earth is bathed in these charged particles.

    With a weakened geomagnetic field, increased solar radiation might damage electronics—from individual pacemakers to entire power grids—and could induce genetic mutations. A reversal may also affect the navigation of animals that use Earth’s magnetic field as an internal compass.

    But according to a new Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the geomagnetic field is not in danger of flipping anytime soon: The researchers calculated Earth’s average, stable field intensity over the last 5 million years, and found that today’s intensity is about twice that of the historical average.

    This indicates that the current field intensity has a long way to fall before reaching an unstable level that would lead to a reversal.

    “It makes a huge difference, knowing if today’s field is a long-term average or is way above the long-term average,” says lead author Huapei Wang, a postdoc in MIT’s Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences. “Now we know we are way above the unstable zone. Even if the [field intensity] is dropping, we still have a long buffer that we can comfortably rely on.”

    “So a consequence would be that the aurora would be visible at lower latitudes.” The same is expected with the southern lights.

    Kent does not count on living long enough to see the changes, “but I expect my grandson will. He’s six.”

    And even today’s adults may see some progression, such as brighter or more common displays of the aurora in places like Ottawa, where it is already visible from time to time.

    Kent is a co-author of a paper just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a major research journal.

    The paper looks at how Earth’s magnetic field is weakening, and suggests it has been abnormally high but is now retreating toward the long-term average. The field has weakened by about 10 per cent in the past two centuries.

    But there’s a more important reason to study this, beyond knowing when the sky will be pretty. The magnetic field occasionally “flips” and reverses our planet’s north and south poles.

    It has done this hundreds of times in the past 100 million years, most recently about 780,000 years ago. During the current weakening, some scientists have been expecting it to become unstable and flip again.That’s unlikely for now, Kent’s team says. They estimate that the current field, despite weakening, is still stronger than the long-term average, leaving plenty of room for change without becoming unstable.

    They have been able to determine that the intensity of the magnetic field had been weaker during the past 5 million years than it is today but also that its poles inverted several times.Researchers argue that even if the intensity of Earth’s magnetic field is decreasing, it hasn’t even reached its long-term historical value yet. So there is nothing to worry about or at least not during our lifetime.

    However, in the last 100 million years, the magnetic poles have reversed for hundreds of times. It is believed that the most recent reversal happened 780,000 years ago.Some scientists are wondering if the past switches of the magnetic poles had anything to do with the extinction of some species.

    A flip of the magnetic field in the near future could have a negative impact on our technology, being able to take down our electrical grid.

    Earth scientists can chart past changes by looking at volcanic rock. As lava cools, iron-bearing minerals in it solidify and act like tiny magnets, aligning with the Earth’s magnetic field. By knowing the age of the rock, a scientist can determine which way the magnetic field was oriented and how strong it was when the rock formed, and how strong the magnetic field was.
    Far from zero

    So why have scientists assumed that Earth’s geomagnetic field is dropping to a precipitous low? It turns out this assumption is based on flawed historical data, Wang says.

    Scientists have estimated paleomagnetic intensities at various latitudes around the Earth, but Wang’s is the first data from equatorial regions. However, Wang found that scientists were misinterpreting how rocks recorded their magnetic fields, leading to inaccurate estimates of paleomagnetic intensity. Specifically, scientists were assuming that as individual ferromagnetic grains of rocks cooled, their unpaired electron spins assumed a uniform orientation, reflecting the magnetic field intensity.

    However, this effect only holds true up to a certain size. In larger grains, unpaired electron spins assume various orientations in different domains of the grain, thereby complicating the field intensity picture.

    Wang developed a method to correct for such multidomain effects, and applied the method to his Galapagos lavas. The results, he says, are more reliable than previous estimates of the paleomagnetic field.
    http://www.albanydailystar.com/scien...ime-11769.html

    So now, my question is "How much does the Earth's magnetic field have to weaken to no longer support the world's electricity grids?"

    And since "magnetic field" seems to be the word for the day, here's what's on spaceweather today:

    Quote EARTH'S MAGNETIC FIELD IS CHANGING: Anyone watching a compass needle point steadily north might suppose that Earth's magnetic field is a constant. It's not. Researchers have long known that changes are afoot. The north magnetic pole routinely moves, as much as 40 km/yr, causing compass needles to drift over time. Moreover, the global magnetic field has weakened 10% since the 19th century.

    A new study by the European Space Agency's constellation of Swarm satellites reveals that changes may be happening even faster than previously thought. In this map, blue depicts where Earth's magnetic field is weak and red shows regions where it is strong:



    Data from Swarm, combined with observations from the CHAMP and Ørsted satellites, show clearly that the field has weakened by about 3.5% at high latitudes over North America, while it has strengthened about 2% over Asia. The region where the field is at its weakest – the South Atlantic Anomaly – has moved steadily westward and weakened further by about 2%. These changes have occured over the relatively brief period between 1999 and mid-2016.

    Earth's magnetic field protects us from solar storms and cosmic rays. Less magnetism means more radiation can penetrate our planet's atmosphere. Indeed, high altitude balloons launched by Spaceweather.com routinely detect increasing levels of cosmic rays over California. Perhaps the ebbing magnetic field over North America contributes to that trend.

    As remarkable as these changes sound, they're mild compared to what Earth's magnetic field has done in the past. Sometimes the field completely flips, with north and the south poles swapping places. Such reversals, recorded in the magnetism of ancient rocks, are unpredictable. They come at irregular intervals averaging about 300,000 years; the last one was 780,000 years ago. Are we overdue for another? No one knows.

    Swarm is a trio of satellites equipped with vector magnetometers capable of sensing Earth's magnetic field all the way from orbital altitudes down to the edge of our planet's core. The constellation is expected to continue operations at least until 2017, and possibly beyond, so stay tuned for updates.
    Here's the link referred to in the above snippet:

    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Ob...etic_heartbeat
    "Vision without action is merely a dream.
    Action without vision just passes the time.
    Vision with action can change the world." Joel Arthur Barker

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    UK Avalon Member Nick Matkin's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    Thanks for those MorningSong. The first one seems particularly detailed and will upset the polar-flip fear-porn merchants I fear! But they'll find woo-woo stuff to keep them going no doubt.

    As to your question "How much does the Earth's magnetic field have to weaken to no longer support the world's electricity grids?", well as the article you posted states, it's not really declining very rapidly. But I guess you mean if it continues to weaken, and space weather has more and more influence on the earth's magnetic field, will the buffeting be more likely to upset the electricity distribution grid?

    Well I'm sure we could have a grid without the earth's magnetic field (providing we were still here!) since the its generation relies on man's ability to generate it. Maybe a weaker field would have less negative influence on the grid during bad space weather.
    Last edited by Nick Matkin; 12th May 2016 at 16:14. Reason: spelling

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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    We also use ice cores and 10Be for analyzing cosmic rays in the past and 14C and tree rings for checking into past solar activity.

    http://m.pnas.org/content/109/16/5967.full

    As an accomplished scientist I tend to ignore mainstream science, mainstream media, mainstream alternative media and the mainstream average joe. They rarely provide answers. They are not world changers and those who are, are not mainstream. True Ben Davidson does get melodramatic at times but here in the US we have drama teachers.....drama teachers.... Need I say more.

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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week


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    Default Re: The Earth's Magnetic Field Did Not Collapse This Week

    Quote Posted by Hervé (here)
    ... enters the "Electric Universe"!
    The following doesn't really fit on this thread very well, but didn't seem worth its own thread.

    It does touch on both "weather" and on the "Electric Universe" however, so might be of interest to those who might notice this thread.

    In the following video, from EU2017 (Electric Universe 2017), Gerald Pollack explains several weather phenomenon, such as clouds (why do they float, not fall?), evaporation, rain, storms, fronts, etc using ideas familiar to those following the Electric Universe work and Pollack's EZ (fourth-phase) water research.



    It provides a quite enjoyable hour's listen, if you'd like an explanation of the weather that makes a lot more sense, to me at least, than what I was taught in school.
    Last edited by Paul; 15th August 2018 at 23:32.

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