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Thread: Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

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    Aaland Avalon Member Agape's Avatar
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    Default Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

    http://www.csiro.au/en/Research/BF/A...ontrol-of-carp

    Reducing Australia’s carp invasion

    CSIRO scientists are undertaking rigorous tests to determine the safety and suitability of the candidate biocontrol agent Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) in managing European carp numbers in Australia.

    THE CHALLENGE
    European carp – an invasive species of Australian waterways



    European carp (Cyprinus carpio) is a pest that adversely affects the health of our rivers and wetlands. It was first introduced to Australian waterways more than 100 years ago and has since established in every state except the Northern Territory. Able to tolerate a wide range of conditions and habitats, including low-oxygen and brackish water, it is considered one of the country’s major aquatic pests since it massively spread through the Murray-Darling Basin in the late 1980s. Previously held in check by the drought, recent years of flooding rains have brought our river systems back to life, and as a result the carp population has again expanded. This puts increasing pressure on our waterways and native wildlife.


    Cute , the 'pest' sells for $5 for kilogram all around the year and more before Xmas . Well , probably even more in your local supermarket .


    Now watch ...


    Curbing carp numbers
    A recently identified candidate biological control agent may one day keep carp numbers in check. Our scientists are currently investigating a highly specific viral disease called cyprinid herpesvirus-3, also known as koi herpesvirus (KHV), to help manage carp numbers in Australia. The virus first appeared in Israel in 1998, and spread rapidly throughout much of the world, although not to Australia or New Zealand. It causes high death rates in common carp and in the ornamental koi carp. No other species of fish, including goldfish, are known to be affected by the virus.

    We are undertaking our research within the world’s most sophisticated high containment facility - the CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory, where we are performing rigorous tests to determine the safety and suitability of the virus for controlling carp.
    THE RESULTS
    Carp herpesvirus could stem the tide
    We have identified that CyHV-3 does kill Australian pest carps, and it kills them quickly. Current research has also shown that the virus does not develop in native Australian or any other introduced species of fish.

    Over the next few years we’ll continue to test the susceptibility of other fish and amphibian species to CyHV-3 and address questions regarding the safety of possible widespread distribution of the virus, both for people and other animal species. This work is supported by the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre and the release program is led by the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries.

    We will also continue to consult widely with conservation groups, recreational fishers and resource managers.


    https://www.rt.com/news/341556-austr...-herpes-virus/


    Australia to spend over $11mn to eradicate carps by releasing herpes virus into rivers


    Australia will spend more than US$11 million in a bid to exterminate European carp by releasing a virulent strain of herpes into the country’s largest waterway.
    As much as 15 million Australian dollars will be spent on funding the clearing of the Murray-Darling Basin from the country’s worst freshwater feral pest. This will be included into Tuesday’s federal budget, Australian authorities said on Sunday.

    Interestingly enough, the war on fish is to be waged by an unusual means – the water will be contaminated with a special type of herpes, known as koi herpes.

    Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) scientists have been carrying out various tests for nearly a decade on other animals including chickens, mice, frogs, turtles and water dragons “to determine the safety and suitability” of the virus in dealing with an excessive carp population.

    The virus was proven to be harmless to humans and animals, but it causes kidney failure in carps, attacks their skin and kills the fish after sitting tight in its system for about seven days.

    “It causes high death rates in common carp and in the ornamental koi carp. No other species of fish, including goldfish, are known to be affected by the virus,” CSIRO official website says.

    “It affects the European carp by attacking their kidneys, their skin, their gills and stopping them breathing effectively,” Australian Science Minister Christopher Pyne said, according to ABC news.

    “They have the virus for a week before they show any symptoms and it suddenly kills them within 24 hours,” he added.

    It’s been calculated that the carp-control program planned to be launched in 2018 will kill 95 percent of the targeted fish over the next 30 years.

    The project can’t be brought to life right away since it is still to be determined how to deal with dead bodies most effectively. A significant part of the budgeting is to be spent specifically on a clean-up program.

    “There’s obvious talk about whether the carp could be used for fertilizer, whether they could be used for pet food, whether they'll need to be buried in large graves and be allowed to dissipate back into the system,” Pyne noted.

    Carps, that were described as the “rabbits of waterways” by Australia’s Agriculture and Water Resources Minister Barnaby Joyce for how quickly they breed and spread, have brought other populations of fish in the Murray River to the verge of extinction. Apart from that, every year Australia loses up to 500 million Australian dollars (more than US$ 380 million) due to the uncontrolled population of carps, he also said.



    So theoretically and if the projects 'objective' succeed you'll be left with millions of dead and disintegrating fish on the bottom supporting flourishing microbial growth .
    Viruses are known for their short lives in general enabling them easy adaptation and mutation in few generations .

    It's fairly disgusting if you think that nature can not take care of few million carps but you can by turning your waters to damps .

    What about sharks . I'd suggest few sharks can do the job better than tons of herpes virus.






    Last edited by Agape; 2nd May 2016 at 09:58.

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    Scotland Avalon Member Ewan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

    You'd think the myxomatosis debacle would have taught them something.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbits_in_Australia

    Are any specific fish species being listed as adversely effected by the carp numbers, such as population decline figures?

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    Aaland Avalon Member Agape's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

    Quote Posted by Ewan (here)

    Are any specific fish species being listed as adversely effected by the carp numbers, such as population decline figures?
    According to CSIPRO :

    "Because of the way carp feed, where they feed on either plant life or small invertebrates in the mud at the bottom of the river, they suck in an amount of material from the river bed and spit it out, sifting out the food that they want," Dr Ken McColl, CSIRO Head Researcher at the Australian Animal Health Laboratories Carp Control Team, explains to Gizmag.

    "So this process means that the water becomes very, very muddy and unclear, and that then stops plant life from growing because they can't get enough light," continues McColl. "It also upsets some of the invertebrate life, it upsets the breeding of some of the native fish species and because all of these things happen, it actually has impacts further up the line. So you stop getting a lot of bird life coming to the waters like ducks that feed on the plants, for example."

    It is with a healthy hint of irony that the panacea to Australia's carp problem may come via a virus that has caused monumental damage in other parts of the world. While carp is an unwanted pest in Australia, it is actually an important source of protein in much of Asia, Eastern Europe and parts of the Middle East. So when the Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) appeared in Israel in 1998 and swept across carp farms killing off large portions of livestock, it spelled bad news for many. But in countries where carp pose a problem, there was perhaps a silver lining.

    http://www.gizmag.com/carp-herpes-ri...stralia/43088/

    No specific or endangered species of fish are listed . The carps are merely reducing biodiversity of the river and thus ..the whole environment .
    It's why they're called the common carp ( Cyprinus carpio ), being 'quite' widespread 'quite yet' in European ponds and rivers and known not to cause much harm .
    Here in Europe they end up in mass fishing nets once or twice a year and thus, the problem is solved .

    Releasing herpes virus to counteract 'carp problem' is extremely bad idea, in my opinion because any subsequent mutation of the virus will cause much more problem than the carps and unlike fish the virus is far more difficult to control.



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    Australia Avalon Member bluestflame's Avatar
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    Default Re: Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

    due to the extreme "farktardedness" of the whole proposal , i find myself left with very little other option but to believe this is just another trojan horse agenda , i mean hey lets put herpies into the water supply , sounds like a good plan not like anyone swims in it , waterskis in it drinks it ....

    nrecently they made a heap of CSIRO scientists jobs redundant , perhaps they have weeded out the ones that were unwilling to become " yes men "
    Last edited by bluestflame; 2nd May 2016 at 15:14.

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    Default Re: Carps run .. Australian immigration laws just got tougher

    Mmmm yummy, shingles for everyone.

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