+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1 7
Results 121 to 134 of 134

Thread: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

  1. Link to Post #121
    India Avalon Member kanishk's Avatar
    Join Date
    24th September 2011
    Location
    Nagpur, India.
    Age
    30
    Posts
    452
    Thanks
    8,305
    Thanked 2,061 times in 403 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quote Posted by TargeT (here)
    Why not just copy their products? they are using 810nm wavelength IR and a 10 or 40 hz pulse rate, they also said to keep the watts below 10 "for safety".
    They have not mentioned the wattage of the laser. What they have mentioned is the concentration of laser light at a certain distance after it passes through a lens. Now determining the focal distance of that lens can done by knowing the output power of that laser beam which can be determined by knowing the wattage of the laser that been used. There are two types of laser available in market one which produces coherent light and one that are pulsed. The one used in this device is a coherent light and the pulse is created by electronics in the device.

    While replicating the device if you use the pulsed laser it will not work. And I think the pulse used in this device is Square wave pulse. But we don't have the data regarding the width and length of that wave. It can be measured in home too in computer using its MIC input and some software. But I think whatever the shape of the wave the PULE OF 10 HZ is most important. If it is pulsating at 10 HZ it will work at SINE WAVE or SQURE WAVE too, as I assumed from reading their research papers, not sure.

  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to kanishk For This Post:

    BMJ (20th April 2017), Ernie Nemeth (26th April 2017), Ewan (21st April 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (18th April 2017), sheme (27th April 2017), TargeT (18th April 2017)

  3. Link to Post #122
    Virgin Islands Avalon Member TargeT's Avatar
    Join Date
    30th June 2011
    Location
    St. Croix
    Age
    37
    Posts
    6,390
    Thanks
    17,771
    Thanked 30,577 times in 5,923 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quote Posted by kanishk (here)
    While replicating the device if you use the pulsed laser it will not work.
    That's why I suggested LED, I have no experiencing working with any level of laser (except for burning spiders with my roommates laser.. haha he had a 40 watt device iirc)

    Quote Posted by kanishk (here)
    And I think the pulse used in this device is Square wave pulse. But we don't have the data regarding the width and length of that wave. It can be measured in home too in computer using its MIC input and some software. But I think whatever the shape of the wave the PULE OF 10 HZ is most important. If it is pulsating at 10 HZ it will work at SINE WAVE or SQURE WAVE too, as I assumed from reading their research papers, not sure.
    we are working with DC components, it'd be square wave most likely; but I also think that is irrelevant to LED use.
    There was a 1: 400,000,000,000,000 chance of you being born: what have you done with your miraculous life today?

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to TargeT For This Post:

    BMJ (20th April 2017), kanishk (19th April 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (18th April 2017)

  5. Link to Post #123
    United States Avalon Member Sam Hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    15th December 2011
    Location
    In reconciliation
    Age
    59
    Posts
    4,470
    Thanks
    25,431
    Thanked 21,952 times in 4,143 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quite relevant to this thread...

    http://www.brainsync.com/blog/using-...eid=a6532dc4aa

    Using Gamma Waves to Treat Alzheimer’s Disease


    Could brainwave stimulation prevent or even reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s disease? Using visual stimulation from flickering lights, researchers at MIT have discovered that gamma wave oscillations can greatly reduce the beta amyloid plaque build up of alzheimer’s in mice. A single hour of stimulation was found to reduce plaque build up by more than 50 percent. “…if humans behave similarly to mice in response to this treatment, I would say the potential is just enormous, because it’s so noninvasive, and it’s so accessible.” says Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory.

    Gamma Wave Therapy from Brainsync

    From MIT

    Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
    December 7, 2016

    Using LED lights flickering at a specific frequency, MIT researchers have shown that they can substantially reduce the beta amyloid plaques seen in Alzheimer’s disease, in the visual cortex of mice.

    This treatment appears to work by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, which the researchers discovered help the brain suppress beta amyloid production and invigorate cells responsible for destroying the plaques.

    Further research will be needed to determine if a similar approach could help Alzheimer’s patients, says Li-Huei Tsai, the Picower Professor of Neuroscience, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, and senior author of the study, which appears in the Dec. 7 online edition of Nature.

    “It’s a big ‘if,’ because so many things have been shown to work in mice, only to fail in humans,” Tsai says. “But if humans behave similarly to mice in response to this treatment, I would say the potential is just enormous, because it’s so noninvasive, and it’s so accessible.”

    Tsai and Ed Boyden, an associate professor of biological engineering and brain and cognitive sciences at the MIT Media Lab and the McGovern Institute for Brain Research, who is also an author of the Nature paper, have started a company called Cognito Therapeutics to pursue tests in humans. The paper’s lead authors are graduate student Hannah Iaccarino and Media Lab research affiliate Annabelle Singer.

    “This important announcement may herald a breakthrough in the understanding and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, a terrible affliction affecting millions of people and their families around the world,” says Michael Sipser, dean of MIT’s School of Science. “Our MIT scientists have opened the door to an entirely new direction of research on this brain disorder and the mechanisms that may cause or prevent it. I find it extremely exciting.”

    Brain wave stimulation

    Alzheimer’s disease, which affects more than 5 million people in the United States, is characterized by beta amyloid plaques that are suspected to be harmful to brain cells and to interfere with normal brain function. Previous studies have hinted that Alzheimer’s patients also have impaired gamma oscillations. These brain waves, which range from 25 to 80 hertz (cycles per second), are believed to contribute to normal brain functions such as attention, perception, and memory.

    In a study of mice that were genetically programmed to develop Alzheimer’s but did not yet show any plaque accumulation or behavioral symptoms, Tsai and her colleagues found impaired gamma oscillations during patterns of activity that are essential for learning and memory while running a maze.

    Next, the researchers stimulated gamma oscillations at 40 hertz in a brain region called the hippocampus, which is critical in memory formation and retrieval. These initial studies relied on a technique known as optogenetics, co-pioneered by Boyden, which allows scientists to control the activity of genetically modified neurons by shining light on them. Using this approach, the researchers stimulated certain brain cells known as interneurons, which then synchronize the gamma activity of excitatory neurons.

    After an hour of stimulation at 40 hertz, the researchers found a 40 to 50 percent reduction in the levels of beta amyloid proteins in the hippocampus. Stimulation at other frequencies, ranging from 20 to 80 hertz, did not produce this decline.

    Tsai and colleagues then began to wonder if less-invasive techniques might achieve the same effect. Tsai and Emery Brown, the Edward Hood Taplin Professor of Medical Engineering and Computational Neuroscience, a member of the Picower Institute, and an author of the paper, came up with the idea of using an external stimulus — in this case, light — to drive gamma oscillations in the brain. The researchers built a simple device consisting of a strip of LEDs that can be programmed to flicker at different frequencies.

    Using this device, the researchers found that an hour of exposure to light flickering at 40 hertz enhanced gamma oscillations and reduced beta amyloid levels by half in the visual cortex of mice in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s. However, the proteins returned to their original levels within 24 hours.

    The researchers then investigated whether a longer course of treatment could reduce amyloid plaques in mice with more advanced accumulation of amyloid plaques. After treating the mice for an hour a day for seven days, both plaques and free-floating amyloid were markedly reduced. The researchers are now trying to determine how long these effects last.

    Furthermore, the researchers found that gamma rhythms also reduced another hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease: the abnormally modified Tau protein, which can form tangles in the brain.

    “What this study does, in a very carefully designed and well-executed way, is show that gamma oscillations, which we have known for a long time are linked to cognitive function, play a critical role in the capacity of the brain to clean up deposits,” says Alvaro Pascual-Leone, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School who was not involved in the research. “That’s remarkable and surprising, and it opens up the exciting prospect of possible translation to application in humans.”

    Tsai’s lab is now studying whether light can drive gamma oscillations in brain regions beyond the visual cortex, and preliminary data suggest that this is possible. They are also investigating whether the reduction in amyloid plaques has any effects on the behavioral symptoms of their Alzheimer’s mouse models, and whether this technique could affect other neurological disorders that involve impaired gamma oscillations.

    Two modes of action

    The researchers also performed studies to try to figure out how gamma oscillations exert their effects. They found that after gamma stimulation, the process for beta amyloid generation is less active. Gamma oscillations also improved the brain’s ability to clear out beta amyloid proteins, which is normally the job of immune cells known as microglia.

    “They take up toxic materials and cell debris, clean up the environment, and keep neurons healthy,” Tsai says.

    In Alzheimer’s patients, microglia cells become very inflammatory and secrete toxic chemicals that make other brain cells more sick. However, when gamma oscillations were boosted in mice, their microglia underwent morphological changes and became more active in clearing away the beta amyloid proteins.

    “The bottom line is, enhancing gamma oscillations in the brain can do at least two things to reduced amyloid load. One is to reduce beta amyloid production from neurons. And second is to enhance the clearance of amyloids by microglia,” Tsai says.

    The researchers also sequenced messenger RNA from the brains of the treated mice and found that hundreds of genes were over- or underexpressed, and they are now investigating the possible impact of those variations on Alzheimer’s disease.

    The research was funded by the JPB Foundation, the Cameron Hayden Lord Foundation, a Barbara J. Weedon Fellowship, the New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Award, the National Institutes of Health, the Belfer Neurodegeneration Consortium, and the Halis Family Foundation.
    All the above is all and only my opinion - all subject to change and not meant to be true for anyone else regardless of how I phrase it.

  6. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Sam Hunter For This Post:

    avid (19th April 2017), Bill Ryan (18th April 2017), BMJ (20th April 2017), Ernie Nemeth (26th April 2017), Ewan (21st April 2017), fourty-two (27th April 2017), Heart2hearth (18th April 2017), ks4ever (22nd April 2017), Reinhard (19th April 2017), TargeT (18th April 2017)

  7. Link to Post #124
    South Africa Avalon Member JohanB's Avatar
    Join Date
    19th March 2017
    Posts
    61
    Thanks
    99
    Thanked 351 times in 60 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    I also bought the "655 Prime" and has been using it for two weeks twice a day - metcioulously. Not sure if there has been any positive effect. One "big negative", my wife and kids, laughting and making fun at me whenever i "tickle my brain" with the Prime, ha ha

    A previous poster adviced using Vit B12 supplement and that triggered me to investigate a bit further and i saw this persons advice:

    http://www.news24.com/MyNews24/Do-yo...iency-20130224


    "Please not that I am not a doctor or medical expert , I did however suffer permanent brain damage due to a deficiency of B12 that was not picked up by my doctor or pharmacist (not to mention a serious loss in quality of life) and would like to bring this information to the attention of the general public before some of them suffer the same fate as I did.
    Do you suffer from some of the next symptoms ?
    Chronic fatigue,off balance, memory impairment, irritability, depression , light-headedness , foggy feeling in the mind ( Ignore this symptom for three months and you will have it for life), rapid heartbeat and breathing , short of breath , sore tongue, bleeding gums, often going from diarrhea to constipation ? (many other symptoms are also indicative , please look it up."

    Needless to say, my symptoms are almost exact as descibed above....and i cannot wait to see the combined effect of the 655 Prime treatment and some B12 regular dosage

    Take care
    J
    Life is good, almost always !

  8. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to JohanB For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (19th April 2017), BMJ (20th April 2017), Ewan (21st April 2017), fourty-two (19th April 2017), Heart2hearth (18th April 2017), kanishk (19th April 2017), Sam Hunter (19th April 2017), sheme (27th April 2017), TargeT (25th April 2017)

  9. Link to Post #125
    Germany Avalon Member
    Join Date
    18th July 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Age
    55
    Posts
    201
    Thanks
    624
    Thanked 1,421 times in 193 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quote "Please not that I am not a doctor or medical expert , I did however suffer permanent brain damage due to a deficiency of B12 that was not picked up by my doctor or pharmacist ...
    Until now all of my patients that had chronic diseases also had strong deficits of vitamin B12. The best methods to detect B12 deficiency are: measuring amount of methylmalon acid in urine or make a multi element analyses in urine or hair. In the latter case B12 deficiency shows up as a deficiencty of Kobalt.

    These patients needed a daily dosis of 5000 µg methylcobalamine for about 2...8 (!) months to normalize methylmalon acid in urin.

    Just lay it under the tongue, but do not swallow it, because it is destroyed in the stomach. B12 as Methylcobalamine can be absorbed directly into the blood stream via mucosa.
    Last edited by Olaf; 20th April 2017 at 13:01.

  10. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to Olaf For This Post:

    avid (19th April 2017), Bill Ryan (19th April 2017), BMJ (20th April 2017), Dennis Leahy (19th April 2017), Ernie Nemeth (26th April 2017), Ewan (21st April 2017), fourty-two (27th April 2017), Heart2hearth (19th April 2017), JohanB (19th April 2017), kanishk (20th April 2017), meat suit (19th April 2017), Ol' Roy (6th May 2017), penn (26th April 2017), Sam Hunter (19th April 2017), sheme (11th May 2017), Swan (19th April 2017), TargeT (25th April 2017)

  11. Link to Post #126
    United States Avalon Greeter: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Lovingston, VA
    Age
    74
    Posts
    1,562
    Thanks
    10,526
    Thanked 12,139 times in 1,503 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Today, my friend Helen says she continues to see more significant change since starting Vielight 655 Prime treatments.
    When Helen sends remote healing treatments the energy feels more intense and she can see more clearly the person receiving the healing energy.
    Helen's dreams continue to become more vivid.

    Helen just called to add:
    She experienced "tremendous heat and tremendous pressure on my 3rd eye for about 2 minutes after using the Vielight 655 Prime".

    My experience has not been one of significant change, so far. The mild headaches still come and go.

    It appears as if the experience of using the Vielight can be very different among individuals.
    Last edited by Ron Mauer Sr; 19th April 2017 at 20:00.

  12. The Following 15 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (19th April 2017), BMJ (20th April 2017), celticwarrior (19th April 2017), drneglector (5th May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (26th April 2017), Ewan (21st April 2017), fourty-two (27th April 2017), Heart2hearth (19th April 2017), kanishk (20th April 2017), ks4ever (22nd April 2017), Ol' Roy (6th May 2017), Olaf (20th April 2017), Sam Hunter (19th April 2017), sanma (19th April 2017), sheme (27th April 2017)

  13. Link to Post #127
    United States Avalon Member Generous's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th April 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Age
    40
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    34
    Thanked 90 times in 20 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    How about 20-30 of us pitch in and get one, have our way with it lol and pass it on to the next Avalonian.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Generous For This Post:

    TargeT (25th April 2017)

  15. Link to Post #128
    United States Avalon Greeter: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Lovingston, VA
    Age
    74
    Posts
    1,562
    Thanks
    10,526
    Thanked 12,139 times in 1,503 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Day 29 with the Vielight 655 Prime.
    Just noticed, I think I have become a little more loving. Due to the Vielight? Maybe.
    Also just remembered, someone else made a supporting comment about a week ago.
    No other changes noticed (yet).

  16. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    BMJ (26th April 2017), celticwarrior (27th April 2017), Ernie Nemeth (26th April 2017), fourty-two (27th April 2017), Heart2hearth (25th April 2017), Sam Hunter (11th May 2017), Selene (27th April 2017), sheme (27th April 2017), TargeT (25th April 2017)

  17. Link to Post #129
    Virgin Islands Avalon Member Selene's Avatar
    Join Date
    11th January 2011
    Location
    Music Of The Spheres
    Posts
    1,164
    Thanks
    9,878
    Thanked 8,169 times in 1,108 posts

    Default Re: My experience with the Vielight

    Here’s my 30-Day Report on using my Vielight 810 (the LED, 810 Nm, 10 Hz model):

    I have some background in using infrared and near-infrared light for skincare and physiotherapy, so before ordering the 810, I experimented with my trusty BabyQuasar, which has about a dozen small LED’s in a small unit, and simply aimed the light up my nostrils from the base of my nose.

    [confusing Baby Quasar upload link removed by Selene]

    The immediate effect after one ten-minute treatment was a greatly improved sense of smell and therefore of taste. While on the one hand I thought “Duh…”, on the other, my improved senses persisted during a following three-week trip in Asia, and it was delightful to smell trees and plants with new appreciation. (New thing for fashionable hotel lobbies is apparently their ‘exclusive hotel fragrance..’ Quite nice, most of them.)

    I also noticed much easier breathing and better overall muscle oxygenation when climbing to the top of Hong Kong’s steep multistoried staircases. I would normally notice some fatigue or burn in my leg quadriceps when climbing multiple staircases first thing in the morning without a proper preliminary warmup. But here I was good.

    So I ordered the Vielight 810 (and many thanks to Silvana for her patience with my emails from Cambodia!)

    It was waiting for me when I returned to North America with 13+ hours of west-to-east jetlag, which is the most brutal. It normally takes me 6 or 7 days to recover my normal sleeping, eating and energy patterns from Asia.

    I had also picked up a heavy cold and cough, the sort you can get on a long flight.

    I began using the Vielight once a day in the morning.

    Remarkably, I recovered completely from the jetlag in about 3 days, half the normal time. My hubby was groggy for the normal 7 days.

    My energy levels were steady through the day, I slept well throughout the night, my appetite quickly returned to my normal pattern.

    [NB: My most effective jetlag recovery trick – and I’ve tried them all - is to go outdoors into the bright sunlight at 1:00 pm local time wherever you arrive for about an hour. Skip lunch, whatever, but get into the light. Research shows that the bright sunlight spectrum – of which infrared and near-infrared is a part – seems to quickly “reset” the body’s circadian clock to local time. So using the Vielight the same way – to “light up” the brain, makes perfect sense to me. I also leave the hotel blackout drapes open a tad overnight, to allow a sense of local sunrise in the morning.]

    After 30 days, the biggest difference I notice from using the Vielight is in the quality – and quantity – of my sleep.

    • I am sleeping deeply throughout the night and awakening refreshed.

    • If I awaken during the night, I can fall asleep again quickly and even re-enter the same dream – a skill I last had as a teenager but which had faded since.

    • I can remember my dreams more easily and completely.

    • I am sleeping longer hours overall. I normally need at least 8 hours sleep to function well, but now I am sleeping as many as 10 hours or more (which may also be due to recovery from that cold). But this also suggests, perhaps?, there may be some “rewiring or repair” going on in my brain akin to the remodeling that happens during adolescence, since teens are also heavy sleepers. I don’t know. It’s just a thought.

    • There seems to be a very, very slight improvement in my visual acuity – in the speed and clarity at which I can focus my vision. I am quite nearsighted, with a prescription that has been stable for more than 20 years, but it does seem to me that when I remove my glasses and look into the distance, I can bring things into focus at least as well and as quickly as I could many years ago. I have sometimes used pinhole eyeglasses to strengthen my ocular muscles and that has been helpful, but I have not used them in about 3 years. The results I am seeing here are at least as good as the best results I’ve had with the visual exercises.

    • This is difficult to quantify, but I do seem to be experiencing a general, overall improvement in mood and sense of well-being. This may be subjective, of course, but it could also be the natural outcome of the better sleep brought by the Vielight.

    • I think it is too soon to say whether there are any changes in my short-term memory – that ‘forgetting’ that happens to me when I go into another room to fetch something and forget what it was… That will require a bit more testing, I think.

    Overall, I’m happy with the Vielight’s effects. It’s easy to use; I’ve have had no negative experiences or side effects, and I’ll continue to use it daily or thereabouts. Skeptical hubby is now curious to try it as well.

    Cheers,

    Selene
    Last edited by Selene; 27th April 2017 at 20:51. Reason: replace photo URL

  18. The Following 17 Users Say Thank You to Selene For This Post:

    avid (5th May 2017), Bill Ryan (27th April 2017), BMJ (29th April 2017), Bob (27th April 2017), celticwarrior (27th April 2017), Eram (27th April 2017), Ernie Nemeth (30th April 2017), Ewan (27th April 2017), fourty-two (27th April 2017), Heart2hearth (27th April 2017), kanishk (28th April 2017), leavesoftrees (11th May 2017), Ol' Roy (6th May 2017), Olaf (28th April 2017), Reinhard (21st May 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (27th April 2017), sheme (27th April 2017)

  19. Link to Post #130
    United States Avalon Greeter: Here to help
     
    Ron Mauer Sr's Avatar
    Join Date
    5th January 2011
    Location
    Lovingston, VA
    Age
    74
    Posts
    1,562
    Thanks
    10,526
    Thanked 12,139 times in 1,503 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Day 38 with the Vielight 655 Prime.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Day38.png
Views:	7
Size:	366.7 KB
ID:	35239
    I can see why using this in a public place would attract much attention.

    The only change I detect may be with more ETs showing up in dreams.

    I've missed a few sessions but I am approximately 93% compliant with instructions.

  20. The Following 12 Users Say Thank You to Ron Mauer Sr For This Post:

    avid (5th May 2017), Baby Steps (11th May 2017), BMJ (5th May 2017), celticwarrior (11th May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (9th May 2017), Ewan (5th May 2017), fourty-two (5th May 2017), JRS (5th May 2017), kanishk (12th May 2017), Sam Hunter (11th May 2017), sheme (11th May 2017), TargeT (5th May 2017)

  21. Link to Post #131
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    13,685
    Thanks
    38,517
    Thanked 176,045 times in 12,095 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    A minor update. I went to see Patrick Coady yesterday, having used the Vielight now for over 3 months. My blood oxygen was 97% at base, 99% at peak. Patrick told me that was the highest level he'd ever seen in 5 years in people at this high altitude (9,000 ft, where I live) who weren't actually born here.

    Before the Vielight, it was 94% base, 98% peak. That's still pretty healthy, but the difference was a large one. Anything below 90% is trigger for medical concern, so this seemingly small increment was actually quite something.

    There's a good article about all this, here: (and many others, of course: just look for 'blood oxygen levels')
    Blood oxygen is quite important, because it's kind of what keeps us alive. So for anyone with any non-optimal condition at all, raising blood oxygen is one of the interventions that can really make a broad-based difference in terms of supporting healing of every kind. Interesting stuff.

  22. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    7alon (11th May 2017), BMJ (13th May 2017), celticwarrior (11th May 2017), DebJoy (11th May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (27th May 2017), kanishk (12th May 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (11th May 2017), Sam Hunter (11th May 2017), Selene (21st May 2017), sheme (11th May 2017)

  23. Link to Post #132
    UK Avalon Member Nick Matkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    17th March 2012
    Posts
    1,283
    Thanks
    1,288
    Thanked 4,131 times in 1,139 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    A minor update. I went to see Patrick Coady yesterday, having used the Vielight now for over 3 months. My blood oxygen was 97% at base, 99% at peak. Patrick told me that was the highest level he'd ever seen in 5 years in people at this high altitude (9,000 ft, where I live) who weren't actually born here.

    Before the Vielight, it was 94% base, 98% peak. That's still pretty healthy, but the difference was a large one. Anything below 90% is trigger for medical concern, so this seemingly small increment was actually quite something.

    There's a good article about all this, here: (and many others, of course: just look for 'blood oxygen levels')
    Blood oxygen is quite important, because it's kind of what keeps us alive. So for anyone with any non-optimal condition at all, raising blood oxygen is one of the interventions that can really make a broad-based difference in terms of supporting healing of every kind. Interesting stuff.
    Might the blood oxygen levels have anything to do with you living at probably 8,000 to 10,000 feet? Were the tests done at sea level or where you live?

  24. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Nick Matkin For This Post:

    BMJ (13th May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (27th May 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (11th May 2017), Sam Hunter (11th May 2017)

  25. Link to Post #133
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    7th February 2010
    Location
    Ecuador
    Posts
    13,685
    Thanks
    38,517
    Thanked 176,045 times in 12,095 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    Quote Posted by Nick Matkin (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    A minor update. I went to see Patrick Coady yesterday, having used the Vielight now for over 3 months. My blood oxygen was 97% at base, 99% at peak. Patrick told me that was the highest level he'd ever seen in 5 years in people at this high altitude (9,000 ft, where I live) who weren't actually born here.

    Before the Vielight, it was 94% base, 98% peak. That's still pretty healthy, but the difference was a large one. Anything below 90% is trigger for medical concern, so this seemingly small increment was actually quite something.

    There's a good article about all this, here: (and many others, of course: just look for 'blood oxygen levels')


    Blood oxygen is quite important, because it's kind of what keeps us alive. So for anyone with any non-optimal condition at all, raising blood oxygen is one of the interventions that can really make a broad-based difference in terms of supporting healing of every kind. Interesting stuff.
    Might the blood oxygen levels have anything to do with you living at probably 8,000 to 10,000 feet? Were the tests done at sea level or where you live?
    At 9,000 ft, the blood oxygen levels will be lower in everyone, for sure, except maybe those whose families have lived here for generations.

    A healthy person at sea level should have a base of 99-100%. So considering the altitude, my base/peak of 97/99% was literally pretty much as good as it can get. I was chuffed, as they say in England.

  26. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Bill Ryan For This Post:

    BMJ (13th May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (27th May 2017), Foxie Loxie (11th May 2017), kanishk (12th May 2017), Nick Matkin (11th May 2017)

  27. Link to Post #134
    Germany Avalon Member
    Join Date
    18th July 2014
    Location
    Germany
    Age
    55
    Posts
    201
    Thanks
    624
    Thanked 1,421 times in 193 posts

    Default Re: The Vielight intranasal laser: kickstarting the pineal gland?

    My experience with the Syrolight BioNase intranasal red laser light device

    Here’s my 30-Day Report on using my Bionase (660 nm laser, continuous light).
    This device is labelled as “Nasal Allergic Rhinitis Relief Treatment Machine”.

    Device: Syrolight BioNase
    Price: 5 $ (aliexpress.com) … 68 $ (via syrolight.com)
    Light: continuous red light, not pulsed, a pair of two intranasal lasers, 8…12 mW

    Application: daily, 20 minutes
    Improves blood oxygen saturation: Yes
    Stimulation of pineal gland: Not noticeable in the first month

    The device is powered by a 9V block, consuming 32 mA.
    One 9V block is sufficient for 1 month daily use (20 minutes).

    First I used the dual laser during my morning meditations. But it distracted me too much from calming my mind.

    So I switched to applying the laser when listening to the quite powerfull “936 Hz pineal gland activation” soundtrack (Source vibrations)

    1. week
    starting from 3 minutes: light burning sensation under the skull/in meninges
    after 8 minutes: same sensations on the edges of the tongue
    after 20 minutes: strange sensation in the teeth, that lasts for several hours

    I had the same sensation within seconds after an infusion of oxygen.
    Also I had the same sensations when participating in “Quantum light breath” sessions (a breathing therapy created by Jeru Kabbal, which mainly is a kind of music-assisted hyperventilation for about an hour).
    So probably these are sensations of (over)saturation with oxygen.

    Note:
    Oxygen is not always good. It is important to have well functioning antioxidant protection systems in your body when doing this kind of stimulation.

    That is: glutathione production (from cysteine), vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A
    Otherwise free radicals will react with fatty acids, co-enzyme Q10, lipoate thus destroying these substances in the body which leads to mitochondrial dysfunctions.

    2.week
    dreams are more intense
    streaming of sexual energy through the body has improved

    3. week + 4 week
    sensations in skull and teeth become less intense, or I got used to that feeling

    Clearly improved oxygen saturation in blood. No symptoms of Pineal gland activation so far.
    Last edited by Olaf; 21st May 2017 at 14:00.

  28. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Olaf For This Post:

    Bill Ryan (21st May 2017), BMJ (21st May 2017), Ernie Nemeth (27th May 2017), fourty-two (21st May 2017), kanishk (22nd May 2017), Reinhard (22nd May 2017), Ron Mauer Sr (21st May 2017), Selene (21st May 2017)

+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1 7

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts