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    United States Avalon Member Skywizard's Avatar
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    Default Monks that mummified themselves to death




    Over 1,000 years ago, a practice was pioneered by a Japanese priest named Kukai, which was intended to demonstrate the ultimate act of religious discipline and dedication – self-mummification. The practice, known as Sokushinbutsu, was a ritual observed over numerous years, which culminated in death and the complete preservation of the body. If successful, the monk was posthumously placed in a temple for others to see and honor.

    Kukai (774 – 835 AD) was a Japanese monk, civil servant, scholar, poet, artist, and founder of an esoteric sect known as Shingon, which combined elements from Buddhism, Old Shinto, Taoism, and other religions. He and his followers practiced Shugendo, a philosophy based on achieving spiritual power through discipline and self-denial. Towards the end of his life, Kukai went into a state of deep meditation and denied all food and water, eventually leading to his voluntary death. He was entombed on Mount Koya in Wakayama prefecture. Some time later, the tomb was opened and Kukai, known posthumously as Kobo-Daishi, was supposedly found as if sleeping, his complexion unchanged and his hair healthy and strong.


    Kukai meditating to his death on Mount Koya


    Since that time, the process of sokushinbutsu developed and evolved, and the process of self-mummification came to be practiced by a number of dedicated followers of the Shingon sect. The practitioners of sokushinbutsu did not view this practice as an act of suicide, but rather as a form of further enlightenment.

    In Living Buddhas: The Self-Mummified Monks of Yamagata, Japan , Ken Jeremiah points out that many religions have viewed the incorruptibility of the corpse as a sign of special grace or supernatural ability.

    The process of self-mummification

    The steps involved in mummifying one’s own body were extremely rigorous and painful. For the first 1,000 days, the monks ceased all food except nuts, seeds, fruits and berries and they engaged in extensive physical activity to strip themselves of all body fat.

    For the next one thousand days, their diet was restricted to just bark and roots. Near the end of this period, they would drink poisonous tea made from the sap of the Urushi tree, which caused vomiting and a rapid loss of body fluids. It also acted as a preservative and killed off maggots and bacteria that would cause the body to decay after death.

    In the final stage, after more than six years of torturous preparation, the monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would go into a state of meditation. He was seated in the lotus position, a position he would not move from until he died. A small air tube provided oxygen to the tomb. Each day, the monk rang a bell to let the outside world know he was still alive. When the bell stopped ringing, the tube was removed and the tomb sealed for the final thousand day period of the ritual.

    At the end of this period, the tomb would be opened to see if the monk was successful in mummifying himself. If the body was found in a preserved state, the monk was raised to the status of Buddha, his body was removed from the tomb and he was placed in a temple where he was worshiped and revered. If the body had decomposed, the monk was resealed in his tomb and respected for his endurance, but not worshiped.


    A Shindon monk who achieved self-mummification



    This ancient practice of self-mummification continued until the 19th century when it was outlawed by the Japanese government. Today, sokushinbutsu is not advocated or practiced by any Buddhist sect.
    It is believed that many hundreds of monks attempted sokushinbutsu, but only 28 are known to have achieved mummification, many of whom can be visited in various temples in Japan. The most famous is Shinnyokai Shonin of the Dainichi-Boo Temple on the holy Mount Yudono. Others can be found in Nangakuji Temple, in the suburbs of Tsuruoka, and at Kaikokuji Temple in the small city of Sakata.


    Shinnyokai Shonin of the Dainichi-Boo Temple on the holy Mount Yudono





    Source: http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-...o-death-012938


    peace...
    ~~ One foot in the Ancient World and the other in the Now ~~

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    Avalon Member Carmody's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    ouchie .
    Interdimensional Civil Servant

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    United States Moderator Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    ...and then they were greeted at the loving tunnel of white light by a huge floating face palm emoji.
    Last edited by Mike; 30th March 2017 at 06:51.

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    Avalon Member lunaflare's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    That was interesting, but not the most loving path to tread.
    poisonous tea and a life of disciplined self denial;
    self-mutilation in the quest for mummification (and posthumous worship)

    [I]In the final stage, after more than six years of torturous preparation, the monk would lock himself in a stone tomb barely larger than his body, where he would go into a state of meditation.[/

    Relief, I would imagine...

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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    a really 'stoopid' question on my part:

    "A Shindon monk who achieved self-mummification"; as to the photo accompaning this explaination;

    from where did the sunglasses come?

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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    I would not want to go that way. I opt for the quick exit and no worshipers.

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    Avalon Member Satori's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    Can someone explain the sun glasses on the one mummy? I assume it is for the benefit of the viewers and visitors, as I doubt the mummy needs them.

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    Avalon Member lunaflare's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    maybe enlightenment is too much illumination for the eyes?!

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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    Contrast this with, to the best of memory, the August 1980 issue of Smithsonian which had an article about a Jesuit man who visited many parts of Southeast Asia. His body did not decay after death. They cut him up for relics and gave them to the many settlements he ministered. One box somewhere with a finger was opened after around 200 years. The finger was still supple with good color showing no signs of decay.
    Those frisky Japanese. They do come up with some fascinating practices. Now the Tibetans would venerate the remains of a practitioner who produced a rainbow body at death, remained in what they call tukdam where the body remains warm around the heart and does not decay for at least three days. The 16th Karmapa died at a hospital in Cleveland a little over 20 years ago. He gave instructions to leave him alone for three days. He remained in tukdam and then was placed in a box/coffin for transport back to India. When the casket was opened in a week or so his body had shrunk by 50%. If "pearls" appear after cremation your incarnation will be revered also.

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    Avalon Member Lifebringer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    Isn't this just the practice of self starvation and dehydration? Well imo...all those starving children of poorer nations, with no access to water must be saints on the way out?
    How are you in service to anyone other than achieving a divine way out for yourself? Or is this the way they train their people to come out of body to go into the afterlife frequency?
    Don't understand its reasonong...maybe its me.
    jmo

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    Mexico Avalon Member Lakeofmarch's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monks that mummified themselves to death

    Kukai himself didn't do this, from my sources (Nicholoff's "Sacred Koyasan"), or at least the body is never visible to the public, they send in a new robe every year but it only gets to the nearest temple, not to the tomb.. I remember a documentary on this at the beginning of my reading journey on such subjects, actually just after finishing "Foucault's Pendulum". A bit of the same subject in both, the still point in the heavens of here-is-now, and you don't have to be dead to reach it; that is the real core of the Shingon message.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Womb_Realm
    Last edited by Lakeofmarch; 25th September 2019 at 22:08.

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