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    France Administrator Hervé's Avatar
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    Default Air Crete Dome Homes

    Air Crete Dome Homes – Video

    By Robert May 13, 2017



    Nothing to do with the coming ice age, but I find this concept fascinating.

    Commenting on youtube, Mark Soares thinks Foam Cement is “the BEST building material in the world.”

    “It is an ultra light masonry product weighing only 1/5 of the weight of ordinary concrete,” says Soares. “It is composed of 1 part water, 1 part cement (which is powdered or ground limestone), 1 part non toxic dish soap. The detergent is foamed using air from a compressor and a pump or motor to agitate the mixture (I use a conventional drill and paint mixer to blend it all together and it works fine). The expansion of trapped materials results in ”air” or oxygen molecules which comprise the majority of the material (I believe close to 80%) upon expansion.”

    Soares adds that “it’s fire proof, water proof, insulating, bulletproof, earthquake proof, hurricane and monsoon proof, impervious to insects, rodents provides acoustic insulation and is 100% free of toxic of harmful substances, which makes it 100% biodegradable and completely recyclable. It is all natural and produces no by products. Also, as if it weren’t’ enough, it won’t rot, rust, corrode, warp under cold or heat or otherwise decompose in at least 30 years for my home so far.”

    Thanks to Laurel for this video



    Mark Soares 6 months ago
    Foam Cement or Autoclave Aerated Cement is in my opinion, the BEST building material in the world. In Germany for example, it is used in 60% of all buildings. It is an ultra light masonry product, weighing only 1/5 of the weight of ordinary concrete. It is composed of 1 part water, 1 part cement (which is powdered or ground limestone), 1 part non toxic dish soap. The detergent is foamed using air from a compressor and a pump or motor to agitate the mixture (I use a conventional drill and paint mixer to blend it all together and it works fine). The expansion of trapped materials results in ''air'' or oxygen molecules which comprise the majority of the material (I believe close to 80%) upon expansion.

    It's fire proof, water proof, insulating, bulletproof (U.S army used the foam for ballistic testing, look it up) and earthquake proof, hurricane and monsoon proof, impervious to insects, rodents provides acoustic insulation and is 100% free of toxic of harmful substances, which makes it 100% biodegradable and completely recyclable. It is all natural and produces no by products.

    Also, as if it weren't' enough, it won't rot, rust, corrode, warp under cold or heat or otherwise decompose in at least 30 years for my home so far.

    The future was invented in 1923, but the powerful lumber and steel industries of America have lobbied hard to keep AAC uncertified for U.S. building codes. But there's a bunch of countries in Asia and Europe that have awakened to this super accessible, high quality low cost housing.

    This is not the building material of the future, it can be the building of the present. Just imagine a home for every human being on earth. That is my mission. 9 billion people, starting with me. May peace be with you, and remember the wise words of some unknown deep soul: A dream begins with a dreamer.


    http://www.domegaia.com/air-crete1.html
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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    Nice. Next thing you know they will be using this material to print out new homes in minutes. 3D printing meets AAC.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    Good ideas reinvent themselves, upon rediscovery, and are improved upon, as in this case, with exceptions that should be noted, from a builder and craftsman's experience.

    A continuous pour of the liquid material creates the strongest structure and is better than the block method, as each joint is a weak point. Anchoring to a deep foundation with continuous connection to the walls is also important. Seismic strength must also be a factor, noting the breaking point of the materials involved. (Do they need connective anchoring that has "give" in earthquakes, as in the common sense building codes of earthquake prone areas?)


    On the extreme end of building there are companies that make a dome-shaped, metal rebar cage and inflate an inner bladder and an outer bladder which holds the form while the concrete is curing. These structures are considered the strongest in holding up to even hurricane force winds, as most domed structures are, yet this method is very expensive and highly labor intensive.

    When we look at the traditional building of earthen structures in the Himalayas we see an ages' old insight into dealing with earthquakes that has been overlooked in building, even with earthen blocks, for many decades. Those details that seemed to be ornamental designs, horizontally placed in bands around the building, every 4 to 6 feet apart, measuring from 6 inches to 18 inches thick, gave the walls the ability to absorb the energy of earth tremors.

    When, either by lack of wood availability or dismissal of the design as merely customary or ceremonial/religious in nature, the absorbent material was not included into the design of those newer buildings that failed during earthquakes, as those with the built in design elements faired much better. Some western engineers now teach locals to place extruded metal mattes, diamond lathe, horizontally every 4 feet when building these mountainous dwellings. I mention this as the concern for seismic absorption must be taken into account when building anywhere. The tradeoffs from the strength of a monolithic structure to one with some built-in ability to absorb movement should be noted.

    It takes a relatively large amount of energy, BTU's, to create cement when we look at the true ecology, availability and cost of using this method. Yet, in all of the ways I see using cement this is the most cost effective and ecological use, so far. The modern use in Germany of air-entrained cement building is not a surprise, as their earth-building guilds have for many centuries been innovators in construction methods, methods that not only provide longevity, but also breathability, strength and comfortable enclosures.

    I notice that there is a small skylight at the top of some of the these domes, which is a good idea. A common failure of many air-tight structures is not incorporating air flow into the structure, creating stale, uncirculated air. This air is not healthy and contains an increasingly higher amount of carbon dioxide and lower amounts of oxygen for those inside. This is mitigated in most well-built modern, western dwellings as HVAC, heating-ventilating and air conditioning, systems intake external air to increase the natural amount of healthy oxygen-laden air for living more naturally, but this is not economically practical at all in developing countries.

    Simple solutions to this are the use of fine metal mesh, small enough to prevent most insect penetrations, built down low and up high in the structure, covering air openings large enough to circulate air throughout the interior.

    Whenever you build make sure you understand the health of the materials that will live with you as you live inside. Some paints and coating materials, as well as furniture, outgas volatile organic compounds, VOC's, for a long time and this exposure compromises the integrity of the immune system, resulting with conditions ranging from allergic reactions to cancer. In an airtight environment the level of toxicity allows for higher exposure and greater risk to our health.

    Consider also that mold can cause many serious health issues. In most cases, as in a house that the great, caring, well-loved environmentalist Erin Brockovich lived in, mold is captured and sequestered within a structure when moisture, usually thru rain penetration from poor or old roofing, siding or cracked stucco, or flooding, is held inside and allowed to grow. There are now devices that can easily detect mold so that it can be removed. Oftentimes we can smell mold when we are in it's presence. Remember that we breathe along with the buildings we occupy.

    A note to friends in the states and elsewhere: When the regulatory agencies banned lead and mercury in paints in the late 70's they had an exception to the ban, a "grandfather" clause. If any company had an excess of a material in hand when the ban went into effect they often were allowed to sell that product until it was out of stock. This means that we should test any painted or treated surface with an inexpensive lead test before living in or renting out any building.
    Last edited by Hym; 13th May 2017 at 17:36.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    cant wait to try this. I wonder if they use ordinary portland cement or just pure grounded limestone

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    That's a good question Bubu. In the mixing it looks like Portland cement, but some of the lighter colored blocks look like pure limestone. I've mixed thousands of wheel barrels of mortar and concrete mixes and see most of it is portland cement in the videos, of course mixed with the soap ingredients, entrained with air as it naturally does.
    Boy, those small dome homes are built with a great sense of quality in mind. Inspiring, they are.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    Quote Posted by Hym (here)
    That's a good question Bubu. In the mixing it looks like Portland cement, but some of the lighter colored blocks look like pure limestone. I've mixed thousands of wheel barrels of mortar and concrete mixes and see most of it is portland cement in the videos, of course mixed with the soap ingredients, entrained with air as it naturally does.
    Boy, those small dome homes are built with a great sense of quality in mind. Inspiring, they are.
    thanks for the suggestion. across the street there is a car wash that use foam. its getting closer to reality

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    These domed houses look promising, however the cost of construction materials is probably not the biggest barrier, its labour and skills. One can buy a house kit here in canada for aprroximately $25k cad, this includes all the materials such as wiring, plumbing, windows, doors and roofing. To erect it with paid labour costs at least an additional three times more, not including land, well and septic. These little domed cement houses might be good in the tropics, where you can have screened windows and vents and an outhouse, but even then you need electrical and doors/windows plus labour to erect. Looks like something that might work well in a village setting where everyone chips in to erect multiple dwellings, but you still need skilled workers for carpentry, wiring and cement work.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    Good eyes, Justplain. I too did note that none of the utilities we have become accustomed to were included in the building of those homes. Also, the wages of skilled craftsmen in Thailand are much lower than those who provide us their skills in the states and Canada. This is a major point to consider as it is highly impractical, costly and sometimes dangerous to add utilities, especially in domes, after the shell is finished.

    You might consider taking on learning just one of those basic skills in the form of building a small workshop, green house, or reading, music space away from your main dwelling. This will give you an idea of the time and cost it would take to build an entire house as well as allow you the time to watch the details of building as they develop.

    It is often the case to see homeowners, or renters with the consent of the owners, add on a room or two to an existing home, a room that contains the elements you want to have in your living space.

    Another option, common in the states, is to buy an inexpensive, used mobil home and place it on a piece of land you will eventually build an entire house on. My only concern with such houses is the need to seal all cabinetry and sub-flooring materials with a natural, no VOC, paint or sealant to prevent the outgassing of the formaldehyde active in particle board and o.s.b. paneling and flooring, the major building components in mobil homes. I have seen some mobil homes remove those materials and replace them with natural woods and stone products that outgas little or not at all, transforming an unhealthy space into a healthy living atmosphere.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    while the dome shape is more stable than all other shapes it also makes it more complicated to construct. A flat paneling with groves for plumbing and electrical can be incorporated easily on flat surfaces. I presume that since its made of cement it can be plastered with ease after the plumbing and electrical layout or maybe one can simply cut through it with a diamond concrete cutting wheel which I presume to be 5 times easier than cutting through an ordinary concrete. since the material cost only a fraction of the ordinary concrete maybe it is better to make the flat walls thicker to compensate for the strength then maybe we dont have to spend that much on labor, form works and shipping since it allows for flat packaging and then you also have the advantage of more insulation. precast flat panels at a fraction of weight is just too easy to assembly. I think I will go for flat panels instead or maybe a flat paneling that is a cross between a pyramid and a box house could be more stable.

    The problem with dome shape is the initial investment for form works which is out of reach of ordinary contractors then we have big business monopoly. dome shape is not pro poor. Flat panels wont require or only require very little onsite form works. precast panels can be manufactured somewhere just like ordinary concrete block and delivered on site. Another idea that is not too far remove from the block system and is closer to reality is to make form blocks with the aircrete material. and then pour an ordinary concrete or better else aircrete in the assembled form blocks. form blocks http://cluckconstruction.com/what-we...oncrete-forms/
    Last edited by Bubu; 15th May 2017 at 05:06.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    Yes, domes have some difficulties in building, but those challenges are always simplified when we go step by step, and the challenges become skills we acquire. It must be said here, as I have noted in other places on this site, that domes are much different to live in than square or rectangular spaces. The sound is different, the space feels more natural, the sleep is easier to get into, energy is translated and interacted with without edges. Even cylindrical living spaces and teepees are more suited to the human energetic field than those stale structures that have been built for so many years.

    I know this is all lengthly, but it is worth a look into how disconnected the expansion of humans into and away from healthy living spaces has become, and it all starts with the living spaces we build and live in. It is a precious subject when we look at consciousness, soul, spirit and the heart, the real worth of living.

    This is why I see the spaces of Frank Lloyd Wright as being so extremely contradictory. I call them brilliantly superficial, plastic dimensionality. The sign of a crippled, but always incorrectly nurtured, ego. Some good, some of great quality, some energetically way off. Maybe only a BaaGua practitioner would get the obvious energetic miscues, corners, dead ends. Proof of Frank's disconnect was his initial great opposition to the naturalist engineer Jens Jensen, the man most responsible for creating amazingly natural, outdoor living parks. He ultimately had to not only acknowledge Jens' connection with nature as an important ingredient in livable urban design, but had to give Jens credit for insisting on integrating nature into the overall value of architectural placement. .

    I have worked on wooden domes, from Monterey Dome Homes, with interconnecting metal hub plates that slip into and are bolted thru the ends of 2x4's, making both pentagons(5) and hexagons(6). These are covered on the exterior with plywood sheets, insulated between 2x4's, and internally covered with drywall. In most domes the form starts with short, stub walls, 4 to 6 feet tall, anchored to the floor and then continued with the dome shape on top of those walls. This makes building internal, separating walls easier to build where they connect to the external form, not having to deal with an internal wall meeting the irregular shape of a circular connection.

    I have also built, with friends, earthen adobe domes and buttressed adobe spaces with vaulted barrel ceilings, roofs. Though labor intensive the results of building and living in those spaces was very enjoyable and very rewarding, in many ways. Best built, as with most homes, communally, with friends and those we would do well to get to know.

    I have worked with lightweight, insulated concrete forms, which are polystyrene blocks with a hollow core, and a mesh system of internal support, in this case a hardened plastic that continues on the outside of the block in strips that help hold the form when the pressure of the fill concrete, that internally connects the stacked blocks and gives a wall (and all connected walls) it's structural strength, pushes outwards. The connected hardened plastic that gives the entire form it's strengths, continues on the outside and makes furring strips, set flush with the outside surface, that are then used, after the concrete pour, as anchoring for the internal connections of drywall (gypsum/plasterboard) or panelling and externally for siding or metal mesh attachments for either siding or stucco scratch/ brown/ finish coating or brown (smooth coat)and elastomeric finish coats.

    Long, adjustable metal bracing, fastened to the floor and the wall system, helps hold the walls in line during the concrete infill and until the concrete stabilizes, but we had to pay attention to that great pressure in case of a wall area blowing outwards and the concrete then pouring out of the forms/blocks. In this case those ICF's that have a system of interlocking cutouts where the blocks meet horizontally, on top and bottom, helping hold them together during stacking. Once the foundation, interconnecting metal rebar and flooring are ready for accepting the blocks it is fun putting these blocks together as they are so light and simple to connect, like child's play in serious building.

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    In the case of using air-entrained cement (not concrete which is portland cement, sand, gravel and water) I wonder if this type of infill would in combination be a strong enough total system to have such strength. What are the lateral strengths of air entrained cement forms and what is the minimal thickness required to have acceptable strengths for a permanent wall system? I would not entertain the idea of building this way without seeing the engineering stress and compression tests, which may be out there by now since the use of air entrained cement was invented 94 years ago, first. It's worth a look see if it saves time and money. Hey, shouldn't the Germans and their building engineers have that info, since they currently use it in their trades? I'd be surprised if they didn't. You might want to look into that, Bubu.

    I have also built temporary domes for meditation out of metal tubing covered in plastic tarp just to feel the effects of the energy interactions with me and my focus.

    Based on my very positive interaction with that form and the ease the form allowed me to gain insights, I very early on made a very long term evaluation of one group of people, who claimed to be yogis/meditators, who refused to allow a small sweat lodge, a hogan, on their land. I saw the deep manipulation that the rejection and exclusion of meditation in that sweat lodge, heated or not, stemmed from and thus had to readjust my intent and actions with those people, knowing that at some time later I would have to ultimately reject their company. Looking back I see that the negative, dark control that, no matter it's origins, was sourced by a heartless lack of being that instantly rejects the energetics of natural form.

    I spent many years visiting the land with my son during the long times of quiet, spreading the ashes of friends there, burying an animal companion, drinking the water from the deep well, enjoying the beautiful view beyond the time of the present valley's troubled inhabitants' lives....to leave in order to not be attacked and having to end the lives of others in self-defense....all for constantly stating the truth of the corruption of those who currently controlled the land. Knowing the land had been held for centuries before with those lost natural structures on it I could see their disconnect from the beginning.

    This is something that most people do not take into account and is the reason I have taken some time to give an introductory understanding to the methods of building more naturally, even if it is to plan far ahead into the future for others. Saying that we do not build in one more natural way because it is too labor intensive is a statement of laziness, and a capitulation to negative social control. There is never a shortage of labor when the reward is a more natural living space. The kinetic energy alive in the form of a building we live in and interact in is much more important to our well being than we know.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    There is a lot of bamboo house here and I can say that their energy is far better than concrete house. I haven't been in a concrete dome but I am willing to bet that that box bamboo house is far better than it energetically. Its more of a material that is used in building than the shape. Not saying that shape has no bearing. I've been wanting to build an earth dome because I can feel its energy even though haven't been to one. Maybe because I have been to all sorts of natural caves.

    "This is something that most people do not take into account and is the reason I have taken some time to give an introductory understanding to the methods of building more naturally, even if it is to plan far ahead into the future for others. Saying that we do not build in one more natural way because it is too labor intensive is a statement of laziness, and a capitulation to negative social control. There is never a shortage of labor when the reward is a more natural living space. The kinetic energy alive in the form of a building we live in and interact in is much more important to our well being than we know.




    Not saying that we dont build dome houses I am only more concerned of solving the problem one step at a time and not jump into more promising project and in the process fell short of the target. I'm no longer the type who shoots for the moon. Well for my own leaving space its doable. I'm a professional builder and I can assure you I am no lazy type. When I think of ordinary folks though I simply dont see it becoming closer to reality. well maybe not just yet. as I have said I am more receptive to things that are more doable. Or maybe its doable but not acceptable to the masses, which concern me more. Nobody ( except for those who have excess money) is going to pay for a dome shape labor intensive and expensive wooden or earth house unless they have first tried the cheaper box earth house. Thats how reality goes thats how our freedom of thinking been suppress. I am very much aware of this because I have introduce many new products my own creations, simple devices/inventions. It was all a fiasco simply because people cant wrap their heads on it. But then we live thousand miles apart and here many people will be of concern that their dome house will not stand out to earthquake

    Thanks for the lengthy and insightful post.
    Last edited by Bubu; 16th May 2017 at 00:02.

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    We are going to build a Solar Go and Grow House in rainy Oregon. It will have a manual toilet as funded by the Gates Foundation.

    We are offering a FREE 8-week course on how to build an Air-Crete Greenhouse Building. We are looking for volunteers who are willing to meet weekly. Participates will learn how to make and use Air-Crete. Course starts on Saturday June 24, 2017 and will continue for 8 weeks on Saturdays 1 – 6 pm in Lincoln City, Oregon. Participation in limited RSVP 541-765-2109

    Air-Crete Greenhouse details at: http://www.GoAndGrowHouse.com

    The Go & Grow House© will be using five key elements necessary for a productive passive greenhouse: solar input; heat storage; and conservation.

    Collecting, converting, and storing is accomplished through the use of:

    • Orientation
    • Double Wall Glazing
    • Thermal Water Heat Storage
    • Super Insulation
    • Venting

    At the Sustainable Living Center of Oregon (www.SustainableLivingCenterOregon.com) we do research in the areas of: food, water, energy and shelter. During our research, we have come a across a low-cost method of building. It is called Air-Crete.

    Air-Crete is made by making air bubbles and mixing them into concrete. There are other techniques similar. They are called by many names such as: cellular concrete, foam concrete, light weight concrete, aerated concrete, ACC etc. They are made by putting something in the concrete that will make gas bubbles. Aluminum powder is introduced to the concrete and reacts with calcium hydroxide and water to form hydrogen. The hydrogen gas foams and doubles the volume of the raw mix creating gas bubbles.. At the end of the foaming process, the hydrogen escapes into the atmosphere and is replaced by air. Regardless of which method is use, the performance characteristics of the end product are the nearly the same.

    The AirCrete method can be used by non-skilled workers to build affordable buildings. It is possible to get a 1000 sq ft dome, under roof, for less than $4000 in material cost.

    To prove it is possible, we will be offering a Free 8-week course starting Saturday 1 – 6 pm June 24, 2017 to build an Air-Crete greenhouse with non-skilled workers.

    We are in negotiation with the designer of "The Dome", to build a Dome with Air-Crete at the Siletz Moorage in November. He will visit us for the solar eclipse in August. Since the Siletz Moorage is in Lincoln county, both buildings will only be only 200 sq ft.

    We believe this new building method can be a possible solution of providing afforded housing and year around growing.

    We have up loaded the presentation and it can be seen on youtube at:

    Greenhouse - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvvxxXEt-ls

    Dome Designer - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OMoU53Fe5s&t=18s

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    Default Re: Air Crete Dome Homes

    That's so cool taxmoms. I hope you get a big turnout and keep going. Go for it! Have Fun!
    Hymn

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