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Thread: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

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    Avalon Member Bob's Avatar
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    Default Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Abstract
    "Psychopathy is characterized by a general antisocial lifestyle with behaviors including being selfish, manipulative, impulsive, fearless, callous, possibly domineering, and particularly lacking in empathy. Contagious yawning in our species has been strongly linked to empathy.

    "We exposed 135 students, male and female, who completed the Psychopathic Personality Inventory-Revised (PPI-R), to a yawning paradigm intended to induce a reactionary yawn. Further, we exposed males to an emotion-related startle paradigm meant to assess peripheral amygdalar reactivity.

    "We found that scores on the PPI-R subscale Coldheartedness significantly predicted a reduced chance of yawning. Further, we found that emotion-related startle amplitudes were predictive of frequency of contagious yawning. These data suggest that psychopathic traits may be related to the empathic nature of contagious yawning in our species."

    Quote Highlights

    We exposed males and females assessed on a measure of psychopathic traits (PPI-R) to a contagious yawning paradigm.

    We used an emotion-related startle paradigm to assess electromyographic startle amplitudes in males.

    Scores on the affective component of the PPI-R are negatively related to contagious yawning for males and females.

    Other components of the PPI-R were not related to contagious yawning.

    Startle amplitudes are predictive of contagious yawning frequency in males.

    Did you yawn?

    ref:
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...91886915003645
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-...ing-180956386/

    Yawning in the animal world

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scienc...ves-180952484/

    Quote Evidence of contagious yawning in chimps, dogs and now wolves suggests that the behavior is linked to a mammalian sense of empathy
    "Among humans, even thinking about yawning can trigger the reflex, leading some to suspect that catching a yawn is linked to our ability to empathize with other humans.

    "For instance, contagious yawning activates the same parts of the brain that govern empathy and social know-how. And some studies have shown that humans with more fine-tuned social skills are more likely to catch a yawn."
    Life is a long lesson in humility. ~James M. Barrie

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Oh dear, I didn´t yawn **** I must be a psychopath then, nooooo!

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    No I didn't yawn. In fact, I went straight past yawn and right to sleep. Not sure if that makes me a psychopath or not. And since I don't walk in my sleep, ........ well, ..... the world is safe from me.
    I am enlightened, ............ Oh wait. That's just the police shining their spotlights on me.

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    Avalon Member Bob's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Quote Empathy and social know-how
    Lack of empathy

    https://psychopathresistance.wordpress.com/tag/empathy/



    Sociopaths have a profound lack of empathy for the feelings of others.

    They lack the internal feedback system by which normal people monitor themselves. (Most people call this “conscience,” which is probably as useful a term as any.)

    Sociopaths do not have this and don’t feel bad about abusing other people.

    It’s not that they feel bad and ignore it—they don’t feel it at all.



    Sociopaths understand that they are different from normal people and learn to mimic normal behavior.

    This mimicry has a purpose: It gets the sociopath what he or she wants.

    The Narcissist - ME ME ME ME ME - all about themselves, the world revolves because "they created it.." and everybody better agree with it or face their covert hostility

    The sociopath hides his or her difference.

    After letting it show a time or two—and probably being punished by a parent as a result—the sociopath covers up the truth and keeps it covered. But the reason for hiding it is not embarrassment (the sociopath doesn’t feel embarrassment), but because it hinders him from getting what he want.

    Since sociopaths have no empathy for others, making use of normal people feels just fine to them. Likewise, they feel no remorse.




    Empathy, as viewed by the sociopath, is a weakness, and he considers himself superior because he isn’t burdened by it.



    Because they lack an internal feedback system, sociopaths are excellent liars.

    For example, they can often pass lie detector tests, since those tests register the effects of our internal feedback system, which they don’t have.



    A sociopath is likely to maintain a group of people who believe wholeheartedly that he is a good, kind, honest person.

    He’ll work in calculated ways to create and maintain that opinion in them.



    ref:

    https://psychopathresistance.wordpress.com/tag/empathy/

    From They Walk Among Us by Paul Rosenberg



    Quote ... a general antisocial lifestyle with behaviors including being selfish, manipulative, impulsive, fearless, callous, possibly domineering, and particularly lacking in empathy.
    Last edited by Bob; 13th August 2017 at 01:41.
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    Avalon Member Bob's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    [..] Impulsive and Callous, possibly domineering...

    Quote Callous and unemotional traits ("CU" score) are distinguished by a persistent pattern of behavior that reflects a disregard for others, and also a lack of empathy and generally deficient affect.
    These traits are a conduct disorder.

    From: http://www.spring.org.uk/2016/10/6-signs-psychopath.php

    6 Subtle Signs That Someone Is A Psychopath

    http://changingminds.org/explanation...psychopath.htm

    The psychopathic personality is a particularly antisocial and predatory one. Characteristics include:
    • A high need for control.
    • Arrogant and confident sense of superiority and entitlement.
    • Easily bored, seeking stimulation and lacking fear.
    • No loyalty, empathy or concern for other people.
    • Callous use of lies, manipulation and other abuse.
    • No conscience, lacking guilt or remorse for anything they do, no matter how bad.
    • Cunning image management and shifting of blame.

    Quote Intelligent psychopaths use this in their manipulation of others.

    They typically at first appear charismatic and empathetic, although it is really just an act. In practice they are emotionally shallow and are far less sensitive than others to signs of fear, distress or disgust (and may feel nothing at all around this).

    Although they are often manipulative, they can also be impulsive and lacking in self-control.

    As children, they may have been classed as delinquent and shown significant signs of bed-wetting, animal abuse or fire-starting.
    Psychopaths who are successful in life are different from the less successful once in a single personality dimension: conscientiousness (which is also strongly related to self-control).

    Their ability to control themselves enables them to avoid impulsive acts (which are common in other psychopaths) which would give them away, hence allowing them to continue their manipulations with subtle care.

    'Success' for psychopaths often means power and control (which means not being caught). Even if they are successful in these ways, they may suffer in other ways, in particular having poor long-term and trusting relationships.

    Many confidence tricksters are psychopathic. The lack of concern for others and desire for control makes this an ideal career path.

    Individually they will befriend and then fleece vulnerable others. In business, they will work their way up and may even defraud the company of millions before disappearing into another alias.
    Last edited by Bob; 13th August 2017 at 15:33.
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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Dealing with a 'demanding' narcissistic psychopath

    Don't give in and expect that any answer you give will have any merit.

    https://pairedlife.com/etiquette/how...th-a-sociopath

    How to Communicate With a Psychopath: 3 Tips for Dealing With the Emotionally Stunted


    Don't even bother giving them the time of day.

    Quote Some People are Incapable of Growing Up

    The safest policy is to have no contact with such dysfunctional individuals.

    However, there will be times when you will have to deal with a psychopath, whether it be a co-worker, some confrontational clown at the movie theater, a family member you couldn't avoid - parent, sibling, child, etc. Or perhaps, you're trying to co-parent with one of these personality disordered individuals.

    I am not a professional; my advice comes from my own personal experience, and from a wealth of resources - books, websites, forums, etc. In my opinion, the following are the three most important things to know when interacting with a psychopath.

    It's also worth mentioning that true "communication" with one of these manipulators is not possible, so be aware of that going into any interaction with someone like this.

    It's a dance where they try to get into your head, and you either naively let them in, or put your guard up and try to maintain a good defense.

    *Note that I use the terms 'psychopath' and 'sociopath' interchangeably.

    I read somewhere that the difference between the two is that a sociopath is capable of showing loyalty within a group (think gang members), but a psychopath is loyal to no one. It's semantics. The jury seems to be out on what the difference is; experts have differing opinions on the subject.
    Recognize the signs. Easy to do. If you engage, well..
    Life is a long lesson in humility. ~James M. Barrie

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Avoiding playing into the Psychopath's well woven game.

    1. Establish Rock Solid Boundaries

    Stand Your Ground

    Psychopaths hate boundaries and, just like children, they will constantly test yours. If you are the child or spouse of someone who suffers from a personality disorder, it's very likely that you have weak boundaries or none at all. Think of establishing, and maintaining, strong boundaries as putting on your armor.

    Sociopaths try to make you feel as if you have no options. They are able to more easily manipulate you once they have made you feel powerless and defeated. Do not allow them to back you into a corner, to make you feel helpless or that you have no choice but to give in to their demands. You always have choices, you may just need to step back and figure out what they are.

    If you are being pressured, and you feel the need to remove yourself from a certain location, then do so. Go for a walk, head to the bathroom, take some deep breaths, and regain your composure. Once you have removed yourself from the emotionally charged setting, you'll be better able to assess the situation.

    If at all possible, do not get into a vehicle with them, because then you have no egress. However, if you do find yourself without an exit strategy, and the crazy is escalating, try to remain calm. Possible options are to simply ignore the personality disordered individual, repeat a mantra to yourself (for instance, "peace" or "calm"), or keep repeating a response out loud. An example would be to tell them (in the most serene and in-control tone of voice you can manage), "I refuse to speak to you when you're being irrational." Or, "I'm not comfortable having this conversation with you."

    Assertiveness will be interpreted as "mean" or "rude", because, by being assertive, you are maintaining a boundary. Never underestimate the sociopath's low self esteem and tendency to internalize anything that is said to them. No matter how narcissistic or grandiose they can appear to be, they inwardly detest themselves. Even minor, constructive criticism will be taken personally. Do not allow this to deter you from asserting yourself and protecting your personal space.



    2. Remain Calm

    Do Not Get Sucked Into the Drama

    They will try to paint a really impressive picture, showing how THEY are the victim - (they are not, they WANT victims surrounding them so they can dominate them).

    Keeping a cool head is the most important thing you can do in almost any situation, and it is imperative when communicating with a sociopath. You may find it helpful to remind yourself, before you are in the presence of the disordered person, to disengage. Prepare yourself emotionally, as they will try to get under your skin in any way that they possibly can.

    They enjoy pushing your buttons. Do not give them the desired response. Do not allow them to see that they are having any effect on you whatsoever. If they see that they have hit a nerve, they will keep digging at it. Be aware of what you are communicating non-verbally (fidgeting, teeth grinding, knuckle cracking, etc.).

    You cannot have a rational conversation with someone who is irrational. This is perhaps the toughest challenge for some of us. You may be looking at an adult, but you are speaking to the emotional equivalent of a ten-year-old. (In some cases, 10 is a generous estimate). Adjust your speech and mannerisms accordingly, but try not to come across as condescending. What good will it do to get angry at a child for having a tantrum? The difference with psychopaths is that you can't realistically send someone who's biologically an adult to his or her room, so you'll have to be creative about how you handle yourself in their presence.

    Under no circumstance should you argue with them; you will not win. They will always be right, and you will always be wrong. They are unwilling to listen to reason and logic. You will not get through to them, and you will only wind up frustrated. If they do let you think that you have won an argument, be wary! They want something; they are lulling you into a false sense of security. The other shoe will drop after they coerce you into doing, buying, or giving them what they want.

    A co-worker may have a harder time figuring out which buttons to push, but be especially wary of ex-lovers and family members who know you very well. If you feel yourself becoming emotionally responsive to their attempts to provoke you, try repeating a mantra in your head, even if it is simply one word such as "disconnect" or "serenity".

    3. Stay Focused

    Be Wary of Diversion Tactics
    Keep your attention on what is important. A sociopath will use elaborate hand gestures, stand too close to you, stare you down, constantly touch you, anything they can think of to distract you from catching the discrepancies and contradictory statements coming out of their mouths. They will embellish and outright lie in order to appear more intelligent, more accomplished, more interesting, more anything than they really are. They will also abruptly change the subject (or tell a series of lies) if you call them out on something. The sociopath will attack you no matter how you try to answer their demands. Watch for this.

    They will try to keep you on edge or make you feel uncomfortable. Do not allow them to overstep your personal boundaries. "No" is a complete sentence, and you don't have to disclose information that you do not want to share with them, nor are you obligated to tolerate physical contact.

    Be aware that they may tell you something personal (which may not even be true - they are, after all, compulsive liars) in order to make you feel obligated to share something personal with them. The goal is to elicit private info that they can then use to their advantage. For instance, maybe it's a secret you fear they will tell others, or perhaps it's just knowledge they can use to guilt trip you. They can use seemingly innocuous information to manipulate you in ways that you wouldn't even have thought possible, so be very careful what you divulge.

    See past the flighty hand gestures, smiles, winks, attempts to touch you, and really focus on what they are saying. Their dialogue is usually full of contradictions and faulty logic. Just like mythical vampires, emotional vampires will try to mesmerize you (and they tend to use an abnormal and intimidating amount of eye contact). You are not obligated to look them in the eye. In fact, you may find it easier to focus on their words if you close your eyes, focus on a spot on the wall, or look at another facial feature other than their eyes.

    Summary - these people if you think they are your friends, they have put in the hook.. Remove the hook and get back your personal sovereignty.

    Take your time and evaluate what you see happening. Go through the list and see if the traits are there - look at every response, every demand, every contradiction to what you know as "truth". That will give you an advantage and not be placed into a subordinate position, manipulated by the smooth talking sociopath, narcissist or psychopath.
    Last edited by Bob; 13th August 2017 at 15:34.
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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    I yawn when my cat yawns and I married a narcissist. I did not realize it until we split up 20 years later. Yes, not the sharpest tool in the box, but I did not realize some folk were made like that. I am better at being suspicious now, unfortunately.

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Quote Posted by findingneo (here)
    I yawn when my cat yawns and I married a narcissist. I did not realize it until we split up 20 years later. Yes, not the sharpest tool in the box, but I did not realize some folk were made like that. I am better at being suspicious now, unfortunately.
    That's neat When I was playing the video my cat was sitting on my lap watching the notebook screen, yawing away, and of course so was I. We had a yawning-fest for about a 1/2 hour period and then while purring, curled up under my chin giving my beard a brushing with his head. Shared empathy is great !
    Life is a long lesson in humility. ~James M. Barrie

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Tks Bob, i will test it with the psychopaths I know, yawn. When i see him (my daughter's dad)
    How to let the desire of your mind become the desire of your heart - Gurdjieff

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Quote Posted by findingneo
    I yawn when my cat yawns and I married a narcissist. I did not realize it until we split up 20 years later.
    Sometimes those who are loving and tolerant give so much, not realizing there are those who would take take take, and not be reciprocal.. 20 years could very well elicit a tear or three..

    Next the Machiavellian personality - the third of the deadly trio of manipulators..
    Life is a long lesson in humility. ~James M. Barrie

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    The answer to the thread is no, they don´t. It´s also mentioned in the amazing book:
    Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior – by Ori Brafman (Author), Rom Brafman (Author)
    One can read the first pages here on Amazon:
    https://www.amazon.com/Sway-Irresist...dp/0385530609/
    After one look at this planet any visitor would say: I want to see the Manager. - William S. Burroughs

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Oh gosh Bob. Maybe he was that word (I had to google) as well. I will have to bookmark that word. Seems like you could be onto something there. Thank you. So,next time I see him not listening. Luckily, he is no longer my problem.
    Last edited by findingneo; 16th August 2017 at 14:04.

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    My radar is finely tuned to sociopaths.

    If manipulation begins I immediately leave. If that does not work I will become extremely uncooperative, combative, and taciturn, insulting with every word and action, making sure the sociopath understands the connection: That they are my enemy and nothing they say will change that. Of course, that alienates the innocent others who kinda like the sociopath, definitely more than my grumpy self. So often I am marginalized by the encounter and have to leave anyway, which then becomes reasonable and acceptable since I first took the abuse. Either way I'm out...

    This has happened too many times to count.

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    Default Re: Do psychopaths yawn when they see another yawn?

    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    My radar is finely tuned to sociopaths.

    If manipulation begins I immediately leave. If that does not work I will become extremely uncooperative, combative, and taciturn, insulting with every word and action, making sure the sociopath understands the connection: That they are my enemy and nothing they say will change that. Of course, that alienates the innocent others who kinda like the sociopath, definitely more than my grumpy self. So often I am marginalized by the encounter and have to leave anyway, which then becomes reasonable and acceptable since I first took the abuse. Either way I'm out...

    This has happened too many times to count.
    You've described my experiences with them and the reaction of others around me exactly to a T....no win situation socially but a huge win personally.

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