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Thread: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

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    Avalon Member uzn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    The Roof











    Last edited by uzn; 26th August 2017 at 07:46.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    this Kerch tomb is important, it predates Mithradates, he just fled to Kerch after he lost his final battle to Rome, implying it was already built and he just moved into the area...the architectural style of this kurgan is similar to those found in Egypt and Peru. And since the pre-Sumerian culture Aratta is just north of Kerch, I'd guess it's part of the same pre-deluvian culture...



    The stepped entrance doorway, third picture down looks similar to the Kerch doorway, possible connection?

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Another site with similar anti-deluvian architecture is the Belevi Mauseleum, to the East of Kerch, along the coast of the Black Sea. More architecture similar to that of Egypt and Peru.


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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    There is another lost civilisation similiar to the babylonian one just a little above. Located at the Oxus and Uzboy river. For a lack of a better Name they been named the Oxus Culture.
    Their civilisation stretched from Afganistan to Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan along the rivers.



    Googlemaps:
    https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...2067187474&z=6

    What really got my attention besides the big and ancient ruins was this Picture. This was taken by photographer Kenneth Garrett.
    http://kennethgarrett.photoshelter.com (there you can download the pictures in ridiculus size)

    All these following Pictures were excavated at the Gonor Depe site.

    Look at the size of these figurines ! The grooves on the Horn are half the size of a groove of a Fingerprint. Just look at your fingertip and imagine the size. Amazing.


    Mainstream archeologist will most likely say they did it with copparchissels

    Some more artefacts from the same site:






    They also had Cylinder Seals similar to the once the sumerians used.


    Last edited by uzn; 26th August 2017 at 20:16.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Mainstream archaelogy says it´s roundabout 4000 years old.

    Turkmenistan; Gonor Depe site










    Ayaz Kala (fortress 2) of Khwarezm (Chorasmia), today desert but in ancient times green and lush. (Uzbekistan)


    Dev-kesken Kala as photographed by Soviet Archaeologist Sergey Tolstov in 1947.


    Kampyr Tepe overlooking the fertile valley of the Bactrian Oxus.


    The formidable walls surrounding the ruins of Bactra, adjacent to modern-day Balkh.


    There is a little more text about the Oxus Civilisation
    http://discovermagazine.com/2006/nov...d-turkmenistan

    There is a Oxus Tresure on display in the British Museum. Mostly Gold stuff but no miniature figurines.
    This Griffon Bracelet was filled with jewels. But greedy people came along.


    The Goldstuff in the British Museum is viewable here on Wikipedia:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxus_Treasure

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Martynivka Treasure (Ukrainian: Мартинівський скарб, Martynivsky skarb) is a hoard consisting of 116 silver items (weighing about 3.3 kg) found in 1909, in the village of Martynivka, Cherkasy Oblast, Ukraine. The treasure is currently preserved at the National Historical Museum of Ukraine in Kiev and the British Museum in London. It is dated approximately to the 6th-7th centuries AD.

    One object of this treasure looks very interesting:

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Seven headed Figure carved in Stone called the Khakassia petroglyph.
    Unfortunately, the only info I could find about it is that it has been discovered in Khakassia region, Siberia and that it is dated to 5000 BC
    (the petroglyph is also dated to 10 000 BC in other sources).





    Brahmi alphabet


    Similar figures on a Stone


    Some other seven headed images from other parts of the world


    Source:
    https://cogniarchae.wordpress.com/20...headed-figure/
    Last edited by uzn; 27th August 2017 at 09:54.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Of Course there are also a lot of Stonecircles and Megaliths (Standing Stones) in Russia. Most are found in Siberia and Mongolia.

    Some examples







    This one is called the Deer Stone










    Last edited by uzn; 29th August 2017 at 05:41.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Really, really fascinating. Thanks again.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)



    Fascinating... one body, seven "heads" or "lights"... could be a depiction of "chakras"... or seven independent "centers" controlling said "body" with one predominant, central one...

    ... or... in electrical universe's terms... the depiction of a catastrophe due to the incursion of a cometary body which exploded into seven glowing pieces...

    ... makes one wonder about what those menorah or Medusa tales are an allegory for...

    ... sorry...
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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    This subject is what I love most of all uzn, thank you so much for sharing it!

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Unraveling the Mystery of the “Armenian Stonehenge”

    By Karine Vann smithsonian.com
    July 27, 2017



    (Ozbalci / iStock)

    The misty and mountainous valleys of the south Caucasus have been host to human activity continuously for thousands of years, but only recently has the Western archaeological world had access to them.

    From the cave in which researchers found the world’s oldest shoe and the oldest winemaking facility, to traces of an Urartian city with hundreds of wine-holding vessels buried in the ground, the last four decades have witnessed extraordinary interest from scholars and tourists alike in the smallest republic in the former Soviet Union. None, however, are as quite as tantalizing as the 4.5 hectare archaeological site whose name is as contested as its mysterious origins.



    Helicopter image of Karahundj (Aryans Tours)

    Located in Armenia’s southernmost province, Zorats Karer, or as it is vernacularly known, Karahundj, is a site which has been inhabited numerous times across millennia, from prehistoric to medieval civilizations. It consists of a prehistoric mausoleum and nearby, over two hundred neighboring large stone monoliths, eighty of which have distinctive, well-polished holes bored near their upper edge.

    In recent years, to the dismay of local scientists, the monoliths have garnered the interest of the international community after some pre-emptive research emerged drawing comparisons between the astronomical implications of Zorats Karer and that of the famous Stonehenge monument in England. Many touristic outlets responded to the comparison by branding Zorats Karer colloquially as the ‘Armenian Stonehenge’ and the resulting debate between the scientific community and popular culture has been a fierce one.



    (Wikipedia)

    The first scholarly account of Zorats Karer took place in 1935 by ethnographer Stepan Lisitsian, who alleged that it once functioned as a station for holding animals. Later, in the 1950s, Marus Hasratyan discovered a set of 11th to 9th century BCE burial chambers. But the first investigation which garnered international attention to the complex was that of Soviet archaeologist Onnik Khnkikyan, who claimed in 1984 that the 223 megalithic stones in the complex may have been used, not for animal husbandry, but instead for prehistoric stargazing. He believed the holes on the stones, which are two inches in diameter and run up to twenty inches deep, may have been used as early telescopes for looking out into the distance or at the sky.
    Intrigued by the astronomical implications, the next series of investigations were conducted by an astrophysicist named Elma Parsamian from the Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, one of the main astronomy centers of the USSR. She and her colleagues observed the position of the holes according to an astronomical calendar and established that several of them aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the day of the summer solstice.



    Image of Karahundj at Sunset, from Elma Parsamian’s investigations in 1984 (Elma Parsamian)

    She is also responsible for suggesting the name Karahundj for the site, after a village 40km away by the same name. Prior to her investigations, locals referred to the site as Ghoshun Dash, which meant ‘Army of Stones’ in Turkic. Folk myth suggests the stones were erected in ancient times to commemorate soldiers killed in war. After the 1930s, locals transitioned to the Armenian translation, Zorats Karer. But Karahundj, Parsamian said, offered a more interesting name because Kar, means stone and hundj, a peculiar suffix which has no meaning in Armenian, sounds remarkably similar to the British ‘henge’. In recent years, this name has received extreme criticism from scholars and in scientific texts, the name Zorats Karer is used nearly exclusively.

    Several years later, a radiophysicist named Paris Herouni performed a series of amateur studies branching off from Parsamian’s, using telescopic methods and the precession laws of Earth. He argued that the site actually dates back to around 5500 BCE., predating its British counterpart by over four thousand years. He strongly pioneered for a direct comparison to Stonehenge and even went so far as to etymologically trace the name Stonehenge to the word Karahundj, claiming it really had Armenian origins. He was also in correspondence with the leading scholar of the Stonehenge observatory theory, Gerald Hawkins, who approved of his work. His claims were quick to catch on, and other scholars who strongly contest his finding have found them difficult to dispel.



    A figure from Herouni’s book Armenians and Old Armenia where he points out this group of stones as an astronomical tool. (Armenians and Old Armenia)

    The problem with the “Armenian Stonehenge” label, notes archaeo-astronomer Clive Ruggles in Ancient Astronomy: An Encyclopedia of Cosmologies and Myth, is that analyses that identify Stonehenge as an ancient observatory have today largely been dispelled. As a result, he says, the research drawing comparisons between the two sites is “less than helpful.”

    According to Professor Pavel Avetisyan, an archaeologist at the National Academy of Sciences in Armenia, there is no scientific dispute about the monument. “Experts have a clear understanding of the area,” he says, “and believe that it is a multi-layered [multi-use] monument, which requires long-term excavation and study.” In 2000, he helped lead a team of German researchers from University of Munich in investigating the site. In their findings, they, too, criticized the observatory hypothesis, writing, “... [A]n exact investigation of the place yields other results. [Zora Karer], located on a rocky promontory, was mainly a necropolis from the Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age. Enormous stone tombs of these periods can be found within the area.” Avetisyan's team dates the monument to no older than 2000 BCE, after Stonehenge, and also suggested the possibility that the place served as a refuge during times of war in the Hellenistic period.

    “The view that the monument is an ancient observatory or that its name is Karahundj is elementary charlatanism, and nothing else. All of that,” says Avetisian, “has nothing to do with science.”

    Unfortunately for Avetisyan, dispelling myths about Zorats Karer is difficult when so few resources exist in English to aid the curious Westerner. Richard Ney, an American who moved to Armenia in 1992, founded the Armenian Monuments Awareness Project and authored the first English-language resource to the site from 1997, has witnessed over two decades of back-and-forth. He believes Karahundj is “caught between two different branches of science with opposing views on how to derive fact. Both are credible,” he says, “and I feel both can be correct, but will never admit it.”

    Despite all the controversy and whatever you end up deciding to call it, the monument itself is stunning and located in an area of Armenia well-endowed with natural beauty, making it an attractive journey for many tourists each year. It’s even become an object of contemporary interest to young urbanites and neo-Pagans from Yerevan, who are known to celebrate certain solstices there. In many ways, Zorats Karer is a testament to the elusive nature of archaeology, and it’s perhaps the case that the mystery is–and will remain–part of its appeal.




    (Ozbalci / iStock)





    (Ozbalci / iStock)




    (Wikipedia)



    (VvoeVale / iStock)


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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    ive been lucky enough to visit that armenian stone complex site. its located near main road towards iran surrounded by stunning mountain views. nature there is very unique with one of the kind lizards lurking all over it. lots of horses all over. the site is much bigger than you might anticipate. overall i highly recommend seeing armenia as the amount of ancient structures, churches, forts & settlements carved in rock is mind boggling.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Quote Posted by uzn (here)
    Martynivka Treasure (Ukrainian: Мартинівський скарб, Martynivsky skarb) is a hoard consisting of 116 silver items (weighing about 3.3 kg) found in 1909, in the village of Martynivka, Cherkasy Oblast, Ukraine. The treasure is currently preserved at the National Historical Museum of Ukraine in Kiev and the British Museum in London. It is dated approximately to the 6th-7th centuries AD.

    One object of this treasure looks very interesting:
    Certainly looks like a figure dressed in a protective suit with helmet and gloves to me. Space traveller? What do they claim it to be?

    Quote Posted by uzn (here)
    Seven headed Figure carved in Stone called the Khakassia petroglyph.
    Unfortunately, the only info I could find about it is that it has been discovered in Khakassia region, Siberia and that it is dated to 5000 BC
    (the petroglyph is also dated to 10 000 BC in other sources).



    Looks.......Jewish??!! Wow....

    Certainly leaves me thinking......
    Last edited by jcocks; 31st August 2017 at 16:19.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    @Herve: Armenian Stoneage with Vine and Shoes. That sounds like a good place to be in these times

    Quote Posted by jcocks (here)
    Certainly looks like a figure dressed in a protective suit with helmet and gloves to me. Space traveller? What do they claim it to be?
    De usual: Either they say it´s the best the Artist could do, or it´s not getting mentioned much.



    Here is another interesting Settlement in Russia: Arkaim
    aka Swastika City aka Mandala City

    Thats how it looked when it was found:



    Arkaim is an archaeological site situated in the Southern Urals steppe, 8.2 kilometres (5.1 mi) north-to-northwest of Amurskiy, and 2.3 km (1.4 mi) south-to-southeast of Alexandronvskiy, two villages in the Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russia, just to the north from the Kazakhstani border.
    The ancient Ural fortress is called Russian Stonehenge. In addition to streets and buildings ruins scientists found remnants of the water system, metallurgic furnaces, and mines. It is also believed to be one of the strongest anomaly zones in Russia.
    The site is generally dated to the 17th century BC. Earlier dates, up to the 20th century BC, have been proposed. It was a settlement of the Sintashta-Petrovka culture. Newly found artifacts make the site itself much older; scientists agree on it being at least as old as Troy and the Egyptian pyramids; it dates back to the 4th millennium BC. It is said to be older then Stonehenge (3300 BC).



    Discovery and Excavation The site was discovered in 1987 by a team of Chelyabinsk scientists who were preparing the area to be flooded in order to create a reservoir, and examined in rescue excavations led by Gennadii Zdanovich. At first their findings were ignored by Soviet authorities, who planned to flood the site as they had flooded Sarkel earlier, but the attention attracted by news of the discovery forced the Soviet government to revoke its plans for flooding the area. It was designated a cultural reservation in 1991.

    Russia's president Vladimir Putin visited the site in 2005, meeting in person with the chief archaeologist Gennady Zdanovich. The visit received much attention from Russian media. They presented Arkaim as the "homeland of the majority of contemporary people in Asia, and, partly, Europe". Nationalists called Arkaim the "city of Russian glory" and the "most ancient Slavic-Aryan town". Zdanovich reportedly presented Arkaim to the president as a possible "national idea of Russia",[14] a new idea of civilisation which Shnirelman calls the "Russian idea". According to several analysts, Putin's visit was undoubtedly a message, and it gave credit to the interpretation of Arkaim as an Aryan cult centre.

    In order to gain publicity, the early investigators described Arkaim as "Swastika City", "Mandala City", and "the ancient capital of early Aryan civilization, as described in the Avesta and Vedas". The swastika description refers to the floor plan of the site, which (with some imagination) may appear similar to the swastika symbol, albeit with rounded arms (similar to the lauburu) attached to a central ring instead of a cross.



    Also the floorplan assembles in some way a Mandala.


    two rather ok Videos




    Since its discovery, Arkaim has attracted public and media attention in Russia, from a broad range of the population, including esoteric, New Age and pseudoscientific organizations. It is said to be the most enigmatic archaeological site within the territory of Russia, and as with many archaeological discoveries, many conflicting interpretations have been put forward.

    There are many pictures of imagined buildings how it meight have looked but that´s pretty much just speculation.

    more background about Arkaim:
    http://www.crystalinks.com/arkaim.html
    http://www.newdawnmagazine.com/artic...f-civilisation

    Last edited by uzn; 1st September 2017 at 18:48.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    Southern Siberia , Оkunev culture. Said to have been around in russia about 200 BC. The Stone Art is something I have never seen before. At closest it might be far related the the american Indians.
    There is also a figure with seven "Serpents" at his Head.















    Last edited by uzn; 2nd September 2017 at 07:31.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)











    Last edited by uzn; 2nd September 2017 at 07:29.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    The Lord's Fortress in Georgia

    Uplistsikhe, whose name translates to 'Fortress of the Lord', is an ancient rock-hewn town which played a significant role in Georgian history over a period of approximately 3,000 years.  Archaeological excavations have revealed extraordinary artifacts dating from the late Bronze Age all the way up to the late Middle Ages.

    Even Wikipedia is very vague (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uplistsikhe):
    Uplistsikhe (Georgian: უფლისციხე [upʰlistsʰixɛ]; literally, "the lord's fortress") is an ancient rock-hewn town in eastern Georgia, some 10 kilometers east of the town of Gori, Shida Kartli.
    Built on a high rocky left bank of the Mtkvari River, it contains various structures dating from the Early Iron Age to the Late Middle Ages, and is notable for the unique combination of various styles of rock-cut cultures from Anatolia and Iran, as well as the co-existence of pagan and Christian architecture.

    So they place it around 1000 BC. To me it loocks way more ancient, later used and even later built upon. Has a lot of similarities with the ancient cavehousing on the Crimean Peninsula near the Mangup Fortress. Sometimes called Feodoro or Theodoro. See second post in this Thread. But take a look yourself at the fortress of the Lord.

















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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)









    There is also a big tunnel descending in the complex.






    Last edited by uzn; 2nd September 2017 at 08:50.

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    Default Re: Ancient Russia (Megaliths, Caves, Sacred Sites etc)

    The whole Complex













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