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Thread: Staying Alcohol Free

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    Canada Avalon Member Tyy1907's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by ExomatrixTV (here)
    How would the world be if everything was the same EXCEPT Alcohol-use and Alcohol production never happened ... Image a super advanced "Time Traveling Alien Race" could arrange that "parallel reality" on Earth ... and you could have a peek ... what would we see?

    Do we have more (unique) Souls would be here on Earth making a super uplifting difference for all ... or less? ... or do you think it will create other unexpected "set-backs" ... me: I do not think so!

    cheers,
    John
    And perhaps how population numbers would be fewer? Many factors to consider with this question.

    To take that a step further, where would we be sitting if "gods from the sky" never came down and "saw the daughters of men" and interbred with them. Showing them all manner of cultural trappings (ex: alcohol), some helpful and some less so.
    Last edited by Tyy1907; 12th April 2021 at 19:42.
    "Without the human request, nothing will happen."

    "This must never be forgotten, that the human has the power to prevail."

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    United States Avalon Member thepainterdoug's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    I did a little looking into some famous drinkers./


    Vincent Van Gogh

    Dutch painter

    Van Gogh was enamored with absinthe, and it featured in many of his paintings. During much of his most productive years, Van Gogh’s diet mainly consisted of bread, coffee, alcohol, and cigarettes. Alcohol is at least partially responsible for the mental decline that led to his removal of his ear in 1888 and his suicide in 1890. Despite his alcoholism and poor mental and physical health, he was incredibly prolific during his later years, producing over 2100 pieces of art, including over 800 oil paintings, in about a decade.

    Stephen King

    American writer

    Stephen King has published over 60 books and almost 200 short stories from the 70s through today. Still, most of the late 70s and 80s went by in a haze of alcoholism for King, who wrote in his memoir On Writing that he “barely remembers writing” his 1981 novel Cujo. Despite this apparent fact, the book won numerous awards and was turned into a movie in 1983.

    Alexander the Great

    Macedonian King

    Alexander the Great was a legendary Ancient Greek general who is considered one of the greatest military commanders of all time. As his power grew, though, so did his sense of paranoia and megalomania. He considered himself to be a god, and had increasingly erratic behavior that led him to murder a close friend. Some historians attribute this behavior to alcoholism, which contributed to his untimely demise at age 32.

    Leonard Nimoy

    American actor

    Leonard Nimoy is best known for his enduring role as Mr. Spock from Star Trek. Unfortunately, the success of the show led him to drink, and what Nimoy called “unwinding” spiraled into a ritual of drinking wine, beer, or other spirits at the end of shooting every day. Eventually, he even started to sneak drinks on the set, disguised as water in a paper cup. Later, he checked himself into rehab, where he got clean.

    Betty Ford

    American First Lady

    Betty Ford, former First Lady and wife to President Gerald Ford, was an outspoken proponent of the feminist movement. Her approval ratings were much higher than her husband’s, at around 75%, and people admired her outspokenness and candor on a variety of issues. Still, she battled all along with an addiction to alcohol and painkillers. After a 1978 intervention she went into treatment, going on to establish the Betty Ford Center, a rehabilitation clinic, four years later.

    Buzz Aldrin

    American astronaut

    Buzz Aldrin was the second person to walk on the moon. Upon his return to earth, with seemingly little left to accomplish in life, his life deteriorated. Under the weight of depression and alcoholism, his marriage fell apart, and he withdrew from friends and family. He recounted the experience in his 2009 memoir Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon.

    Ernest Hemingway

    American writer

    Ernest Hemingway published many works of fiction that are considered classics today. He received a number of serious injuries in WWII and later in a series of plane crashes that left him in chronic pain. He drank heavily to escape the pain, once declaring that “a man does not exist until he is drunk.”

    Elizabeth Taylor

    American actress

    One of the most famous classic Hollywood stars, Elizabeth Taylor spent over three decades of her career addicted to alcohol and painkillers. She became the first celebrity to openly admit herself to rehab at the Betty Ford Center in 1983.

    Ulysses S. Grant

    American president

    As a Union general, Ulysses S. Grant was nearly constantly intoxicated, drinking from a large barrel of whiskey he kept stowed in his tent during the Civil War. Still, he led the North to victory and went on to become the 18th president of the United States.

    Samuel L. Jackson

    American actor

    Samuel L. Jackson is a highly successful actor, having appeared in over a hundred films, and is currently the second highest-grossing actor of all time. During most of his early career as a stage actor, he was under the influence of drugs and alcohol. His first role upon completing rehab was as a cocaine addict in Jungle Fever, the film that launched his cinematic career.

    WARNING SIGNS: HOW TO IDENTIFY A HIGH-FUNCTIONING ALCOHOLIC
    Just because someone is able to function at work or in life despite their dependence on alcohol does not mean that they are immune to its effects. Here are some signs that could indicate someone is a high-functioning alcoholic:

    They need alcohol to feel confident.

    Often high-functioning alcoholics feel “locked in” to their drinking because they worry that when the alcohol stops, so will their success.

    “I used to think that drinking would help my shyness, but all it did was exaggerate all the negative qualities. The drinking and the pills just sort of dulled my natural enthusiasm.” –Elizabeth Taylor

    They joke that they have an alcohol problem.

    They don’t take their alcohol dependence seriously or believe that they still have complete control on it.

    “Do you drink?” “Of course, I just said I was a writer.” –Stephen King

    They don’t seem to get hangovers anymore.

    Developing a tolerance for alcohol can, in turn, convince them that their drinking is not a problem because they are not feeling its effects.

    “Because I could handle my drinking – or so I thought – and could consume a lot of alcohol without becoming uncontrollably inebriated, I refused to see it as a problem.” –Buzz Aldrin

    They drink alone.

    Drinking is not a social activity for them; it is a solitary pastime.

    “I like to drink alone. I never get ugly when I drink too much, I never bore myself with a lot of dull conversation, and I have never yet invited myself to step outside.” –Stephen King

    They replace meals with alcohol.

    Mealtimes are often an excuse for the high-functioning alcoholic to start drinking. They may even forego food altogether.

    “I would as soon not eat at night as not to have red wine and water.” –Ernest Hemingway

    They become a different person when they drink.

    Social drinkers do not dramatically change their personality when they drink. Alcoholics, however, behave quite uncharacteristically.

    “The minute we finished the last shot I would have a drink. Then it became a series of drinks, little by little. Before I knew it I was drinking more and more because my addictive personality was taking over.” –Leonard Nimoy

    They become hostile or argumentative when they can’t drink.

    Alcoholics often suffer withdrawal symptoms if they are forced to stay sober or are cut off from their alcohol supply.

    “I knew I was an alcoholic because I was preoccupied with whether alcohol was going to be served or not.” –Betty Ford

    They can’t stop at one drink.

    They have trouble letting alcohol “go to waste” and may finish friends’ drinks for them. They have trouble setting a limit on their drinking.

    “I ain’t the kind of guy who can have one drink. I never could. That’s what I have to remember. I never had one drink in my whole life.” –Samuel L. Jackson

    They hide their alcohol.

    They keep their alcohol stashed in a secret location where their friends and family won’t find it, like in their desk or car.

    “I left his office, went around the corner, and at the first liquor store I found, I bought a bottle of Scotch. I couldn’t even wait until I got home. I swilled several swigs before pulling out of the parking lot.” –Buzz Aldrin

    They black out regularly.

    It isn’t unusual for them to be unable to recall what happened while they were drinking.

    “The turning point came when my family found me passed out on the kitchen floor. I guess I wanted to get caught.” –Samuel L. Jackson

    Recognize these warning signs in yourself or a loved one? Reach out for help. It’s not too late.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    This from Dr. Mercola:

    Liver Damage is Off the Charts

    https://articles.mercola.com/sites/a...r-disease.aspx

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    Scotland Avalon Member greybeard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Basically some live to drink -- an alcoholic has no choice --drink to live (exist)
    Delirium tremors are not a place to go -- a drink postpones that.
    Fortunately I am talking from long past experience.

    If a person wants to say free of alcohol and is not addicted -- a good way is to say "I wont have one just now"
    Works as an aid to stop smoking.
    If addicted profession help is required -- will power not enough.
    AA worked for me.

    Chris
    Be kind to all life, including your own, no matter what!!

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    Avalon Member Hym's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Don't drink now and haven't since the early 80's and then it wasn't much. It never appealed to me. Never liked any of the tastes and it was highly unnatural to get drunk. Just too busy and relaxed to numb any of this life. That and a family of alcoholics, and protecting sisters from abuse, failing at protecting them from themselves, precluded this soul from even liking the stuff. Quite the opposite, though not critical of those who didn't overindulge.

    When trying out alternatives it's best to just focus on and ENJOY nutritious foods and the endless variety of drinks, as most alternatives are just not good. I wonder how many people enjoy plain, clear and clean water. I do.

    There seem to be alternative drink mixes that are developed by completely clueless makers. One such drink alternative is made from botanicals, which on their own are harmless and are used to mimic the tastes of various hard liquors.

    However the ph of many alt. drinks is very acidic, at 3.6 pH, and they are made from a host of toxic ingredients that are unhealthy for anyone, and likely toxic for those with drinking problems.

    One of the common ingredients is sodium benzoate, a preservative that turns into the toxic substance called benzene when it is digested. That's killer on the liver.

    The other ingredients are mainly sugar, citric acid and other preservatives.
    Whoever invents those brands is completely oblivious to the fact that alcoholics are almost all diabetic or pre-diabetic.



    I lost many relatives to alcohol, close ones. Some of those losses are still living. Upon his mother's death from alcoholism, and other hospital induced sicknesses, my young son and I went to AdultChildren(of)Alcoholics. It was a beginning for him, besides a lack of focus on real healing and an excess of misplaced blame, we found it completely left out the effects of nutrition upon healing the addicted body and mind. It's criminal that any program leaves out nutrition.

    Some ACA teachers are better than others, but at least that was a starting point for a young man trying to figure out the reasons for a mother, a parent, abandoning him, during and after such a long, tortuous period of very unhealthy living. I do support those parents who have the courage to stay away from their children when they are under the inebriated and sober influences of alcoholism. It's not living when a child goes thru a parent's addictions. I went thru it with siblings, parents, uncles and aunts, made worse when some committed suicide.

    On a very positive note, I remember well, seeing a distant aunt and uncle when I was young and all I remember of them was that they were alcoholics, wine being their poison. I saw them 25 years later and I didn't even recognize them. They had completely stopped drinking some 23 years before, 2 years after I saw them last. Tho much older, they were the healthiest and most engaging couple I had ever met. I had thought that they would have been long gone by that time. Healing finds itself when people want to live a full life. That was a joyful meeting!

    The co-founder of AA, Bill Wilson, swore on and deeply benefitted from a concentration upon nutrition and it's effects on willpower and healing. He basically co-wrote the book "The Vitamin Cure for Alcoholism" with Dr. Abram Hofer.

    In the book he took this brilliant doctor's dedicated, clinical use of Vitamin C, at 3 to 5 grams, and up to 20 grams, a day along with Niacinamide/B3 (buffered Niacin), which he showed had a 70% recovery rate for schizophrenia (in 20 years of clinical use) and applied it to recovery. Dr. Hofer, the creator of the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, author of 600 studies and 30 books, and Bill W. share with the reader the battles they went thru getting the nutritional treatments recognized in recovery programs worldwide. There is much room left to include healthy living habits, in every program and in every book available.

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    United States Avalon Member Strat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    I'm in pretty good shape for my age, and although there are many contributing factors to that I'm sure that being alcohol-free for 30 years has been a part of that.
    100%. My best friends family are Irish, they drink and smoke (pot). The father doesn't drink or smoke and he has aged very well, even his hair retained its color. He looks much younger than his wife. My friends cousin came over and remarked on this, "Damn, you aged well!"

    In my opinion, alcohol is the worst drug in existence. It's socially acceptable and mandatory, it's easily accessible. If you want to get with absurdly beautiful women then you damn well better drink shots at the bar. If you want to have friends who are at the top of the social ladder then you damn well better drink.

    I love alcohol and I hate it more than anything in this world. It's my one true love and my sole enemy. It has provided me with girls way more beautiful than anyone you'll see in the movies and it has sent me to the hospital. It has ushered me into parties and has had the cops rub shoulders with me. It's going to put me down before I see 40. I do have a plan to kick it, but I hope I can kick it before it kicks me.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    I don't know if there are any steadfast answers, Strat. Assuming that there are solutions all on their own that give a different life without booze, may be missing the mark. I look at the lives of those who have succeeded and I see it as choosing a better life, a life without the self-trained guilt and an acceptance of seeing the many things that give longevity as engaging, interesting, and rewarding on a daily basis...instead of being a drag.

    Whatever it is in you that gives you that connection to women and friends is not bound by alcohol. Agreed, that some hookups will be gone without booze, but what is their value without it. Even if getting together is cool for both people the mornings after, is that just an agreed upon denial that longer lasting connections aren't worth the hassle, instead of holding on to discovering the value of longer term relationships. Boy, waiting for the women and friends you get drunk with to slowly get healthier and drink less is a losing call.

    I do see the social atmosphere in many places changing to accept and encourage healthier living, but hanging around the same haunts waiting for that new acceptance to arrive is another lost cause. At some point asserting your calm right to soberly, even tea-totallingly, engage with women and friends, women friends included, either makes an impact on the scene or you accept defeat at this young age. Whenever it is in the affirmative, it is always better.

    That juice that runs inside of us when we are connecting is even more enjoyable when we are more sober. I say more sober because assuming that alcohol free living is the true definition of sobriety is proof that you are clueless.

    We are always under some sort of influence, even if we simply view the brain as a chemical organism. Claiming sobriety makes no sense, when we view consciousness and being in different states of connecting to all that living in this busy world gives us. That's why blaming a buffer to deal with the excesses that life throws at us misses the point. It's most often not the booze. It's the overload that's the cause.

    Yep, some drink out of boredom.....No advice to offer there. That's life in a world way over stimulated on so many levels, yet almost completely ungrounded and undernourished from the primal needs that only being in nature can provide.

    When we look at cravings as a very physical calling and a nutritional need for missing nutrients bodywide, often mistaken as a need or desire to drink, it's easier to find solutions that have no downside.

    At some point drinking seems to be an habitual laziness, waiting for that look in the mirror confirming that your appearance and health is going downhill, at which point you take the steps to treat yourself better and get used to accepting the good feelings that it all brings, something I see as a challenge to some people, or resigning yourself to limitless self abuse and jumping off giving a F**k about yourself.


    What's the price and reward of different stages of sobriety........living. Whatever that means to you, it is always better. Challenges are easier to face and easier to experience. They become something different.

    Believe it or not it is a very fearful thing to many people to have more sensory awareness, more connection, more feeling, more subtlety in personal connections than they are used to when being drunk. I can say it is a much easier experience to have when we're more sober.

    Every body can handle it. We are all built for it. And there are many ways to zone out that are better than killing brain cells and kicking your liver's ass....

    That's what meditation is made for, amongst other things....getting us out of our heads and back into our bodies, even if we have to travel a bit beyond both.

    I just remembered something long past...

    I met a seer who, not knowing me or me knowing her, advised me to tell the person in my life who was losing herself in alcoholism to take up working in clay, making pottery and grounding herself by also releasing her pent up creativity in the many healing and self affirming activities that art gives.

    It for sure is a grounding activity, but I can see that there are some powerful trace minerals in some clays that make up for the missing minerals lost when the body uses them up protecting itself from the ravages of drinking. It would have been worth trying the insight out, but even after I told her, she never followed the intuitive advice.
    Last edited by Hym; 25th April 2021 at 18:49.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Good for you Man, have been drink free now for almost 6 years (couple weeks). My Irish ancestors are probably not to impressed, hehehehe.
    In any case, was puking into a drain and realized that I was done drinking, not to different from story OP I guess (well on that part of story).
    "Respect Him, Breath of Life". "-AMN-"

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    This week I learned of the death of a lovely woman who had been a functioning alcoholic for many years now. The end, when it came, was a bad one. Emaciated, drinking massive amounts, falling out with friends, lies deception etc. All will be familiar to anyone that's lived or had close acquaintance with a sufferer from alcoholism. It seldom ends well.

    When she died her fridge was empty bar some old rotten milk. No food was as important as feeding the hunger for the next drink. This then is such a key point:

    Quote Posted by Hym (here)
    I lost many relatives to alcohol, close ones. Some of those losses are still living. Upon his mother's death from alcoholism, and other hospital induced sicknesses, my young son and I went to AdultChildren(of)Alcoholics. It was a beginning for him, besides a lack of focus on real healing and an excess of misplaced blame, we found it completely left out the effects of nutrition upon healing the addicted body and mind. It's criminal that any program leaves out nutrition.
    I haven't drunk for about 6 or so years. I don't know the precise date because it wasn't something that I made a big, life changing decision about, I cut down till I wasn't drinking and then I never started again. I don't say that I'll never have another drink, but I don't plan to. I did drink more than my share for a few years before that though and it was a big part of my life. I wasn't an alcoholic, but I ticked a few of the boxes with binge drinking to excess, a glass of wine or two with a meal when alone, drinking more than planned etc. I came to drinking a little too early I think and although much of our generation had similar habits I recognised enough of the traits and the habits in those alcohol problem lists as well as knowing my own family history to first reduce and finally eliminate it as a part of everyday life. Some people I think are best leaving it aside completely and I suspect I'm one of those people.

    I do miss the taste of a good wine or a nice beer on a hot day, and the social aspect of being out with a group at the pub on a 'session' but on the whole I think I'm better without it. That hasn't turned me into a puritan on the subject. I enjoy being out with others when they're enjoying themselves, although there does come a point when the anecdotes aren't as funny for the non drinker and driving everyone home they're not as witty as they think they are

    The main driver for me in reducing alcohol however was a newfound awareness of nutrition. I had to eliminate foods and drinks from my diet and when doing so I realised the connection they had with mood and other aspects of health. One book which made a big impact on me was Potatoes not Prozac: https://radiantrecovery.com/ Kathleen DesMaisons made the connection between alcoholism and sugar addiction and I think there's a lot of truth in this. The same opioid transmitters are activated, the blood sugar spike and crash can trigger addictive behaviour, the depletion of nutrients leaves one not only hungover the next day but also craving the emotional and physical 'boost' of another drink. As we learn more about gut dysbiosis and physical and mental health I think our opinions on alcohol as a society will start to change. That's already happening in the new generation who are drinking less I think than we did and seem to have a more responsible attitude to it.

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    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    We often hear about all the lives alcohol has ruined, but one thing you never hear about are all the lives that alcohol has saved.

    Artists, broken people - they often require something like alcohol to remind them who they are underneath all their stressors - even if it's just for a few moments - and having been reminded they have the inspiration to carry on for another day. Alcohol is not called "spirits" for nothing. It often does things for a broken spirit and mind that no beverage on earth can do. The not so easy trick is maintaining discipline and respect for, say, a 3 drink limit perhaps. Everyone is different in their response to alcohol, so everyone's limit will be different.

    I respect anyone who chooses to abstain, for whatever reason, but it's inaccurate to say that all alcohol is bad for all people all the time.

    To begin, alcoholic beverages aren't all the same. Far from it. Saying that is like saying all aliens are evil. If we just take wines, for instance, there are numerous varieties, and within those varieties numerous factors that make each batch unique - location of the grapes, time of year they were grown, how they were tended to, and so on.

    In my early 20's I drank alot of crap - Budweiser, Miller etc, and I truly suffered for it. But when I discovered Guinness, for example, it actually enhanced my life. There's an alchemy created by all the ingredients in a magical brew like that, one that makes the whole much larger than it's parts; but even the parts of Guinness look good on paper: loads of B vitamins, iron, fiber, silicon, prebiotics etc.

    One of my literary hero's, Bukowski, said he would have killed himself early on in life were it not for alcohol. Hemingway said something similar. I'm sure that sentiment applies to many creative sorts. It's true that overindulgence has killed many an artist, but they may never have created anything in the first place without alcohol. Very few people think like that, and I find it a little surprising.

    The right alcoholic beverage for the right person, at the right time (you have to work a little to find your drink) can be your salvation. It's a blessing for people who are broken. Alcohol is the result of fermentation, a very natural process. Yes, too much of it and one loses oneself. But at the right amount, one can find oneself. It should be used consciously and ritualistically, not clumsily. If you have the discipline to do that, it can be a powerful tool. To run from that powerful tool can be a foolish thing to do

    One thing to keep in mind is that all substances that heal are toxic at excessive doses, even water. Even more important than the substances themselves is how we choose to use them. If alcohol just disagrees with you violently, or if you cannot control your intake, I would strongly suggest avoiding it. But for everyone else, I would strongly encourage exploring it

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    One thing I didn’t mention in my initial post on this thread is the primary reason I quit drinking: the amount of suffering I was causing other people via what I said and did while intoxicated. At the peak of my drinking, I was embracing nihilism-and nihilist I was, not caring about any consequences at all, least of all destroyed relationships. Also what I call FNS (Fermented Narcissicism Syndrome) is another reason I quit. It is difficult for sober people to hang out with drunks who tend to masturbate their subjectivity and only talk about themselves, then repeat what they say after approximately 10 minutes.

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    United States Avalon Member Strat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    We often hear about all the lives alcohol has ruined, but one thing you never hear about are all the lives that alcohol has saved.
    I think this is due to the ratio of saved lives to ruined lives.

    I hear you about the artists and all, but I don't think it was the drug that caused them to be artistic. I think crazy people make art and crazy people do drugs because they are often self medicating.

    I do believe that some drugs influence the artistic process, but I don't think doing drugs = quality art.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Fantastic thread for a subject I'm VERY close to. I come from a long line of alcoholism...both grandparents on both sides of my family...down to both my parents....down to both my sister and myself. I drank like a fish during my teens...and ended up quitting drinking in August of 1989. I have not had a drop of alcohol since that date. That being said, I do miss the taste of beer, but the monkey has long been off my back.

    Alcoholism is hereditary within family genes. It can cause sooooo much destruction to the human condition. When one quits drinking, they must realize it is a life decision and not to be taken lightly.

    After saying all that...I am not completely substance free, as I do enjoy my herb (I've been partaking in quality marijuana on a daily basis for as long as I've quit drinking. There may be some detrimental effects of smoking weed....but not nearly the extent of alcohol. Also, I use a vaporizer as apposed to smoking joints / pipes....only getting pure THC and not all the other bad stuff. I can function stoned...I could not function drunk (believe me, I tried).

    Life decision!!

    Dave - Toronto

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Revisiting this post here. I guess I can say this cause I manage all, but dont be too hard on yourself. forgive yourself ! forgive yourself for being human, a spirit cemented into a body in a 3 d unnatural world. You have so little control over it all that you dont even know who or what makes your heart beat.

    you go to sleep and voluntary systems carry you thru the night, to find yourself awake again. how did you get there? you? nope.

    If your waking day is resisting something, then it runs you. sometime you just need to eat so much chocolate, junk food, drink booze whatever, to learn by excess.
    resistance causes persistance.

    you need to discover the deeper problem. the thing thats hiding , making you believe one thing over the other.

    i drink cause life is boring and repetitive. and when I drink , I forget that it is. But it never ever effects my true purpose and life participation.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by Strat (here)
    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    We often hear about all the lives alcohol has ruined, but one thing you never hear about are all the lives that alcohol has saved.
    I think this is due to the ratio of saved lives to ruined lives.

    I hear you about the artists and all, but I don't think it was the drug that caused them to be artistic. I think crazy people make art and crazy people do drugs because they are often self medicating.

    I do believe that some drugs influence the artistic process, but I don't think doing drugs = quality art.


    Have you ever listened to Sergeant Pepper? If music was like athletics, we'd have to put an asterisk next to that album to indicate performance enhancing drugs LOL

    But yeah I know what ya mean. Good artists are generally good artists, and bad artists are bad artists, with or without drugs. But sometimes drugs make good artists even better artists. You're playing with fire sometimes, but the question becomes: what kind of risks are you willing to take to reach new heights?

    But forget artists, I'm mostly thinking about everyday, average people. Broken people living broken lives. Becoming an alcoholic is hardly a solution to that situation, but some alcohol might be required simply to endure. It's like if you're hemorrhaging blood - you have to stop the bleeding first before you ultimately heal. Alcohol, used appropriately, can stop the bleeding sometimes..metaphorically speaking. It can sustain hope when you've just got nothing left. It's done that for me anyway. I honestly can't say whether I'd still be around without alcohol. Yes, it's damaged me in some ways, but it's also saved me in others.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Go to a Welsh bar where the beer and whisky is flying and ask for a tall, cold glass of YAK MILK. If the tender does not miss a beat and turns to make it for you, make sure that he/she is constantly in your signt so that when your order comes you may risk to barely taste it. When he/she lets out a string of curses in the Welsh language, at least you will not understand it. You might also find yourself having a YAK MILK Shampoo!

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    But forget artists, I'm mostly thinking about everyday, average people. Broken people living broken lives. Becoming an alcoholic is hardly a solution to that situation, but some alcohol might be required simply to endure. It's like if you're hemorrhaging blood - you have to stop the bleeding first before you ultimately heal. Alcohol, used appropriately, can stop the bleeding sometimes..metaphorically speaking. It can sustain hope when you've just got nothing left. It's done that for me anyway. I honestly can't say whether I'd still be around without alcohol. Yes, it's damaged me in some ways, but it's also saved me in others.
    Like the US founders viewed fire (government), a dangerous servant.
    Last edited by Gracy May; 25th April 2021 at 23:24.
    If you trust your government
    You don't know history

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    One thing I forgot to mention in my initial post was when in 1986 I had a video artist document me getting drunk. I wanted to see what I looked like on the cusp of blacking out. I put on a performance of a lifetime. But she got scared, packed up her gear and split.
    The next day with one of the worst hangovers that I ever had, she played the tape. I was horrified because I looked exactly like my father. The way he slumped his shoulders, held the drink and enunciated his words. I was able to quit for one year after that, then for good in 1989. It's a highly recommended technique for those of you who are looking to quit and want to see yourself as others see you when you are drinking.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    That's a very healthy look at yourself Jaye B. Healing.

    If more people saw themselves drunk they'd get a real look at how they see themselves under the influence, as you did yourself, and not just as others see them.

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    Default Re: Staying Alcohol Free

    Quote Posted by Mike (here)
    One of my literary hero's, Bukowski, said he would have killed himself early on in life were it not for alcohol. Hemingway said something similar.
    And then Hemingway did kill himself.....

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