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Thread: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

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    Default Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c 1150 AD.

    These abbreviated passages are taken from El Imperio Vikingo de Tihuanacu (America before Columbus), Ediciones de la Casa de Tharsis, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 2013, p.88 to 105, reprinted from the original of 1978.

    "Towards the end of the 12th century the Atlantic held no other interest for the Vikings in South America than being a way enabling them to re-establish contact with Europe. The best port for such a voyage would have been in the delta of the Amazon. There is no trace of one having been there unless it was used by the Portuguese colonizers as the foundation for their port at Bélem. Ports generally remain in the same places during the course of history.

    "What testifies to the Viking presence in that region are the countless bits and pieces of ceramic disinterred on the great island of Marajó, some with runic symbols or crosses of Malta. The island, as large as Denmark, does not flood and is not suitable as a maritime base, but was useful as a transit stopover.

    "On the north-east coast of Brazil between the Amazon and Cape San Roque the Vikings had a chain of ports each 300 to 500 kilometres apart with safe anchorages as in the home fjords and equipped with boat repair yards. The chain continued farther south along the coast to Santa Catarina.

    "If one day a Viking boat would put to sea for Europe, it was guaranteed that its destination would be Dieppe in Normandy, opposite from where the ancestors sailed in 987 AD from the Danelaw. Many things would have changed over the intervening two centuries. The Danes had been thrown out by the Anglo-Saxons, but in 1066 the Normans had captured the region under Norman the Conqueror, Duke of Rouen.

    "Paradoxically then, the Vikings of Tiahuanacu would find themselves in a known country. Certainly by now the Normans would speak only French but the people would use a patois of Danish and Anglo-Saxon probably not much different from the Schleswig dialect spoken by recent Viking arrivals in Brazil. Both England and Normandy had the same king and so the Viking boat would have headed for the Norman coast closest to the English coast, and a port which would be maintaining links to Denmark with no shortage of interpreters. We know that it arrived for the following reasons.

    "The Vikings of coastal South America had no reason to hide their knowledge from their European cousins, and so they allowed the authorities at Dieppe to copy their famed map of the South American coasts. They also spoke of the riches in gold, silver and timber to be found in the immense Viking Empire.

    "In the 12th century, the Knights Templar Order was all powerful, having developed surprisingly rapidly. In less than a century it had funded a large number of immense cathdrals and churches. Where was the money coming from next? Roman coins had now been used up, the crusaders brought some silver coins from Palestine where they had more value than gold, but not much. There was no silver mine in operation in Europe. Those in Germany were not yet open, those in Russia as yet unknown. The small quantity of silver that the Templars were managing to mint was a "Secret of the Temple" and came from North America.

    End of Page 1.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Page 2

    A few kilometres south of Dieppe at Saint-Valery-en-Caux, the Temple had a port of special importance used for a large part of their communications with Britain. Around the year 1150 AD, news came of an unexpected arrival there, the crew being strangely attired. The Templars investigated without much enthusiasm, thinking they would probably have come from Byzantium or some such place in the "New World". But here was something completely out of the blue. They were being visited by a Viking chieftain from South America.

    The Templar fleet was better prepared than simple fishermen to exploit the information received from the other side of the Atlantic. Soon the shipbuilders of Dieppe were ready to engage in commerce with South America, and they took care to ensure that no word slipped out that they were going there in search of precious metals. They announced instead that they would be importing brazilwood, not known by that name at the time but probably under the Muslim term "baqqam", a commodity of no interest for their neighbours.

    The Temple set up the port of La Rochelle to handle the organization. (Since modern historians are not allowed to believe in any Europeans being in South America prior to Columbus, the purpose behind the development of La Rochelle continues to puzzle historians to the present day. Amongst seals of the Secretum Templi seized by the French king in 1307 and discovered recently was one which depicts a characteristic Amerindian.)

    The contact established at Dieppe with the Templars allows us to fix the approximate date for the Viking voyage. Work on building the first Gothic churches began around 1140 AD, and twenty years later, once funds became available, on the first cathedrals. Founded in 1128 the Order required several decades to establish its principal command houses, including that at Saint-Valery-en-Caux, and more years yet were still needed before they could set off for South America to begin the exploitation of minerals there, and in particular silver. Therefore it will have been around 1150 that the Tiahuanacu boat arrived at Normandy.

    The most important silver mines in South America were to be found in the area of Porco on the eastern slopes of the Bolivian Andes, operated by the Incas using the most primitive methods of smelting. This area, later called Sierra de la Plata by the Spaniards, was not far from the uplands of Potosí where incalculably rich veins of silver ore would be found in the 16th century. Since the industrial production of silver for export was called for, probably the Temple sent a ship with the first mining engineers and technicians to escort the Viking chieftain on his return voyage. Such personnel would have been extremely difficult to find in France where there were no silver mines. It appears that the recruitment of miners and smelters was carried out in Germany, these being brought to Les Charbonnieres in the Tolosa region under the pretext of rehabilitating an ancient Roman mine, depleted and abandoned for centuries. There the specialists were selected for Peru and separated off under strict security. A local training foundry was set up near the command houses of La Coune Sourdre and Ermitage to work a metal of mysterious origin. This set-up would last for 150 years protected by an impregnable fortress which rose up along the Templar road from Portugal.

    In South America soon the first galleries would be opened at Porco in Bolivia and the ore begin to mount up in the mine entrances. Probably using herdes of llamas, caravans of Indians began transporting along the northern Peaviru - permanent soft road - large quantities of ore or partially refined metal whose immediate destination was Cerro Corá in Paraguay. Here, 32 kilometres from the modern town of Pedro Juan Caballero, there rose up the Itaguambypé - Guarani word for fortress - which dominated the road at a point of vital importance. This was a hollowed out low mountain protected by sheer sides of masonry, blocks of stone slotted together in the anti-earthquake style of Tiahuanacu. The effective length of this mountain is 300 metres by ten high and three wide. Along its crest runs a path at the centre of which is the narrow entrance. The ruins of a lookout post can be found at one end.

    Nearby is a stream, Aquidaban-Nigui. Its course is interrupted by a small waterfall at the side of which are the ruins of a building 16.80 metres in length. Here the Templars built their foundry. A mould found amongst the fallen blocks of stone which formed its walls leaves no doubt as to its purpose. From this mould came ingots of silver all identical as to form just as are those to be found in our banks nowadays.

    Some twenty kilometres from the foundry within the crest of the ridge Cerro Kysé, near a sacred wood of Nordic type and a mount, Yvyty Pero, there is an enormous subterranean cavity, to which it has remained impossible to gain access, which appears to be a Viking necropolis. One can make out chiselled into the stone amongst runic characters a number of esoteric symbols of Templar origin. There are no silver mines in Paraguay and the Guarani Indians did not know how to mine and work metals. (If a single Viking skeleton were to be found here and upon analysis carbon dated by DNA to the 13th century, the Columbus myth would be exposed to all academic historians at last and for ever.)

    Converted into ingots, permanent units easy to audit, the silver - and possibly gold too, though in much smaller quantities - would be taken from here to the Atlantic for loading aboard Templar ships for Europe.

    End of Page 2

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    A real huge Thank You for this. The entire thing is just way more than fascinating.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    The scope of this operation is remarkable, such that when the position was marked on the map in the earlier thread my mind boggled as to how they could possibly have pulled it off. I found myself thinking of 'Fitzcarraldo' and 'Aguirre' where the scale and challenge of the landscape is so apparent and thinking of what resources the Vikings would've had. Professor de Maheiu's account however helps to make it seem very possible, if still a great feat in itself. Looking at the Templars works in Europe at around this time, they are impressive. They were clearly people of great skills and resourcefulness and if this account is true, they could keep a secret....Which brings up another interesting facet of this. Was this history subsequently suppressed by those that turned on the Templars?

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Page 3

    After a while a difficult situation developed. Either the Templars abused the hospitality of the Incas in their metropolitan territory, or disturbances had occurred there or along the routes of transportation and the Vikings considered it prudent to restrict Templar activities to a less strategic region. But the most likely reason must be that a 5,400-kilometre round trip to the loading port became too much of a burden.

    The result was that new silver deposits were discovered some 800 kilometres south of the Amazon in what is now the State of Piauí, which crosses the Parnaiba at its mouth, where there is an excellent port. Nowadays this is the most poverty-stricken area of Brazil. The population, many of mixed race with golden-blond hair, live off their goats and mandioca. But it was not always like that.

    When the Portuguese arrived there in the second half of the 17th century they discovered a large number of depleted mines, particularly in the Serra do Sumidouro. Even today one can find numerous open galleries in silver-bearing rocks. Probably the deposits were shown to the Vikings by the Guaranis whom they had established at the coast, In that marginal zone of the empire, the presence of the Templars did not offer the same dangers as it did in the Andes, and it was merely sufficient to install here a military colony to keep order.

    The Piauí mines were nothing like so rich as Porco in the Sierra de la Plata had been. They became quickly depleted. However, in the south of the region was a gigantic lagoon, consisting of swamps and lakes, which filled up during the winter, and from which uplands reach to 300 metres above sea level and contain enormous silver deposits. The Opala, a navigable river from the south, crosses it and runs down to the ocean. Here we find the port of San Francisco where even today one can see large boats whose shape and manner of construction and prow clearly originated from the Viking drakkars.

    Another river leaves the Opala and flows down to Piauí, a tributary of the Parnaiba. This is navegable in the rainy season, during which it was the only way possible to transport by river the production from the mines of the Great Lagoon. The Guaranis of the region said that in order to exploit these deposits all year it was necessary to drain the Upa-Assu. All that was needed was to lower the threshold of the spillage where the Opala originated.

    Templars and Vikings undertook the task and soon five symmetrical canals concentrated their waters into the same quadrangular cavity 50 metres deep cut into the living stone. In a short time nothing remained of the Great Lagoon than the general course to San Francisco, a permanent route connecting an exceptionally rich silver mining zone and the Atlantic, where another port was built at Piagabuga or Panado.

    Not only the Upa-Assu silver mines were connected to the ocean by the newly created river but the modern day State of Minas Gerais, which crosses the south of the old Great Lagoon. Not only did the Portuguese discover in the 16th century innumerable pre-Columbian mines but also a tribe whose men wore beards and had a clear skin: the women of these Molomaques were "white like Englishwomen, with golden, silver or brown beautiful silky hair, delicate features and small hands and feet."

    For almost 150 years Templar ships came to Santos at the mouth of the Parnaiba and at San Francisco to fetch the silver of the South American mines, the existence of which had been revealed to them by the Vikings who then collaborated in whatever work was necessary to harvest it. What was the quid pro quo?

    The Templars could offer sumptuous articles possibly, clothing and wines, materials of warfare. Cattle and horses do not feature, for to judge by the race of those animals depicted in the runic inscriptions at Cerro Guazu in Paraguay, it was the Normans who from 1250 AD used them for the carriage of brazilwood. Everything that can be imagined comes nowhere near a fair exchange. So there had to be something else which the Templars could do and the Vikings could not, and this will be shown in page 4 to follow.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Page 4, FinalPage

    When the Nordics undertook the exploitation of the mines near Parnaiba, at a distance of 130 kilometres as the bird flies they discovered an area of great rocks which had been shaped into strange forms by many centuries of erosion. Nowadays it is known to tourists as Siete Ciudades, but it reminded the Vikings of the Externsteine of the Teutoburg Forest in Lower Saxony, the most celebrated cult centre of ancient Germania, the existence of which the Vikings knew by tradition.

    Immediately they made it into a centre of Nordic pilgramage for celebrating their religious ceremonies. This was the work of conversion to be undertaken by Templar masons and sculptors to repay Viking assistance in the exploitation of silver. Drakkars, trees of life crowned with eagles' nests which in Germanic mythology symbolize Valhalla: the hammer of Thor, a siren and so on, these are examples confirming beyond doubt what the runic inscriptions imply. It seemed to the Vikings that the Sacred Rocks of Siete Ciudades had been put there by the gods: an Externsteine on the imperial scale to allow them to regain in all its purity the cult of Odin and Thor. It was thanks to this megalithic complex that the north-east of Brazil was transformed into a prosperous colony whose importance justified later the enormous effort demanded in emptying the Upa-Assu.

    The mines of the cordillera and north-east of Brazil were being worked to the maximum, Norman vessels had begun to ship out brazilwood from the mouth of the Amazon as is confirmed in the Customs registers of Caen and Honfleur. Author de Mahieu calculates that the number of Vikings was around 150,000 concentrated in towns, military colonies and spread across South America.

    Unfortunately, Templar chaplains arrived on missions of evangelization to the natives. This brutal christianization began to interfere in the customs of the people and may have lit the initial fuze which ultimately led to the terrible revolution beginning in about 1277 AD. Many pages are devoted to it in de Mahieu's account.

    Sufficient to say that the revolt achieved its aim of conquering Tiahuanacu. The surviving Vikings there took to the Isla del Sol where they were surrounded and wiped out. The white males died with their throats cut. The revolt extended over all the territory. The military colonies whose members were mainly Incas or "descendants" were spared. Isolated at the centre of the Indians the local lords and chieftains were at their mercy from the moment when their central power dissolved. Some with loyal subjects managed to conserve their authority but probably the majority died.

    If the maximum estimate of 300,000 Vikings, 75,000 of whom were of the age to bear arms, had been concentrated in Tiahuanacu and Cuzco there would have been no successful revolt, but they were scattered across Peru, Bolivia, half of Chile, a quarter of Argentina, in Colombia and Brazil. In these circumstances, all resistance was impossible except locally where the principal objective in any case was survival. The revolutionaries established their capital on the north bank of Lake Titicaca and set up an independent kingdom, more or less organized. Elsewhere anarchy reigned, and of such dimensions that the Temple was unable to ship out the silver from inland mines.

    At Piauí, the fall of Tiahuanacu had not had the same brutal consequences as in the Altiplano and the Amazon forest. The enormous territory of the north-east of Brazil continued as before. It had abundant agriculture, and the work in the mines and foundries continued. Temple ships arrived to load ingots of silver and Norman ships came for brazilwood tree trunks. In 1307, however, some thirty years after the battle at Titicaca, the Temple Order in Europe was dissolved and its ships no longer came to Brazilian waters. The mines were abandoned. The local miners and the Guaranis of the militia followed them little by little. The white forest workers returned to Piauí and like their fellow countrymen adapted to the life of the indigenous natives with whom the relationship remained cordial. Most bachelors amongst them married local women.

    The local "race" at Piauí had the skin colour of the local Indians, mongoloid features, blond hair and blue eyes. These descendants of the Vikings gradually adapted to being fishermen and farmers. Even today (1978) they have merely a subsistence economy and nothing in common with their Nordic ancestors except blond hair and blue eyes.

    After the dissolution of the Templar Order in 1307, the Brothers preferred to seek refuge in Mexico. Of their presence in South America, all that remained was a few traces of Christianity incorporated into the cult of the Sun.

    END
    Last edited by Mecklenburger; 15th April 2021 at 16:01.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Quote Posted by Mecklenburger (here)
    Author de Mahieu calculates that the number of Vikings was around 150,000 concentrated in towns, military colonies and spread across South America.
    150,000 !!! That really does boggle the mind.

    The South American Viking population couldn't have grown that fast, even assuming there were women there as well. With an estimate of a maximum of 120 Vikings per longship (they were quite large), the implication is that there were over 1000 Atlantic crossings.

    If those numbers are correct, this was a major major thing. It seems staggering that these events have been almost completely lost to history, especially in Denmark and Scandinavia where one would think records of some kind would surely remain.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    De Mahieu calculates the Viking population from the arrival (from the Danelaw) of Ullman in the Gulf of Mexico in 987 AD (see my Page 1). That would be the starting point for the calculation of population growth. There were always women present, even aboard the first drakkars. In one of the other books he describes the Viking Amazon females.

    There is a runic inscription in the Paraguay field indicating the location of a Viking cemetery. This has never been found. They would probably not have practised cremation. If we can discover a single Viking skeleton for carbon dating to earlier than 1300 AD we would at least have the proof of the presence in America before Columbus.

    After we have free travel again in these parts I think I would like to visit the State of Piaui and start asking around. I see from the photos that the shore area has been well built up, perhaps they unearthed remains or know where to look. I had better brush up my Portuguese.
    Last edited by Mecklenburger; 16th April 2021 at 13:23.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Quote Posted by Mecklenburger (here)
    I had better brush up my Portuguese.
    I'll start you off with obrigado for this series of posts.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Muchas gracias and I learned a lot from doing the work.

    The Paraguayan angle: until now it was always a mystery to me why the Vikings would have been there. The inscription of 17 runic characters chiselled in the stone indicating the cemetery at Cierro Polilla in the Sierra de Yvytyruzu reads: "toth hof om vrith rimi" which translates to"cemetery near (or in) the Sierra" then follows a hand pointing left. The greatest mystery remains the vault 25 metres below the small mountain Yvyty Pero. The subterranean structure is made of a kind of cement unknown to science and cannot be scratched or even chipped. In 1942 when the Germans(!) were excavating here they sent home for the toughest pneumatic drills and bits known to man. They arrived within two months by U-boat at the Argentine naval base of Bahia Blanca and were flown to Paraguay. But all in vain. It is still not known whether that is a necropolis or a more likely in my opinion a transcontinental tunnel entrance. Whenever I have a spare moment I am reading through the Pdfs of these books to see whatever else of interest can be uncovered.

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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Quote Posted by Mecklenburger (here)
    Muchas gracias and I learned a lot from doing the work.

    The Paraguayan angle: until now it was always a mystery to me why the Vikings would have been there. The inscription of 17 runic characters chiselled in the stone indicating the cemetery at Cierro Polilla in the Sierra de Yvytyruzu reads: "toth hof om vrith rimi" which translates to"cemetery near (or in) the Sierra" then follows a hand pointing left. The greatest mystery remains the vault 25 metres below the small mountain Yvyty Pero. The subterranean structure is made of a kind of cement unknown to science and cannot be scratched or even chipped. In 1942 when the Germans(!) were excavating here they sent home for the toughest pneumatic drills and bits known to man. They arrived within two months by U-boat at the Argentine naval base of Bahia Blanca and were flown to Paraguay. But all in vain. It is still not known whether that is a necropolis or a more likely in my opinion a transcontinental tunnel entrance. Whenever I have a spare moment I am reading through the Pdfs of these books to see whatever else of interest can be uncovered.

    Just googled the mountain and found this site. The mountain looks the stuff of legend!






    Is this the rune you refer to?


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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    Yes, that is the one. Thanks for the above. Very impressive photo.

    De Mahieu says that it was the practice of the Vikings to cremate their dead before the arrival of the Christians "but at least there would have been exceptions made for their major war chiefs who would have been buried below tumuli". Regarding the cemetery indication, Mahieu say that it points north to where the Viking territory rose to Yvyty Pero which name is identical to Cerro Pelado at the foot of which is found the Posta de Yvytyruzu. By "Sierra atormentada" he means the Amambay Cordillera which separates Paraguay from Brazil.

    He goes on to say (p.54) "We did not have the means to open the enormous subterranean cavity that extends below Cerro Ipir and the adjacent meseta. Despite the cement slab that serves as its "roof" we are not certain how much is artificial." He says here that he does not want to draw attention to it because it has "an importance too great" to take the risk. He confirms that it is a Viking site. "In the second place", he goes on, "if the cavity is artificial, in all probability the cemetery is the Posta de Yvytyruzu."

    Now the reason why I think that the impenetrable subterranean structure might be the entrance to a tunnel is as follows.

    (1) In 1940, Fritz Berger, a Sudeten German who had emigrated to Paraguay to help as a weapons repair technician in the War of the Chaco 1932-1935. was engaged as an engineer on the German excavation in 1940. He wrote regularly to a girlfriend in Munich who kept his letters. He drew sketches of four tunnel entrances he had found in the sierra. They were very narrow and extremely long and he had never reached the end of one. Then he wrote to Munich (also the seat of the Nazi Movement) claiming to have discovered a city, "Atlantik" inhabited across a diameter of 50kms and 150 kilometres long. He saw "a grandiose Phoenician installation, large deposits of helium and petroleum and canals still usable." Also "monuments that seemed to be a cathedral and great palaces." (Rey Vikingo del Paraguay, p.12). These reports were dismissed as the ramblings of a crazy mind.


    2) Now compare this legend, (Rey Vikingo, p.9). "In those days there reigned in the region a powerful and wise king called Ipir. He was white and wore a long blond beard. With men of his race and Indian warriors loyal to him he lived in a large settlement on the crest of a cerro (mount). He had fearsome weaponry and possessed immense riches in gold and silver. One day, however, he was attacked by savage tribes and disappeared for ever. That was what my father told me, and what his father told him."

    "He was attacked and disappeared". There is no mention of a battle or a massacre. He disappeared probably into the depths of the mount previously prepared - to where? The further mystery is why this archaeological dig was so important to Germany at war. What did they really expect to find here? Something more than a tumulus! It has to be remembered that these Vikings came from North Germany and well as Denmark, and so what information had been sent back there in the 13th century once the Tiahuanacu empire collapsed?
    Last edited by Mecklenburger; 16th April 2021 at 17:54.

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  25. Link to Post #13
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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    From the 9th century AD the Arabs imported from Malabar and the East extracts of baqqam (brazilwood Caesalpinia Sapan and Pterocarpus Santalinas) for dyeing. These extracts arrived in Europe in the form of pulp or powder and fetched a high price for a small amount. Arab ships were not built to carry logs and had no interest in doing so.

    The situation transformed suddenly towards 1250 AD when cut trunks of brazilwood began to enter France via ports in Normandy. There is no doubt of this, for during the reign of Louis IX (1226-1270) the Libro de los Oficios (Book of Trades) of Estienne Boileau regulated their use by cabinet makers and coopers.

    From where did the Normans import this wood? Not from Asia, for no European ship navigated the Indian Ocean at that time: it would have meant going around the Cape of Good Hope and no Norman ship went farther south along the African coast than the Congo/Zaire. The source must therefore have been Central America and the Amazon, the variety Caesalpinia brasiliensis, and naturally it was all kept a closely guarded secret.

    A mission sent to Europe in about 1250 AD by the Danes of South America arrived in Scandinavia - the Overhogdal tapestry (carbon-dated to 1040-1170 AD) in which llamas are depicted testifies to it.

    Sources: La geografia secreta de America, also to be consulted if I can download the pdf, El gran viaje del Dios-Sol.

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  27. Link to Post #14
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    Default Re: Professor de Mahieu: The Viking/Templar Presence in South America from c.1150 AD.

    (1) "Sometime in 967 AD, a Viking chieftain named Ullman, leading an expedition of Schleswig Danes and many North Germans, sailed from the Danelaw or Ireland. This fact is known from their usage of Anglo-Saxon runes. He came ashore on the Golf of Mexico at Panuco. It is not known for certain that he intended to go there, it is possible that while heading for Iceland, Greenland or Vinland he was blown off course. It would appear that the Indians were more impressed by the Viking boats "with their long prows and flanks covered with shields glinting in the sun, the great sail seeming to palpitate with the wind like fabulous mythological animals" than by the men who manned them. This vision may have been the reason why Ullman entered Mexican history as Quetzalcoatl, the feathered serpent. Here Ullman stayed for twenty years on the meseta at Anahuac as the fifth king of the Toltecs. He left for Tiahuanacu after discovering that some of his crew on the lowlands had disobeyed him and married native women during his absence."


    (2) "At the centre of Sierra de Yvytyruzu is the great rock of some 30 metres in height called Cerro Polilla or Cerro Pelado. On the first expedition there the research team encountered an unexpected obstacle. The rock is home to hundreds of thousands of enormous coloured wasps, extremely dangerous and aggressive. Because of that we could only take rapid photos of the exterior walls. The photos when developed were seen to contain unmistakeable sketches of two drakkars, actually four in all, and some fifteen previously unseen almost illegible runic inscriptions. Thanks to the wasps the place has been protected against graffiti for maybe centuries. At some time in the distant past Cerro Polilla had been used as a viking and inca courier post

    Source: La agonia del Dios-Sol.

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