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Thread: Diceware for better passwords (I mean passphrases)

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    Default Diceware for better passwords (I mean passphrases)

    https://theworld.com/~reinhold/diceware.html

    Quote What Is A Passphrase?

    A passphrase is a bunch of words and characters that you type in to your computer to let it know for sure that the person typing is you. Most security programs allow you to enter a passphrase instead of just a short password for added protection against attackers. Some programs also use your passphrase to form a cryptographic key to encrypt your data.

    Passphrases are used with Wi-Fi wireless network security systems such as WPA and WPA2, when used in personal shared key (PSK) mode. The security of both systems depends on the strength of the passphrase you chose.

    Phil Zimmermann's popular encryption program PGP requires you to make up a passphrase that you enter whenever you sign or decrypt messages. So does the open-source version, GnuPG.

    Popular password manager programs require a master password or passphrase to protect the data they store.

    Passphrases are used with disk encryption programs such as PGPdisk and Apple's FileVault. Many organizations require disk encryption on laptops to meet regulatory requirements for protecting sensitive information.

    The latest versions of most popular operating systems, including Windows 10, MacOS and iOS, let you use longer passphrases for log-on identification.

    Digital currencies, such as BitCoin, use passphrases to protect the coins from misappropriation.

    Using a short passphrase as an answer to a required "security question" (like "What city were you born in?") protects you against attempts to discover your answer by researching your online data.

    You should follow the Diceware instructions here to create your passphrase before installing a WiFi router, creating your PGP or GPG key, opening a new security account or setting up an encrypted disk or digital currency wallet, so when you are asked to enter your new password, you'll be ready.

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    Avalon Member gord's Avatar
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    Default Re: Diceware for better passwords (I mean passphrases)

    The only place a perfect right angle ever CAN be, is the mind.

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    Default Re: Diceware for better passwords (I mean passphrases)

    what about this password (32 chars in size) with 239.58 bit of entropy, it uses extended ascii chars and also could possibly include other chars from foreign languages, but old legacy systems may not recognize/process it (then avoid it), there is something called "Unicode normalization algorithm" which basically means there is similar ways to represent a Unicode character, take for instance NFC (Normalization Form Canonical Composition) and NFD (Normalization Form Canonical Decomposition) Unicode normalization forms, and there is more to it, this stuffs is rather complicated than easy.

    Code:
    5L{6<&H}kأ}3iz:\7V*
    now a passphrase with common words (12 words) using 155.10 bit of entropy.

    Code:
    smile path suspend expand ravage badly jolly snap overdue dispersed moonlike bulb
    I personally stick with a strong password with at least 12 chars.

    It is important to state that most banks and government agencies do not allow this sort of uncrackable passwords for their "clients", my bank allow only upper and lower case letters and numbers, not allowed punctuation, logograms, extended ascii, braces, math symbols, dashes and slashes or quotes. Ah! and it can not exceed 10 chars in size. Guess why they do that? The ATM until last year was 4 numeric chars only, now it is 6 (great I feel safe now LOL).

    I am using KeePassXC last version for Linux (there is also Mac and Windows versions), it works offline and you can carry it in a USB thumb drive if you wish, I do not memorize passwords anymore, it is just impossible

    I keep a backup of my passwords in 2 different places, an external hard disk and a USB thumb drive (both are wrapped in aluminum foil and I do not carry around with me, also that's how I used to keep my bitcoins), doing like that for many many years, never had any issue, all I have to remember is 1 password to open the encrypted KeePassXC program and this password I have only in my brain, if I forget it, then I am screwed.
    --
    A chaos to the sense, a Kosmos to the reason.

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    Default Re: Diceware for better passwords (I mean passphrases)

    Good points. I also use KeepassXC. I use a Diceware passphrase for unlocking the database itself, and then let KeepassXC make randomized passwords for the majority of my accounts. I also use Diceware passphrases for really important accounts like email so that I can log into them even if I don't have my password database on hand. That way, I only have to remember a few passphrases.

    Quote Posted by palehorse (here)
    what about this password (32 chars in size) with 239.58 bit of entropy, it uses extended ascii chars and also could possibly include other chars from foreign languages, but old legacy systems may not recognize/process it (then avoid it), there is something called "Unicode normalization algorithm" which basically means there is similar ways to represent a Unicode character, take for instance NFC (Normalization Form Canonical Composition) and NFD (Normalization Form Canonical Decomposition) Unicode normalization forms, and there is more to it, this stuffs is rather complicated than easy.

    Code:
    5L{6<&H}kأ}3iz:\7V*
    now a passphrase with common words (12 words) using 155.10 bit of entropy.

    Code:
    smile path suspend expand ravage badly jolly snap overdue dispersed moonlike bulb
    I personally stick with a strong password with at least 12 chars.

    It is important to state that most banks and government agencies do not allow this sort of uncrackable passwords for their "clients", my bank allow only upper and lower case letters and numbers, not allowed punctuation, logograms, extended ascii, braces, math symbols, dashes and slashes or quotes. Ah! and it can not exceed 10 chars in size. Guess why they do that? The ATM until last year was 4 numeric chars only, now it is 6 (great I feel safe now LOL).

    I am using KeePassXC last version for Linux (there is also Mac and Windows versions), it works offline and you can carry it in a USB thumb drive if you wish, I do not memorize passwords anymore, it is just impossible

    I keep a backup of my passwords in 2 different places, an external hard disk and a USB thumb drive (both are wrapped in aluminum foil and I do not carry around with me, also that's how I used to keep my bitcoins), doing like that for many many years, never had any issue, all I have to remember is 1 password to open the encrypted KeePassXC program and this password I have only in my brain, if I forget it, then I am screwed.


    =[Post Update]=

    I love this project by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Maybe I should have made it the topic of this thread because it's a better place to start in terms of getting an overall view of computer security.

    https://ssd.eff.org/

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