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Thread: David Paulides' research: over 2000 inexplicable abductions in National Parks, wilderness, and urban areas

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    Australia Avalon Member Constance's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Paulides' research: over 2000 inexplicable abductions in National Parks, wilderness, and urban areas

    Quote Posted by Spellbound (here)
    I assume this has been posted up above. David Paulides completed his 2nd full length movie / documentary...titled Missing 411 - The Hunted....approx 18 months ago. I very much enjoyed it...and I feel it was done MUCH better than his 1st one. It includes an interview with Bruce and Jan MacCabee (Bruce is a famous american physicist) for which Jan had an encounter with a "predator" like being which was cloaked in invisibility and went from tree to tree as she was in a tree stand for deer hunting.

    If anyone has not yet seen this documentary / movie...here are 2 different torrents for it:

    https://pirateproxy.live/torrent/343...Rip.x265-LeviD

    https://pirateproxy.live/torrent/361...p.WEBRip.x264-

    I highly recommend this to anyone who is interested in the topic.

    Dave - Toronto
    Thanks for sharing Dave.

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    UK Avalon Member Matthew's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Paulides' research: over 2000 inexplicable abductions in National Parks, wilderness, and urban areas

    Bump this post. I humbly enjoyed it so much, I was thinking about it earlier

    Quote Posted by Jim_Duyer (here)
    David Paulides is a former police officer who is now an investigator and writer known primarily for his self-published books, dedicated to proving the reality of Bigfoot and his Missing 411 series of books, in which he documents the disappearance of people in national parks and elsewhere. Paulides attributes mysterious, unspecified causes to these disappearances. They are well researched and a good read if you have not already read them. Obviously his investigative
    background brings new talents to the field.

    I don't know the accurate numbers of people worldwide that go missing each year, from causes that can’t be attributed to runaways in many cases, but it is a very high figure, and one that the powers that be seem to want to report as being low. So rather than looking into it, they seem to find no problem with it. Until it is one of their own family, I imagine.

    Anyway, I had some background research in this area from an author named Scott Corrales, which offers a most interesting "alternative" to the UFO phenomenon which I think is very original. I was planning on expanding it into a short book but I really do not have the time to do so, and therefore I am sharing it with you kind folks today. This is directly in line with the thinking of John Keel and Jacque Vallee, both of whom I suspect of working for the intelligence agencies, based upon their later writings, but it's a view that should be considered, if only to discount it if necessary.

    Mysterious Disappearances reported worldwide:

    The Roman author Julius Obsequens, worthy perhaps of the distinction of being the earliest "Fortean" researcher, approached the subject of unexplained disappearances in his Liber Prodigiorum with a story that was well-known to his audience: "One day, when Romulus, founder of Rome, exhorted his troops in the vicinity of the Caprean Swamp, there erupted a sudden, noisy thunderstorm during which Romulus was enveloped in a cloud so dense that he was lost out of sight, and was never again seen by mortal men. He was then ascended to divine rank, and worshipped under the name Quirinus".

    People still disappear, perhaps not as spectacularly as Romulus did (nor are they elevated to godhead), but that they do so is an undisputed fact. It is necessary to separate what could best be described as commonplace disappearances--the ones involving people on the run from the law, deadbeat parents, parents who abduct their children to live in obscurity elsewhere, and a host of other mundane reasons--from the cases which boggle the mind and defy common sense: cases where people vanish without a trace from airplanes travelling at thirty thousand feet, or disappear from rooms that have been locked from the outside.

    Perhaps even more than UFOs, the enigma of sudden disappearance has challenged investigators for a hundred years, and an ominous silence stifles the small, silent question at the end of every case, often all-too-horrible to enunciate: where did these people disappear to?

    The ability to "take a powder" in antiquity was considered the exclusive province of sorcerers and witches. The notorious Apollonius of Tyana disappeared from the sight of the Emperor Domitian and his court, as tradition would have it, causing great consternation.

    Mexican author Artemio del Valle Arizpe gave us the legend of "La Mulata de C¢rdoba", a witch from colonial times who was imprisoned for her uncanny ability to find lost items and hidden treasures: when her jailor stopped by her cell to check on her, he was astounded to see the woman boarding a tiny sailing ship she had drawn on the wall, and sailed off, waving at her captor. The vampires of Eastern Europe were reputedly able to vanish and reappear at will thanks to the evil powers at their disposal.

    Even if the aforementioned were true, it would not begin to solve our dilemma: contemporary cases involving mysterious disappearances do not, as a rule, involve people who want to vanish from the sight of their peers for one reason or another. Their disappearance is often sudden and unexpected, taking place by day or by night, alone or escorted, and sometimes involving the evaporation of the vehicle in which they travelled.

    In 1941, a Swiss rescue team was called upon to search for a group of mountain climbers that had not returned to their base camp. After a number of days, the rescuers managed to find the footprints of the mountaineering party, which stopped abruptly in the middle of a glacier. In this case, the authorities determined "it was a disappearance under circumstances which could not be clearly determined, on account of the facts".

    The Florida state police would be next in line for bemusement, this time resulting from the 1952 disappearance of Tom Brook, his wife, and his 11 year-old son. According to the report, the Brooks had visited a friend some 30 miles away from Miami, and got into their car to return home at 11:40 p.m.. They never completed the trip: local law enforcement found their empty car, headlights ablaze and doors open, just 7 miles away from their friend's house. Mrs. Brooke's handbag was found in the back seat, containing a considerable amount of money. Police records indicate that the family's footprints led to a meadow at the edge of the road, stopping abruptly after a few dozen steps, as in the case involving the missing Swiss mountaineers eleven years earlier. A similar fate befell a French family in 1972: after spending an evening with some friends, and heading back to their home in the early hours of the morning, they never reached their destination, a scant 2 miles away. No satisfactory explanation was ever provided.

    It is difficult enough to find conjectures to account for the fates of these hapless individuals. The task becomes overwhelming when the disappearance of hundreds, even thousands, must be accounted for.

    During the War of the Spanish Succession in 1707, a four thousand-man invasion force under the Habsburg Archduke, Charles, camped at the foot of the Pyrenees on their way to Spain, breaking camp the following morning and marching through a mountain pass. This well-armed and equipped force never reached its goal, nor was it ever accounted for. During the French invasion of Indochina in the mid 19th century, a column of 650 fusiliers marched toward Saigon, disappearing without having ever engaged the enemy. The possibility that the fusiliers had been ambushed by Vietnamese forces was discounted, since another group followed close behind and did not hear the sounds of an armed encounter, nor did it find any scattered arms, gear, or bodies.

    The preceding case histories are well-known to fortean and paranormal researchers. They are the "classic" cases which serve as an introduction to the more recent cases, which remain equally unexplained--a reminder to the determined investigator that others have covered the path before and have been unable to come up with answers. The more recent cases that follow are no less intriguing.

    When the Dutch sensitive Gerard Croiset was employed by the Puerto Rican police in the mid-1970's to find two children belonging to a local millionaire, he concluded, chillingly, that the children were nowhere to be found on this physical plane. Unwilling to be blinded by what they perceived as mysticism, the police thanked Croiset and resumed their investigations with conventional means: the children remain missing to this very day.

    Jose Maria Carnero, a 26 year old medical student, vanished off the face of the earth in April 1987 while on maneuvers with the military unit to which he belonged on the Montelareina Military Base in Zamora, Spain. Reports indicate that Jose Maria wandered away from his squad in the midst of a light rainfall, while the other soldiers tried to find shelter under the trees. The young man was never seen again, even after a massive search by the Spanish army, which to this day lists him as a deserter.

    Author Salvador Freixedo, who looked into the subject of these bizarre disappearances as part of his book La Granja Humana, cites the curious case of a vehicular accident in Burgos, Spain which caused the deaths of a number of people and the disappearance of a 10 year-old from one of the trucks involved in the accident. He was not found among the victims of the crash, and has never been seen again. The police initially believed that the boy had wandered away from the crash scene in an amnesic state, and a thorough search of the area was mounted by both civilians and police officials, yet nothing was turned up. In order to bring the case to a close, the authorities suggested that the boy had been disintegrated, in fact, by a cargo of sulfuric acid being hauled by the tanker truck in which he was a passenger.

    Some of the cases read like science-fiction in their thriller-like quality (bear in mind that science fiction author Isaac Asimov used a mysterious disappearance to transport one of his protagonists to the future in A Pebble in the Sky) and detail. In 1950, a New York City paper allegedly carried a four-line news item relating the death of a pedestrian hit by a car near Times Square. The car had apparently been unable to stop and a crowd of onlookers ran to offer assistance to the unfortunate victim, one Rudolf Fenz, who was pronounced dead. There were details to the sad but uneventful story which were impossible to overlook: the late Rudolf Fenz was wearing decidedly vintage clothing--a frock coat, narrow trousers, buckle shoes and a matching hat. His pockets contained several calling cards to his name, an invoice regarding the lodging and upkeep of a horse and carriage, and a letter postmarked 1876. A search of the New York phone book revealed the number of a Rudolf Fenz, Jr., who had passed away some years earlier. Nonetheless, his widow was able to tell investigator Hubert V. Rihn of the Missing Persons division that her late husband's father had disappeared mysteriously in 1876 while on a trip to the local tobacconist, and never returned home. Rihn allegedly looked through records for that year and found that one Rudolf Fenz, age 29, had disappeared on the same night, last seen wearing a black frock coat, narrow trousers, and buckle shoes.

    Certain locations on the planet have acquired the reputation as places where human disappearances are quite common. Some of them, like the Bermuda Triangle and the Devil's Triangle of Japan, have formed part of "pop" paranormal study for decades. Nonetheless, mountains play a greater role as locales for mysterious disappearances than any other site. In ancient tradition, travelers straying too close to Greece's Mt. Parnassus or Mt. Olympus would often be lost for good. Puerto Rico's El Yunque, New Hampshire's Mt. Glastenbury, and Eastern Zimbabwe's Mt. Inyangani never quite managed to acquire the name recognition of the better-known ones, despite the vast number of unexplained cases which have occurred in and around them.

    Mist-shrouded El Yunque has always been a source of mystery involving paranormal phenomena and more recently, UFOs. Dozens of individuals, largely weekenders and campers, have disappeared inexplicably from this mountain rainforest. A child disappeared while walking down a trail with its parents, and even rescue teams sent to investigate have been swallowed by this deceptive wilderness area. Forestry officials are quick to blame quicksand and unexplored sinkholes as the reasons for these evaporations, even when they occurred in areas far from where any of the aforementioned conditions would be encountered.

    The disappearances at Mt. Glastenbury managed to cause a sensation in peaceful rural Vermont. During a five year span running from the mid-1940's to the early '50s, seven individuals vanished from this peak near Bennington, Vermont. Unlike El Yunque, this location had no prior history of being one from which people could fade into thin air. A number of theories--ranging from black magic activity to UFO abductions--have been shuffled around to explain the disappearances. Mt. Glastenbury's first victim, curiously enough, was a mountain guide who took hunters on treks through the wilderness. This guide, plus four hunters, was never seen again. Another victim was lost under even weirder conditions: he boarded a bus in Saint Albans, Vermont, took a seat, was noticed by the driver and other passengers...but was never seen getting out of the bus, which was a non-stop service to Bennington.

    Zimbabwe's Mount Inyangani is perhaps the most interesting of the mountain sites known for their ability to make people vanish, precisely because in some instances, those missing have turned up with peculiar stories to tell. UFO investigator Cynthia Hind, in an article for FATE Magazine, discusses the experience which befell a present deputy minister in the Zimbabwean government, who was once lost on Mount Inyangani with two companions. According to the deputy minister, the three men walked aimlessly in a state of confusion, feeling neither thirst nor hunger, all the while seeing and waving frantically at the elements of the rescue team, who could not see them at all. Apparently, certain blood sacrifices were offered to the tutelary deities of the mountain, which enabled the three men to "reenter" our normal space-time continuum. Hind's article goes on to say that in the early 80's, a district assistant for the locality which includes Mount Inyangani was himself involved in the rescue operation undertaken to localize a missing government official. The elders of the Tangwena tribe were informed of the official's plight, and a ritual aimed at securing his "return" was performed. The missing official was found the next day, none worse for the experience, but unable to remember what he had done during the two days he was missing. Others have been less fortunate, and their disappearances have never been solved. The efficacy of ritual magic in these cases indicates that there is an intelligence of sorts that can be persuaded, upon occasion, to give up those it has taken, or have heedlessly wandered into its domain. Did the ancient Tainos of Puerto Rico have spells to ransom their lost kin from El Yunque's misty depths? We shall never know.

    Humans have always had a healthy respect for certain bodies of water, mainly freshwater lakes with a reputation for evil. Some of these include the Scottish and Irish lakes investigated by the late F.W. Holiday and lakes and lagoons elsewhere in the world which allegedly harbor monsters or exotic life-forms. Still other lakes are notorious for the matter which occupies us here: mysterious human disappearances.

    British mystery researcher H.P. Wilkins looked into the traditions associated with the "hot" lakes of Iceland's northeastern corner, the unoccupied land known by the ominous moniker of Od dharhraun. This vast wasteland harbors the Askja volcano, a gargantuan crater thirteen miles across, surrounded by a lunar landscape of lava fields and black ash.

    Into this nightmarish corner of the world--suggestive of Tolkien's Mordor--entered a group of young German geologists conducting a survey of Iceland's astonishing volcanic activity. They arrived in 1905 at the fishing village of Husavik and hired a guide to lead them to the Od dharhraun, hitherto shunned by all Icelanders as a supernatural, malevolent place. Against their guide's warnings, the Germans made camp in the forsaken region and two of them boarded a dinghy to reach the center of the volcanic lake. When their companion, who had remained ashore, turned to check on his fellows' progress, he was stunned to realize that they were no longer there--the scientists and their boat had disappeared. The authorities later mounted a rescue effort and the hot lake was dragged, but the scientists had vanished for good. Wilkins adds to this story that any investigator spending some time in Iceland's lonely interior can easily collect a number of stories regarding bizarre disappearances.

    These disappearance-inducing lakes are not safely tucked away in remote regions of foreign countries, either. George Andrews, author of Extraterrestrial Friends and Foes, includes the disturbing supernatural activity surrounding Lake Whitney in the Dallas/Ft.Worth area. Quoting an article from the Fort Worth Star Telegram which appeared in 1976, Andrews introduces us to a body of water into which people and vehicles have disappeared in the most unusual manner possible. Almost a dozen cars have driven off the road into the water since the 1950's, and planes have inexplicably plunged into the depths. Scuba divers have disappeared as well, even though Whitney is a contained lake lacking an undertow. UFOs have also been reported in the vicinity. The official verdict regarding the mysterious disappearances, in most cases, is "negligence leading to drowning."

    The Lake Whitney incidents enable the transition from a passive reason for disappearances to an active one which has received the most attention over the past several decades: UFOs. It is undeniable that there exists a strong link between heavy UFO activity and mysterious disappearances. Researcher Phil Imbrogno points out the sharp increase in missing children reports shortly after the outbreak of saucer activity over the Hudson Valley in the late 1980's--nearly three thousand children disappeared from Westchester County, NY alone. Law enforcement officials were dumbfounded both at the number of missing children and by the fact that they never turned up at halfway homes or red-light districts.

    Patrice Gaston, whose “Disparitions Mysterieuses” remains the textbook on the phenomenon of human disappearances, notes that in the wake of the still-unexplained blackouts that plunged New York City and the Northeast into darkness in 1965, amid heavy UFO activity, 4 million persons were reported as missing by the Tracers Company in the United States alone: an increase by two million to the average yearly figure of people who are listed as missing. Add to this figure the number of unexplained disappearances following the subsequent mystery blackouts that engulfed the planet (from Argentina to the Far East), and it reminds one of Charles Fort's statement, "I believe we are fished for."

    However, we must refrain from succumbing to the temptation of placing the blame squarely on UFOs -- most disappearances, like the ones pointed out earlier, take place independently of UFO flaps. The flying saucer and the intelligence behind it is merely another symptom rather than the cause.

    The truly difficult questions regarding the mysterious disappearance of human beings throughout the ages are: (a) what caused their disappearance? and (b) what became of them? Several theories have been put forward to answer both distressing questions.

    The British scholar F.W.H. Myers believed that in order to fall through the cracks that lead out of our reality into another, wholly unimagined one, the victim must have a hidden "talent" which he termed psychorragic diathesis. This mental condition or ability causes a disruption of the fabric of mind, energy, and matter, sending the hapless victim through the crack in reality. According to Myers, this ability would cause an unintentional, abrupt, and undesired passage from our three dimensional world into a fourth dimensional one, or allow the passage of strange creatures from their own dimension into this one. If Myers was at all on the right track, then one can also suppose that there may be those who have mastered this skill and use it to "teleport" themselves between worlds or planes of existence. The mystery felines, hairy monsters, and chimerical creatures which compose the backbone of Fortean research may have an instinctual predisposition for teleportation, thus shuttling between our reality and their own at will. Authors D. Scott Rogo and Jerome Clark suggested that among the physical characteristics of many bizarre creatures reported, most feature luminous eyes, suggesting that their "home dimension" may be one of darkness.

    Argentinian parapsychologist Juan Jacobo Bajarl¡a offers a different explanation: parapsychology admits the existence of a phenomenon known as hyloclasty--the penetration of matter by matter itself. This phenomenon explains how a solid object can traverse a wall through another dimension without leaving a physical trace. While teleportation would perforce be a side-effect of hyloclasty, Dr. Bajarl¡a warns us that the paranormal effects would only come about in a trance state. The individual must enter the state he denominates paragnosia (the state of paranormal awareness), which overrides the five senses, along with reason and free will. The energy produced by the individual experiencing this condition, usually as a result of fear, can be so intense that it causes the victim to either levitate or be thrust into another dimension, or stranding him/her in an "unfindable" place. A more complete treatment on this interesting hypothesis appears in Dr. Antonio Las Heras' Respuestas al Tri ngulo de las Bermudas (Solutions to the Bermuda Triangle).

    Both Gordon Creighton, editor of the prestigious Flying Saucer Review, and Spanish ufologist Salvador Freixedo have expressed a belief that the elemental beings known to the Islamic world as djinn, jinas, or genies are responsible for a measure of these enigmatic disappearances. These Arabic elementals find their counterparts in the European fairies and Native American spirits and dwarves. The djinn take a great delight in meddling in human affairs, and are able to do so because they are invisible to our eyes. They have the ability to appear in our world under any guise of their choice, and they take great pleasure in abducting humans.

    Fourth and last, we return to UFOs as a cause of disappearances. In a mind-bending case that allegedly occurred in Cajamarca, Peru (no date given), a woman named Isabel Tuct was kidnapped in the wink of an eye by a brilliant UFO that suddenly descended from above while she was hanging the laundry out to dry. Several neighbors allegedly witnessed this event, and the case remains unsolved.

    The testimony of the Zimbabwean officials who disappeared in Mt. Inyangani remains our only means of answering the second question, what becomes of those who vanish under these circumstances. They wandered aimlessly, able to see the rescue teams, but unable to communicate with them. While they didn't experience any hunger or tiredness at the time, it is hardly likely that they could have gone on indefinitely. On a more sobering note, it is interesting to know that the skeletons of some of the victims of Vermont's Mt. Glastenbury turned up many, many years later. Did the act of dying expel the physical body back into our reality?

    Perhaps falling through a time/space/reality warp has devastating consequences for the victim, jumbling their senses and causing irreparable damage. Charles Fort mentions the sudden appearance of apparently amnesic "wild men" in England during the winter of 1904-1905. They were naked and spoke no language known to the available police experts. Could these have been the victims of mysterious disappearances, "spat" out at random in another place and time, their minds ruined by the unnatural passage? If the culprits are indeed the djinn or unseen beings who share the world with us, it's anyone's guess what the victims' ultimate fate might be.

    So there you have it. Many suggestions but nothing concrete - just like the disappearances.

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    Default Re: David Paulides' research: over 2000 inexplicable abductions in National Parks, wilderness, and urban areas

    Thanks for the bump! When I published Extraterrestrial Message I included the story of an abductee, who mentioned that she was told directly that the US Govt was forcing the aliens to police the animal remains inside of National Parks - apparently their "agreement" did not stretch to cleanup details. It's bizarre but interesting to think that perhaps humans were included in this category of "animals".

    Sorry I haven't been on in a bit - I am furiously working on getting out another book that I have complete but needs editing, called "The Bible Says the Earth is Round, and Gives its Accurate Measurement", which is
    a true story by the way. Good luck to you in your journey of discovery.

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    UK Avalon Member Matthew's Avatar
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    Default Re: David Paulides' research: over 2000 inexplicable abductions in National Parks, wilderness, and urban areas

    All the best with the book! If you will excuse the deadpan-pun I believe all flat-earthers will eventually need to do a u-turn

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